AAPT 2023 Winter Meeting - January 14-17
 

2022 Chicago National Conference - Sessions

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Displaying 29 results

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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The Meaning Beyond the Words

McCormick Place - W178a

For years, research on the language of classrooms explored how the way we say things impacts students’ sense of belonging. This session uses the NSTA Teacher Tip Tuesday—The Meaning Beyond The Words: How Language, Race, and Culture Impact Science Teaching and Learning web seminar to consider how we signal to students that we value their ideas and how they communicate those ideas in the science classroom and what we can do as educators to help ensure our students know they belong in the classroom and can do science. Participants will learn about opportunities to continue the learning after the session ends through NSTA’s new Professional Learning Units.

Takeaways: 1. Become aware of how we signal (or don’t signal) to students their ideas and how they communicate their ideas are valued in the science classroom; and 2. Learn strategies to support students in building on their ideas and each other's ideas to move toward building deep conceptual understanding of big ideas in science (disciplinary core ideas).

Speakers

Michelle Phillips (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Kate Soriano (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

https://my.nsta.org/collection/ktURlAGyUA4_E

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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"You Can't Give, What You Don't Have": Preparing future STEM Educators with Sensemaking for Equity

McCormick Place - W193a

Built on the idea that, "you can't give what you don't have" (Heibert, 2018), we have intentionally designed our STEM teacher preparation pathway using the NSTA pillar of sensemaking. The undergraduate STEM major integrates the four pillars of sensemaking across the STEM curriculum and is brought together through a seminar to support culturally sustaining STEM teaching. We will share intentionally designed curricular ideas, investigations across the various fields of study (computer science, engineering, biology, chemistry, and mathematics), field experiences, mentorship and research opportunities for our NSF Noyce Scholars and STEM majors. This will be co-presented with undergraduate students and mentor teachers so participants will get an idea of the collaboration and design across various contexts. As STEM teacher educators, we must design and model sensemaking with supports and scaffolding so that our STEM graduates are confident in designing and revising curriculum that holds sensemaking and culturally sustaining pedagogy at the core (Emdin, 2021; Emdin 2022, Paris, 2012).

Takeaways: Participants will take away specific strategies for designing STEM teacher preparation built on a foundation of sensemaking and culturally responsive pedagogy.

Speakers

Kristin Rainville (Sacred Heart University: Fairfield, CT), Bonnie Maur (Sacred Heart University: Fairfield, CT), Sydney Worthen-Jenkins (Sacred Heart University: Fairfield, CT), Nicole Hebert (Sacred Heart University: Fairfield, CT)

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Using the NSTA Sensemaking Tool to Support Creating, Revising, and Selecting High-Quality Science Lessons

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

Gain experience using the NSTA Sensmaking Tool to become critical consumers of curricular materials and support creating/revising lessons for sensemaking.

Takeaways: 1. Learn how to use the NSTA Sensemaking Tool to review science lessons for the four critical aspects of sensemaking; and 2. Understand how to use the Sensemaking Tool to support creating and revising existing science lessons for sensemaking.

Speakers

Kate Soriano (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

https://my.nsta.org/collection/x2paxwvcfUQ_E

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Becoming AJEDIIs: Teaching and leading STEM education during a pandemic using chemistry and other eqSTrEAM ideas

McCormick Place - W178a

Building on workshops facilitated by Gholdy Muhammad during the 2020-2021 academic year, STEM teachers will explore how historically responsive literacy can be extended to science teaching and learning. The AJEDII Model considers how accessibility, justice, equity, diversity and identity shape pedagogy. Participants will review the framework, develop units aligned to current student learning standards, and explore resources developed by facilitators for a range of instructional modes and situations. When COVID-19 hit our schools, STEM educators took on the task of processing and fighting misinformation, teaching and training students, parents, colleagues and other adults in their community about a wide range of technical terms and implementing novel pedagogical technologies and techniques like never before. The imagined worlds of science fiction were being realized but the ending still has not been determined and has certainly not been predictable. Unfortunately, the pandemic that became most clear in 2020 was exacerbated by social problems that could no longer be ignored. Participants will leave the session with materials for designing instruction for virtual (asynchronous or synchronous) and face-to-face learning based on facilitators’ experiences.

Takeaways: STEM educators will apply Muhammad's (2020) historically responsive framework to secondary STEM education in learning design

Speakers

Joy Barnes-Johnson (Princeton High School: Princeton, NJ), Shefali Mehta (Princeton High School: Princeton, NJ), Mridula Bajaj (Mount Laurel Schools: Mount Laurel, NJ)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Oil Spill Simulation Inquiry
This is a full description of the oil spill simulation that represents STEM as a key component of "cultivating genius". Integrating STEM meaningfully into lessons as a way to allow students to experience joy while building skills, criticality and intellect.
AJEDII Presentation
Overview of how Historically Responsive Literacy (Muhammad, 2020) is applied to chemistry.

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Instructional Materials that Support Equitable Science Instruction for All Students

McCormick Place - W185b-c

In this session, participants will be introduced to a framework for identifying the features of a classroom culture that support equitable sensemaking. There are four main features: 1. Who is engaged in (or excluded from) classroom activity? 2. Who is treated as a "knower" in the classroom? 3. What ways of knowing are privileged in the classroom? 4. What science is practiced in the classroom? This framework is based off Kerri Wingert's Classroom Culture Investigations document and utilized as a foundational pieces of the OpenSciEd materials. Participants will unpack this framework and identify in sample pieces of student work and classroom videos examples of each one of these categories in action. They will be provided with tools and resources for self-assessing their own classroom culture including an exit ticket they can give to students to help inform the instruction. Examples of student work and instructional materials will be from the OpenScIEd instructional materials for middle school science.

Takeaways: Classroom culture is critical to providing equitable sensemaking opportunities for all students.

Speakers

Sarah Delaney (OpenSciEd: San Francisco, CA)

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Evaluating STEM Curricula with Equity and Inclusivity in Mind

McCormick Place - W178b

Explore EiE’s curriculum design principles for inclusivity and NSTA’s sensemaking pillars as tools to evaluate curricula for inclusivity and equity.

Takeaways: Participants will leave this session with a framework for evaluating curricula with equity and inclusivity in mind.

Speakers

Diana Christopherson (Museum of Science, Boston: Boston, MA)

Thursday, July 21
3:40 PM - 4:10 PM
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Dude Perfect Physics…or Using Student Interests as a Conduit to Learning

McCormick Place - W185b-c

It’s important to keep your finger on the pulse of what students are interested in beyond the walls of the classroom. By keeping up with pop culture and current events you gain a window to the world that a child sees. The trick is to capture that interest and use it to communicate academic content through a lens that stays with them. In this session we’ll see some effective tools that keep the message fresh and effective.

Takeaways: Using pop culture interests can be more fun and engaging than putting a character on a worksheet.

Speakers

John Hawkins (Oak Hill School: Nashville, TN)

Thursday, July 21
4:25 PM - 4:55 PM
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Scaffolding Students’ Progression Through CCCs and SEPs Using Resources from the OpenSciEd Toolkit

McCormick Place - W186c

See how tools developed within OpenSciEd units can support students’ progression of and engagement in SEPs and CCCs across a variety of unit contexts.

Takeaways: Participants will leave with practical tools such as graphic organizers, general rubrics, and self- and peer-assessments that can be used to support students in incrementally building SEPs and CCCs in a variety of units.

Speakers

Dawn Novak (Science Educator: Grayslake, IL), Gail Housman (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Jamie Deutch Noll (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

NSTA 2022 Chicago - SEP and CCC Toolkit Slides.pdf
https://www.openscied.org/teacher-resources/

Thursday, July 21
4:25 PM - 4:55 PM
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Using GeoSpatial Data to Teach Climate Justice

McCormick Place - W176a

Let's discuss the expansion and availability of geospatial data (arcGIS, EJScreen, CalAdapt) to examine environmental justice issues in their own community and create climate resilience action plans for an authentic audience (city council, school district, state lawmakers).

Takeaways: Attendees will explore strategies for using geospatial data to examine, interpret, and act on place-based environmental justice issues in their communities.

Speakers

Nancy Metzger-Carter (Sonoma Academy: Santa Rosa, CA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Presentation
Resources, curriculum, lesson plans, sample case studies of student advocacy
Link to Schools for Climate Action Campaign
Free resources for student advocacy for climate justice on local, state and federal level.

Friday, July 22
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Engaging students in problem-based learning through environmental innovation challenges

McCormick Place - W195

The Innovate to Mitigate (I2M) project empowers teachers to employ a problem-based learning approach to incorporate climate change education in their classrooms. Teachers, regardless of whether they teach language arts, science, engineering, or math, work with students to identify potential causes of climate change and to develop a prototype as a potential solution. Collaborative student teams, utilizing the various strengths and interests that they bring from diverse backgrounds, design and develop their projects and finally create a competition pitch. I2M provides a structure for teaching climate change throughout the school year, supports students to discuss their developing mitigation ideas with peers across the nation, and provides an outside incentive for them to work towards an end goal. We propose a mini-simulation of the competition experience where teachers, acting as students, participate in the sensemaking promoted by the competition. Teachers read a short article about an aspect of climate change, brainstorm in small groups to propose a solution that mitigates the problem, and discuss mitigation ideas with other workshop attendees. Facilitators present ideas for collaboration among their students and across the hall with other teachers, identify key NGSS integration opportunities, provide examples of student projects, and help teachers think about integrating such a project into their own classrooms.

Takeaways: Teachers will learn how to identify entry points for climate change education that capitalize on student desires to make a difference about climate change, support collaboration, and incorporate three-dimensional sensemaking.

Speakers

Santiago Gasca (TERC: Cambridge, MA), Natalie Stapert (Master Reading Coordinator: Potomac, MD)

Friday, July 22
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Phenomena to Questions: Practical Engagement Strategies for Student Sensemaking

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b

Explore how to use phenomena to generate student questions that allow for further investigation to support student sensemaking.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn how to effectively use phenomena to allow for authentic student questioning and how to use those questions to increase student engagement and sensemaking.

Speakers

Nicole Vick (Northwestern University: No City, No State)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Phenomena to Questions .pdf

Friday, July 22
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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inquiryHub Chemistry: A Phenomenon-Driven, Year-Long, 3D High School Course

McCormick Place - W196c

This session provides an overview of inquiryHub Chemistry’s year-long, open-source materials. In the session, designers and pilot teachers will share their experiences adapting their practice to meaningful, equity-oriented chemistry learning using units like “How could we search for life beyond Earth?” “How can a small amount of nuclear material destroy a city but also power it?” and “Why are shellfish dying?”. inquiryHub Chemistry comprises 5 units addressing NGSS high school physical science standards in line with A Framework for K-12 Science Education. inquiryHub Chemistry promotes deep conceptual understanding of chemistry using hands-on manipulatives that show how atoms bond. This session will offer 1) An overview of the year-long sequence of open-source chemistry materials, including units on reactions, periodic trends, and in-depth models of matter and energy 2) a chance to experience one of the most complicated models in the curriculum: the Fuels magnet manipulative models, and 3) opportunities to connect with a national network of educators who have taught inquiryHub Chemistry.

Takeaways: Open-source inquiryHub Chemistry materials can be used to promote deep understanding of models and NGSS chemistry ideas

Speakers

Kerri Wingert (University of Colorado Boulder: Boulder, CO)

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Promoting the 5th C-(Citizenship) of 21st Century Skills and CRE into an Inclusive STEAM Classroom

McCormick Place - W176c

The use of inclusive STEAM pedagogy is the forefront of using NRC Framework, Hill’s model, and 21st Century skill in unison for generating a sustainable STEAM curriculum. In this presentation, a demonstration of how to utilize these frameworks into creating project-based learning units that showcase diversity and the embodiment of students seeing diversity in the STEAM careers. The NRC framework will include SEPs for developing and using a model, planning and caring for an investigation, and using mathematical and computational thinking and CCCs of cause and effect, structure and function, and energy and matter. The use of the NRC framework with sensemaking (phenomena, science and engineering practices, student ideas, and science ideas) was the basis for developing a hurricane unit for 6th grade and macromolecule unit for 8th grade. Both of these units are grounded in these frameworks and the 5 C’s (communication, critical thinking, collaboration, creativity, citizenship) and the Hill’s model for cultural and historical education (CRE). All these frameworks are woven together on the Hill model lesson plan template to create hands-on PBL for the students. This presentation will give both STE(A)M and science teachers ideas on how to create a curriculum that incorporates more inclusivity and diversity while showcasing the work of my students.

Takeaways: How to create a lesson that incorporates the 5 C's, CRE, SEPs, CCCs, and sense making into a lesson.

Speakers

Jenniffer Stetler (Chamblee Middle School: Chamblee, GA)

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Discussion-Based Learning: How to Use Talk as a Tool

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b

Academic discourse is a vital part of promoting student sensemaking. Learn how discourse can be used to promote equity and access in the science classroom.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn how to use discussion strategies in the classroom to move student thinking forward, use talk as a formative assessment, and build a classroom culture that promotes student discussion.

Speakers

Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Cheryl Knight (Orland Junior High School: Orland Park, IL)

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Speed Sharing: Creating a High School Classroom Culture That Supports Student Sensemaking

McCormick Place - W196c

Join the members of the NSTA High School Committee as they share how they incorporate sensemaking into their classrooms and learn how to implement these best practices within your own classroom. A roundtable discussion will follow.

Takeaways: 1. High school science sensemaking discussion; 2. Implementation strategies of sensemaking; and 3. Networking with other high school teachers.

Speakers

Ruth Hutson (Blue Valley High/Middle School: Randolph, KS)

Friday, July 22
11:50 AM - 12:50 PM
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Integrating Science and Literacy in Elementary Teaching Programs: Evaluating Pre-Service Teachers' Use of the Touch-Talk-Text Teaching Model

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 11

Elementary preservice teachers integrate science and literacy with the Touch-Talk-Text interdisciplinary framework, allowing ALL students to access science through sensory, language, and discourse connections.

Takeaways: Attendees will gain insight into strategies for integrating science and literacy in the elementary school day, addressing issues of decreased time and resources for elementary science learning.

Speakers

Danielle Scharen (North Carolina State University: Raleigh, NC)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Evaluating Pre-Service Teachers Use of the Touch-Talk-Text Teaching Model

Friday, July 22
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Transforming Teaching Through Curriculum-Based Professional Learning

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

Carnegie Corporation of New York released a challenge paper calling on the education field to transform teaching and learning through the elements and essentials of curriculum-based professional learning. Learn how schools and systems are helping teachers experience the instruction their students experience to help change instructional practices, leading to better student outcomes.

Takeaways: 1. Explore the rationale for a challenge paper dedicated solely to the issue of curriculum-based professional learning; 2. Discover the 10 elements and three essentials of professional learning critical to effective implementation of high-quality science instructional materials; and 3. Consider implications of the roles and responsibilities for putting into action the elements of curriculum-based professional learning.

Speakers

Jim Short (Carnegie Corporation of New York: New York, NY)

Friday, July 22
3:40 PM - 4:40 PM
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3D Assessment that Leverages Interest & Identity

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

Phenomenon-driven assessments can be aligned to standards and engaging to students. This session will answer the question, “How can a 3D assessment engage students’ interest and identity while promoting high-quality science learning?” We call this “5-dimensional” assessment. We will present several examples of phenomenon-driven assessments in grades 5-12 and deconstruct them. What makes them engaging? How does a 3D task unfold over several questions? Where are the big science ideas? Then, we will analyze the student work that 5-dimensional assessments can generate in order to see what 3D learning can result from aligned tasks. Participants will gain a deeper understanding of how to construct a 3D task, investigate student interests, and give meaningful feedback to students that goes beyond “right and wrong” multiple-choice questions. The final part of the presentation will offer examples of tools participants can use to adapt their own assessments by 1) finding meaningful phenomena, 2) connecting the DCIs, SEPs, and CCCs, and 3) writing prompts that integrate all dimensions.

Takeaways: How to design meaningful, interest & identity driven 3D assessments for secondary students

Speakers

Kerri Wingert (University of Colorado Boulder: Boulder, CO)

Saturday, July 23
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Phenomenal STEM: Finding Authentic Problems to Solve in the K–8 Classroom

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

Are identifying and choosing relevant, authentic problems to put in front of your students holding you back from providing opportunities to engage your students in engineering design? In this workshop, gain insight into what makes a problem instructionally productive. We’ll also explore resources available to support you in selecting problems to put in front of your students and strategies to help students identify problems they want to pursue individually or in small groups for STEM competitions or their own interests.

Takeaways: Explore authentic problems to solve in your STEM classrooms.

Speakers

Michelle Phillips (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Saturday, July 23
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Reasoning is Reachable: New Tools for Supporting Scientific Argumentation in Amplify Science Units

McCormick Place - W187c

Engaging in argument from evidence is often the culminating scientific practice for units focused on sensemaking. High-quality units present students with a driving question about a meaningful, complex phenomenon and engage them in a variety of practices to investigate the driving question. A significant challenge that students face in an extended unit is keeping track of the evidence they are collecting and connecting that evidence to the key scientific concepts. Over the last four years, researchers at The Learning Partnership and Northern Illinois University have been collaborating with middle school science teachers at two Chicago elementary schools to co-design tools for supporting students in developing scientific arguments. (1) The Investigation Steps chart uses the NGSS storyline structure to highlight how students will use scientific practices to conduct their investigations and then record what was figured out each day. (2) The Evidence Sorter provides a structure for organizing and weighing evidence and connecting that evidence to reasoning as a precursor to writing their argument. Prior research shows the importance of connecting evidence to key concepts throughout a unit. The tools provide a means for teachers to monitor how students are making these connections and applying those connections in their final argument.

Takeaways: 1. Introduction to tools for supporting students in connecting what is learned each day to the unit goal. 2. Introduction to tools for supporting students in synthesizing evidence and connecting reasoning to develop a scientific argument. 3. Research shows the importance of connecting evidence and key concepts throughout a unit

Speakers

Stephanie Morales (John W. Garvy: Chicago, IL), Randi McGee-Tekula (The Learning Partnership: Western Springs, IL), Emily Dubicki (Mozart Elementary: Chicago, IL), Anne Britt (Dr.: Dekalb, IL), Steven McGee (The Learning Partnership: Western Springs, IL)

Saturday, July 23
9:20 AM - 10:20 AM
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Science Is Social! Student Ideas at the Center of Phenomenon-Driven, Three-Dimensional Teaching and Learning (Elementary)

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

Explore how NSTA’s phenomena-driven lessons/units motivate students to engage in science practices to make sense of science ideas they need to explain how or why the phenomenon occurs.

Takeaways: 1. Understand the critical attributes of sensemaking; 2. Strategies for intentional sequences of student interactions to provide access to participation and learning for all students; and 3. Students’ strategic use of modalities (talk, text, gestures, drawings, etc.).

Speakers

Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Holly Hereau (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Saturday, July 23
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Science Is Social! Student Ideas at the Center of Phenomenon-Driven, Three-Dimensional Teaching and Learning (Secondary)

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

Explore how NSTA’s phenomena-driven lessons/units motivate students to engage in science practices to make sense of science ideas they need to explain how or why the phenomenon occurs.

Takeaways: Understand the critical attributes of sensemaking. Strategies for intentional sequences of student interactions to provide access to participation and learning for all students. Students’ strategic use of modalities (talk, text, gestures, drawings, etc.)

Speakers

Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Holly Hereau (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Saturday, July 23
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Engaging Preservice Elementary Teachers in Making Sense of Sensemaking in Science

McCormick Place - W179a

Strategies from a teacher educator that foster sensemaking and three-dimensional learning with preservice elementary teachers using immersive content experiences highlighting instructional methods and metacognition.

Takeaways: When preservice teachers/teachers are given the opportunity to experience and analyze sensemaking in the context of grade-level learning experiences, they are better prepared to foster sensemaking in their classroom.

Speakers

Beth Pesnell (Kansas State University: Manhattan, KS)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Engaging Preservice Teachers in Making Sense of Sensemaking Presentation Folder

Saturday, July 23
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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A Museum’s Approach to Making Sense of Chicago’s Urban Ecosystem

McCormick Place - W186a

In this workshop, participants will explore Chicago Academy of Sciences/Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum program models that use local, real world phenomena and object based learning to center student sensemaking. We will examine how our curriculum development process leverages local urban spaces, local specimens from both our living and preserved collections, and the work of museum conservation scientists to create opportunities for students to engage in rigorous and authentic science practice. We’ll unpack how a local focus increases both relevance and accessibility. We’ll reflect on the role of iteration in sensemaking, on the benefits of building in routines for revising explanations that allow teachers - and students - to trust the power of these collaboratively constructed student ideas to drive the learning. During the workshop, teachers will experience as learners how the wonder and inclusivity of local natural phenomena provide rigorous and accessible starting points for student driven inquiry. Finally, we will explore how learning ecosystems that connect in school learning with personal experiences can foster positive attitudes toward nature and science, and strategize opportunities for leveraging local natural spaces, institutions and resources to connect students to authentic sensemaking experiences.

Takeaways: Participants will explore phenomena grounded in Chicago's urban ecosystems and strategize opportunities for leveraging local natural spaces, institutions and resources to connect students to authentic sensemaking experiences.

Speakers

Yukako Kawakatsu (Chicago Academy of Sciences/Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum: Chicago, IL), Melissa Siska (Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum: Chicago, IL)

Saturday, July 23
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Ignite Your Professional Teaching Practice with NSTA’s Trilogy of Three-Dimensional Resources

McCormick Place - Skyline W375c

Join us as we explore how NSTA’s three-dimensional resources can be utilized to enhance your teaching. Walk away with effective strategies for science teaching and learning and hear from educators as they provide tips for using these resources.

Takeaways: 1. Hear from classroom teachers about how they are using NSTA Press publications; 2. Learn how to use NSTA resources to shift your practice ; 3. Leave with top-notch teaching tips and innovative lesson plan ideas that promote imaginative learning and student engagement; and 4. Leave with strategies to use in your classroom to promote student engagement in science learning.

Speakers

Christine Anne Royce (Shippensburg University: Shippensburg, PA), Wendy Binder (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Engaging Students in the Science and Engineering of Food

McCormick Place - W196a

Obtaining food to meet our energy and matter needs is a basic requirement of humans and food also defines our culture. This presentation will share how to use elements of the three dimensions of the NGSS and Framework to engage students in making sense of phenomena and problems related to food. Strategies for how to use driving question boards, lesson level learning targets, and engage all learners will be shared. Specific attention will be given for how to align assessments that challenge students to apply their understandings. Participants will engage in a morsel of a storyline on producing the perfect apple. In this storyline, students notice and wonder about different varieties of apples and are challenged to explain why it took 30 years for the Honeycrisp apple to be available to consumers. Students ask questions for how perfect apples are mass produced, how nutrients and environmental factors affect the quality of fruit, and how to attain the right balance of sweet-tart flavor. This storyline weaves together scientific concepts such as meiosis and mitosis, pedigrees and probability, plant structure and function, nutrient cycles, the role of photosynthesis in producing food, and how plants use cellular respiration to survive the winter.

Takeaways: Engage in conversations for how to use the three dimensions of the NGSS and the NRC Framework, storylines, driving questions, formative and summative assessments, and hands-on activities to learn science and engineering skills while making sense of one of our most basic needs – FOOD.

Speakers

Chris Embry Mohr (Olympia High School: Stanford, IL)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Engaging Students in the Science and Engineering of Food
A group of educators is working to develop a series of storylines on food. This is an overview of the first storyline on Producing the Perfect Apple.

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Supporting Early Elementary Students in Asking Questions with Driving Question Boards

McCormick Place - W187b

Wondering how to inspire students’ curiosity and interest in science? Driving Question Boards (DQB) allow you to build science instruction around your students’ own ideas and questions. As students experience phenomena and ask their own questions, science becomes accessible to all students. Students gain similar experiences with phenomena allowing for inclusive classroom discourse opportunities because lack of experience is not an inhibitor. The students’ wonderings then drive the learning process as students engage in sensemaking around driving questions like, “How can we tell a story without using words?” or “How can we change the way that our toys move?” In this session, participants will experience phenomena, construct a DQB and experience other equitable project-based science strategies, designed for early elementary students, that they can take back to their own classroom. Participants will hear stories from real classrooms and access OER research-based curriculum.

Takeaways: Engage in constructing a Driving Question Board (DQB) and other learning experiences designed for early elementary students and reflect on strategies used to support students' figuring out process as they experience and explain phenomena.

Speakers

Amber Richmond (Detroit Public Schools Community District: Detroit, MI), Cory Miller (CREATE for STEM Institute, Michigan State University: East Lansing, MI), Chiara Kirkland (Detroit Public Schools Community District: No City, No State)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

DQB handout PDF.pdf
DQB handout for early elementary
Early Elementary DQB (1).pdf
presentation slides

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Going Beneath the Surface: Using socioscientific issues to help students engage in 3D learning.

McCormick Place - W185a

Socioscientific issues are scientific topics that require students to engage in meaningful discussions (Zeidler & Nichols, 2009). Additionally, engaging students in socioscientific issues can promote equity, diversity, and help students question biases (Goldsmith et al., 2021). Importantly, these issues are often most likely to promote inclusivity if students have a connection with them. Considering we live in the Midwest, we often use socioscientific issues surrounding agricultural practices. We start with a phenomenon that introduces the example socioscientific issue by showing a video about tilling. We then ask, “Should farmers till the land?” To explore this question, we engage participants by jigsawing four different hands-on activities related to the soil. Participants will explore compact vs. loose soil, reducing water erosion, reducing erosion caused by wind and snow, and the effect of a heat lamp on the temperature of soil. Participants will use science and engineering practices such as planning and carrying out investigations and analyzing and interpreting data. We will debrief the activities and model how we help students make sense of the science ideas. We will finish the presentation by discussing how to find suitable socioscientific issues, include culturally responsive teaching practices, and provide some strategies for integrating with the NGSS.

Takeaways: Participants will learn about how to use socioscientific issues and culturally responsive practices to engage students with social issues that require scientific knowledge.

Speakers

Jesse Wilcox (University of Northern Iowa: Cedar Falls, IA)

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Starting with Complex Macroscopic Phenomena - A Different Approach to Teaching Cells & Genetics & Evolution

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b

Complex biological phenomena, such as how the body heals, how trait variations can be both inherited and influenced by the environment, and how organisms’ body structures can change over millions of years require explanations that connect components, interactions, and mechanisms working across multiple levels (at multiple scales). Traditionally, instructional materials have fragmented these complexities for students by starting instruction with the smallest components of the system or the simplest mechanism first (cells, genotypes, mitosis, or natural selection). In this session, we will show a different approach in which students explore the most directly observable levels and most complex aspects of these phenomena first in service of creating more authentic and accessible opportunities to leverage students’ own experiences and questions. These experiences and questions then lead to developing complex science ideas over time. Participants will explore the anchoring phenomena from three OpenSciEd middle school life science units to see how students’ prior experiences and ideas can be used to generate thoughtful questions about the mechanisms involved that will lead students to uncovering the smaller components, interactions, and mechanisms in the related systems through subsequent investigations.

Takeaways: Participants will explore examples of three life science units that use accessible entry points to support students in making sense of complex biological phenomena.

Speakers

Gail Housman (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Michael Novak (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Jamie Deutch Noll (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO), Dawn Novak (Science Educator: Grayslake, IL)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

NSTA 2022 Cells to Genetics.pdf