AAPT 2023 Winter Meeting - January 14-17
 

2022 Chicago National Conference - Sessions

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Displaying 6 results

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Engaging with Data using CODAP in InquiryHub 3D Storylined Biology

McCormick Place - W196a

Analyzing and interpreting data and using mathematical and computational reasoning are complex at the high school level, which requires students to employ correlational and causational thinking while manipulating visualizations using tools. CODAP, a product of the Concord Consortium, is designed to give students access to these powerful practices with minimal software requirements and with a mission to make data literacy accessible for all students. InquiryHub uses CODAP to provide students with agency because they can determine the variables of interest, in which to create graphical representations from the same data set. In our free, open-source program, students can work with authentic datasets from the CODAP website, data they gather, or data from professional studies. Inside our storyline instructional sequences, inquiryHub leverages CODAP as students analyze the rainfall on the Serengeti and how it correlates to wildebeest populations. In the session, participants will try out CODAP by adding multiple variables of data to answer the question, “What’s happening to large animals on the Serengeti plain?” and how to apply CODAP in their classroom.

Takeaways: CODAP can be used in many different three-dimensional ways to have students analyze and interpret data to make sense of phenomena while providing student agency.

Speakers

Kerri Wingert (University of Colorado Boulder: Boulder, CO)

Thursday, July 21
4:25 PM - 4:55 PM
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Using GeoSpatial Data to Teach Climate Justice

McCormick Place - W176a

Let's discuss the expansion and availability of geospatial data (arcGIS, EJScreen, CalAdapt) to examine environmental justice issues in their own community and create climate resilience action plans for an authentic audience (city council, school district, state lawmakers).

Takeaways: Attendees will explore strategies for using geospatial data to examine, interpret, and act on place-based environmental justice issues in their communities.

Speakers

Nancy Metzger-Carter (Sonoma Academy: Santa Rosa, CA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Presentation
Resources, curriculum, lesson plans, sample case studies of student advocacy
Link to Schools for Climate Action Campaign
Free resources for student advocacy for climate justice on local, state and federal level.

Friday, July 22
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Getting Carried Away: The UpLab

McCormick Place - W176a

Using the Dual Range Force Sensor, participants will determine how many helium balloons are needed to lift themselves and the house from Disney’s film Up.

Takeaways: 1. Using the phenomenon of the helium balloon lifted house from the movie "Up," attendees will leave with a lab using the Dual Range Force Sensor to determine the amount of balloons needed to lift themselves and the house; and 2. the session will show how this can be used for any level of student, and as a bonus will also incorporate how the data collection and analysis can be collected using Python coding.

Speakers

Todd Graba (Crystal Lake South High School: Crystal Lake, IL), Brad Posnanski (Comsewogue High School: Port Jefferson Station, NY)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
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Presentation

Friday, July 22
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Transforming Teaching Through Curriculum-Based Professional Learning

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

Carnegie Corporation of New York released a challenge paper calling on the education field to transform teaching and learning through the elements and essentials of curriculum-based professional learning. Learn how schools and systems are helping teachers experience the instruction their students experience to help change instructional practices, leading to better student outcomes.

Takeaways: 1. Explore the rationale for a challenge paper dedicated solely to the issue of curriculum-based professional learning; 2. Discover the 10 elements and three essentials of professional learning critical to effective implementation of high-quality science instructional materials; and 3. Consider implications of the roles and responsibilities for putting into action the elements of curriculum-based professional learning.

Speakers

Jim Short (Carnegie Corporation of New York: New York, NY)

Friday, July 22
3:40 PM - 4:40 PM
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A River Story: Designing STEM Learning Experiences in an Equitable Context for Young Learners with Diverse Backgrounds

McCormick Place - W184b-c

Dive into (equitable) three-dimensional learning and promote STEM teaching and sensemaking strategies that place equity at the center of learning, making science connections to local context.

Takeaways: Explore how placing equity at the center of STEM education changed teacher attitudes about science teaching and learning, developed supportive networks for formal and informal educators to advance science education, created opportunities for teachers to design three-dimensional learning experiences, and provided equitable opportunities for students and families in an urban high-needs district.

Speakers

Elizabeth Nunez (New Brunswick Public Schools: New Brunswick, NJ), Sarah Sterling-Laldee (Paterson Public Schools: Paterson, NJ), Ashley Delgado-D'Amore (Lord Stirling Community School: New Brunswick, NJ), Grace Lugo (New Brunswick Public Schools: New Brunswick, NJ)

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Going Beneath the Surface: Using socioscientific issues to help students engage in 3D learning.

McCormick Place - W185a

Socioscientific issues are scientific topics that require students to engage in meaningful discussions (Zeidler & Nichols, 2009). Additionally, engaging students in socioscientific issues can promote equity, diversity, and help students question biases (Goldsmith et al., 2021). Importantly, these issues are often most likely to promote inclusivity if students have a connection with them. Considering we live in the Midwest, we often use socioscientific issues surrounding agricultural practices. We start with a phenomenon that introduces the example socioscientific issue by showing a video about tilling. We then ask, “Should farmers till the land?” To explore this question, we engage participants by jigsawing four different hands-on activities related to the soil. Participants will explore compact vs. loose soil, reducing water erosion, reducing erosion caused by wind and snow, and the effect of a heat lamp on the temperature of soil. Participants will use science and engineering practices such as planning and carrying out investigations and analyzing and interpreting data. We will debrief the activities and model how we help students make sense of the science ideas. We will finish the presentation by discussing how to find suitable socioscientific issues, include culturally responsive teaching practices, and provide some strategies for integrating with the NGSS.

Takeaways: Participants will learn about how to use socioscientific issues and culturally responsive practices to engage students with social issues that require scientific knowledge.

Speakers

Jesse Wilcox (University of Northern Iowa: Cedar Falls, IA)