2022 Chicago National Conference

July 21-23, 2022

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FILTERS APPLIED:Hands-On Workshop, Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

 

Rooms and times subject to change.
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Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Using tools to sense and interact with the environment

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W193a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Using tools to sense and interact with the environment.pdf

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

After learning about computational thinking, participants will apply the framework to determine where students engage in computational thinking within the activity. Participants will engage in activities where students engineer as part of the investigations. Participants will be able to use a pre-programmed microcontroller (loaned by the presenters) to experience 3 different short investigations each tied to a different phenomenon. 1) Does angle matter? How does the angle of the collector affect how warm it is? Using the microcontroller and lamps participants will collect data to build a model that explains why the tilt of the Earth creates different seasons. 2) Transparent, Translucent, and Opaque. When working in a greenhouse, different materials can be used to cover the greenhouse. Which is the best material for your area? Using the light level sensor on the microcontroller, participants test different materials to recommend their uses when designing a greenhouse. 3) Making an alarm - using the microcontroller accelerometer sensor, participants arm an alarm and see how the accelerometer works in three dimensions. Participants will be provided printed copies of the lesson plans and how to engage students with using the microcontrollers. Note that no knowledge of coding or any equipment brought is necessary to participate in this workshop.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn (1) Microcontrollers are small computers that come with several integrated sensors. Their functionality makes them useful for both investigations and engineering projects. Some of the basic functionality of different microcontrollers (2) One definition of computation thinking is how to use computers to solve problems. Computational thinking activities that connect students to everyday phenomena. The development of algorithms or the decomposition of problems into simple steps are just two examples of processes associated with computation thinking. It is a powerful problem-solving technique that is used in the modern world (3) How engineering tasks provide opportunities for student sensemaking

SPEAKERS:
Susan German (Hallsville Middle School: Hallsville, MO), G. Michael Bowen (Mount Saint Vincent University: Halifax, NS)

Inclusive, Hands-on Science Instruction for Elementary Students K-5

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W186c


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

As a K-5 English Learner Teacher, I work with all grades, and for the last five years I've been helping students reach NGSS Performance Expectations through inductive, hands-on science lessons. I’m also a Science Methods Professor at North Central College, where I coach pre-service teachers in how to create and teach NGSS-aligned, three-dimensional science lessons. In this session, teachers will experience several hands-on mini-lessons and explore the meaning of inductive learning in science. Teachers will inductively discover how circuits work and engineer solutions for erosion. We’ll also use digital microscopes to explore the needs of plants and the structure and function living things, so please bring a device with a USB port if you can. Throughout the session, I’ll showcase digital portfolio examples from my K-5 students over the last 5 years. Elementary teachers are often intimidated by teaching and assessing the ambitious performance expectations of the NGSS, especially given the limited class time available for science instruction. Incorporating experiential science lessons with reading, writing, and speaking allows cross-curricular connections with ELA. Teachers will see many examples of digital notebooks used with English Learners and special education students for ongoing performance assessment of both Science and ELA standards.

TAKEAWAYS:
Inductive, and inclusive hands-on science experiences and the use of digital portfolios lead to deeper learning as well as ELA & Math connections for K-5 students.

SPEAKERS:
Melissa Eaton (Cowlishaw Elementary School: Naperville, IL)

STEM for All! Benefits of STEM Integration for Struggling to Gifted Learners, and Everyone in Between

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W187b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA_STEMforALL.pdf

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

To effectively engage audience members, I will balance their readiness to learn, cognitive load, and stimulating activities. Using real-world examples, I will demonstrate the power of STEM in elementary classrooms to grow all learners and provide necessary 21st-century skills. Often STEM is an enrichment offered to high-achiever but struggling learners have even more to gain from STEM including confidence and leadership. I will focus on practical application, but valuable references and data will be included to support my practices. I will begin the session with a survey to identify the needs and perceptions of participants regarding STEM integration. Based on input, I will share research-based strategies, classroom integration examples, or dispel misconceptions. I will include an interactive STEM activity using index cards and paper clips to provide a STEM lesson model and demonstrate the ease of integrating STEM with simple, classroom supplies. Participants will leave the session with a better understanding of the benefits of STEM in K-5 classrooms and feel more comfortable integrating STEM into their own classrooms.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will understand the value of STEM integration beyond the four letters of the acronym, including the benefits of productive struggle of high achievers and how the grit of struggling learners are paramount in the success of STEM challenges.

SPEAKERS:
Erika Neuman (University of Texas at San Antonio: No City, No State)

DCI, CCC, and SEPs, Oh My! Sweet and Salty Investigations with a 3-D Twist!

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W176c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
DCI, CCC, and SEPs Oh My! (2).pdf

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Discover how to implement three-dimensional learning into any science curriculum, all while engaging learners to become phenomenal!

TAKEAWAYS:
How to use SEPs to drive student instruction and molecular-level modeling of processes using data to support claim.

SPEAKERS:
Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA)

Chickenology: Food Delivery Challenge

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W179b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Chickenology Food Delivery Challenge Lesson
Chickenology Food Delivery Challenge Slide Deck
Chickenology Student Rubric

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Participants will use sensemaking and the engineering design process to solve a real world food production problem in a small scale format. This lesson introduces the Food Delivery Challenge, in which participants must design a gravity feeder to carry food (chicken feed) to twelve hungry chickens for over 24 hours. To accomplish the task students must design and build a model of an efficient gravity feeder using the materials available to them. The scenario presented to the class: One of the feeders in your uncle’s barn has broken down, and a new one will not arrive until next month. You must create a gravity feeder to satisfy 12 chickens for 24 hours consistently to ensure the health of your flock. Participants will research, design, build and test their design before presenting to the group for feedback, Participants will then use the feedback to redesign for an improved feeder.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Use the engineering design process to collaborate, design and build a gravitational feeder system that will feed 10 pounds of feed over a 24 hour period. 2. Present your design plan, and final product to the class for feedback. 3. Provide feedback to the design team for design improvement.

SPEAKERS:
Leah LaCrosse (McCormick Junior High School: Huron, OH), Heather Bryan (Nourish the Future - Education Projects, LLC: Columbus, OH)

Let's Get Middle School Students Interested in Climate Change!

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W175a


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

What causes seasons on Earth? How is permafrost affected by climate change? What can we learn from ice cores about climate? These questions are answered through a series of NGSS aligned, hands-on activities. Students design an experiment to test the effect of Earth’s tilt on seasons, explore the effect of climate change on structures built on permafrost, and more! The eesmarts climate change curriculum is composed of adapted lessons surrounding natural cycles that occur on Earth and in our solar system, including the carbon cycle and sunspot activity, how these cycles affect populations, and how humans may affect natural cycles. Activities examine evidence from the past through proxies such as tree rings, cherry tree blossoms, and ice core data. Additional topics include climate and ecosystems, the impact of invasive species, and how to minimize the effect of human activity. The lessons are part of the eesmarts K-12 curriculum, an energy efficiency and clean, renewable energy learning initiative funded by the Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund. They are written in the 5-E Instructional Model and include presentation Google Slides and handouts. Select digital resources will be provided to participants. The complete eesmarts program is free and available to all Connecticut educators.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will explore activities involving natural cycles including the sun cycle, the carbon cycle, and seasons, as well as a variety of proxies and what they can tell us about Earth’s climate past and present.

SPEAKERS:
Kathleen Brooks (CREC: No City, No State), Karin Jakubowski (eesmarts: No City, No State)

Using scientific data and data collection to make sense of real world phenomena!

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W176a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Chicago Packet.pdf
Copy of Opening (1).pptx

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Using data collection , participants will learn how to actively engage students in a conversation about data and the phenomena that it explains. Participants will learn how to create and/or modify old lessons, labs, and activities into opportunities for discussion , inquiry, and discovery using calculators, Nspire, and labquests.

TAKEAWAYS:
Create a dynamic lesson for use in the science classroom using data collection.

SPEAKERS:
Chris Coker (Camden Fairview High School: Camden, AR)

Data, Tables, Graphs, Oh My! Strategies to Get All Students Doing & Speaking Science

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W176c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Access to Resource Document
Complete the Google Form to gain access to the Resource Document and slide deck from the workshop.

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

We are naturally curious, prone to ask why? How? What? Unfortunately, somewhere along the way students lose the trust in their voices to ask questions of and from data. But data are what we use to do science and it permeates all aspects of society today. What should we do? Stop teaching the vocabulary of science and data first, and instead leverage classroom-ready strategies to empower students to lead with their innate curiosity to practice critical 21st century data literacy skills and master the science content. Join us to explore connections between our science content, inquiry-based activities, and data skills. We will experience research-based strategies and freely available resources for integrating phenomenon-based and local data into our science instruction to promote science literacy and student empowerment. We will participate in activities ourselves and reflect on approaches for how to bring these into our classrooms. Participants will leave more empowered to integrate data into their science content in purposeful ways to better help students do and communicate science. Working with and learning science from data fosters critical thinking skills, lifelong interests in science, and facilitates learners’ overall self-identity as a scientist. Let’s set all of our students up for success!

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will identify how data literacy is a critical aspect of science literacy in the 21st century, how students can do a lot more with data than we often think or presume from their science vocabulary alone, and how to leverage existing strategies to authentically integrate data into 6-12 science instruction to teach their science content and increase literacy simultaneously.

SPEAKERS:
Kristin Hunter-Thomson (Dataspire Education & Evaluation, LLC)

Evolution Game: Demystifying Speciation

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W195



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Evolution Game slide show
These slides will be used in the workshop to introduce and explain using the Evolution Game as a teaching tool. The game clarifies how species evolve through mutations, natural selection, and just plain luck. Students "evolve" their creatures, use their artistic abilities to draw mutations, and have fun while learning.

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

This session will start with an overview of the challenges involved in teaching the theory of evolution, including common student misconceptions. Participants will then spend 30 minutes playing the Evolution Game, developed by the speaker, in which players evolve and sketch the changes to their species. The game is really fun and involves, student inquiry, collaboration, problem solving, and touches on the engineering of species that is inherent in evolution. The session will end with a discussion of concepts learned, a copy of an assessment sheet will be shared, and all participants will leave with an electronic copy of the game.

TAKEAWAYS:
Demystifying how good, bad, and benign mutations can make a species survive, evolve, or become extinct through an interactive, fun board game.

SPEAKERS:
Sarah Faulkner (East Granby Middle School: East Granby, CT)

STEAM Ahead in the Elementary Classroom

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W194a


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Participate in a hands-on STEAM activity and learn about how Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math are integrated in the K–5 classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Participate in an example hands-on STEAM activity; 2. Walk away with multiple ideas to use in your classroom; and 3. Discuss the art and science practices and how they can be integrated in the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Patricia Whitehouse (William C. Goudy Technology Academy: Chicago, IL), Jenna Sanei (Concordia University Chicago: River Forest, IL)

Unmasking Engineering Practices

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W175c


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

In this hands-on workshop, participants will make and preform tests on COVID masks to use engineering practices to design a mask that is both comfortable and protective.

TAKEAWAYS:
Inquiry-based STEM is a collaborative process in which students act and think like engineers and scientists to make the learning environment inclusive for ALL learners.

SPEAKERS:
Karen Ostlund (The University of Texas at Austin: Austin, TX)

Local Phenomenon-Based Projects

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W185d


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Learn how to better integrate local phenomena into classroom learning through the use of long-term projects and a competition.

TAKEAWAYS:
Strategies to use student-chosen local phenomena as the basis for long-term projects and participation in a national STEM competition.

SPEAKERS:
Winnie Boyle (NSTA: No City, No State)

Unraveling the Mysteries of Color: Adding (and Subtracting) It All Up!

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W193b


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Investigate how colors mix, by adding light sources or by removing colors from white light, and discover how cell phones and newspapers use these methods.

TAKEAWAYS:
Color mixing has different outcomes when light sources are added than when dyes or inks subtract colors from a white background. Additive color systems are used in TVs and computer screens, while subtractive colors are found in photos and paintings.

SPEAKERS:
Gary Benenson (The City College of New York: New York, NY), Stephanie Codrington (Benjamin Banneker Magnet School of Architecture and Engineering: Brooklyn, NY), Kathy Gutierrez (P.S. 536: Bronx, NY), Gary Benenson (The City College of New York: New York, NY)

iHub Anchoring Phenomenon Routine Polar Ice Unit

Friday, July 22 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W196c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Experiencing the iHub Anchoring Phenomenon Routine in the Polar Ice HS Chemistry

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Attendees will experience the Anchoring Phenomenon Routine as students do in iHub’s Polar Ice unit. This routine engages students in asking questions about why people from around the Earth are being displaced from their homes as a starting point in a unit of study focused on how we can slow or stop polar ice from melting before the sea level rises too much. After experiencing the routine, attendees will analyze the routine through an equity lens.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how the iHub curriculum supports teachers in eliciting and making use of students’ own questions and their experiences in instruction, which supports student motivation and agency (Harris, Phillips, & Penuel, 2011).

SPEAKERS:
Rachel Patton (Denver Public Schools), Kathryn Fleegal (Denver Public Schools: Denver, CO), Beth Vinson (Denver Public Schools: Denver, CO)

Experience Before Explanation: Making STEM Lessons Accessible for All

Friday, July 22 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W185a


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Come learn how you can make your STEM lessons more accessible for all students by making a few simple changes to your instructional sequence. During this session you will experience an engaging hands-on lesson that models what this structure can look like in a real classroom. We will also discuss the research behind allowing students to experience concepts before introducing students to new vocabulary terms and how this can give all students an entry point into learning STEM content.

TAKEAWAYS:
Sequence matters! When we allow students to experience concepts before we introduce scientific and academic vocabulary, we give all students an entry point into STEM content.

SPEAKERS:
Lee Jimenez (3rd Grade: , OH), Leslie Silbernagel (Northern Kentucky University: Highland Heights, KY)

Equilibrium Misconceptions Are Best Resolved By Inquiry!

Friday, July 22 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W196c


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Chemical equilibrium is a central topic to the understanding of both Chemistry and Biology-yet students have many misconceptions about equilibrium. The NGSS standard HS PS1-6 covers this important topic. In a recent AP Chemistry Exam, the vast majority of students did poorly on the topic of had misconceptions about equilibrium-73 % of the students received a zero or had no response to the equilibrium question. Students are most familiar with equilibrium problems and experiments where the K value is small-usually less than 1. This AP Exam question dealt with a large K value causing the majority of students to do poorly. In this presentation, participants will take part in a “hands on” inquiry activity using appropriate technology to collect and analyze data for a chemical equilibrium having a large K value. Participants will: undertake a “hands on” equilibrium Inquiry with a large K value, use Inquiry to resolve equilibrium misconceptions, & use appropriate technology for data collection/analysis. Join this workshop to take an inquiry lab back to use in your classroom. Handouts will be provided. There will be time allotted for participant questions.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn to use Inquiry to overcome student misconceptions about chemical equilibrium.

SPEAKERS:
Gregory Dodd (Retired Chemistry Teacher: Pennsboro, WV)

Copper, An Essential Metal: A Two Unit Inquiry!

Friday, July 22 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

McCormick Place - W196c


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Copper is used in plumbing, coinage, and electrical wiring; yet we often take this element for granted. Copper has been known since at least 9000 BC, but many of its reactions and properties have only been determined in recent centuries. This inquiry requires students to: research the chemical reactions of copper (redox, double displacement, and decomposition), apply prior knowledge of stoichiometry and conservation of matter, analyze a copper solution using spectroscopy, and use proper laboratory techniques and skills. NGSS standards HS PS1-2, HS PS1-5, and HS PS1-7 will be addressed. Participants will: Research and design an Inquiry experiment, use technology to collect/analyze data, & visualize what occurs on the submicroscopic level by employing particulate drawings. Join this workshop to take home a two-unit inquiry lab to use in your classroom. This Inquiry is a perfect end-of-course lab practical. There will be time allotted for participant questions. Handouts will be provided.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how Inquiry can be used successfully in their classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Gregory Dodd (Retired Chemistry Teacher: Pennsboro, WV)

Artemis Mission Activities: Landing Humans on the Moon

Saturday, July 23 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

McCormick Place - W184d


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Learn about NASA’s Next Gen STEM educator resources and how to join our first online community of practice for STEM educators (CONNECTS).

TAKEAWAYS:
Educators will learn about future opportunities with NASA for student participation while completing a lunar lander design challenge.

SPEAKERS:
Lynn Dotson (NASA Office of STEM Engagement-GoH: Kennedy Space Center, FL)

Nourish the Future: Energy and Biofuels

Saturday, July 23 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

McCormick Place - W196a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Nourish the Future Energy Biofuels slide deck
Nourish the Future Fermentation Factories Student Lesson
Nourish the Future Fermentation Factories Teacher Document

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Students utilize different components (enzymes, yeast, feed stocks, and water) to produce ethanol and carbon dioxide through the process of fermentation. Students will develop a model of fermentation and explain how ethanol is made to answer the focus question "How can fermentation produce a renewable fuel source?" Students will develop experimental models to generate data in order to construct explanations about the relationships between the components of the fermentation process and to predict how those relationships can be manipulated to produce carbon dioxide. Students will design solutions to make the fermentation process as efficient as possible and generate the maximum amount of ethanol in a small bag environment Attendees will participate in hands-on activities centered around biofuel. Participants are going to prepare and compare different amounts of fermentation occurring in four different mixtures which will allow observations of production rates. A second activity focuses on a way to make a qualitative or quantitative explanation regarding the relationship between feed stock and glucose availability for ethanol production. Participants will deconstruct a model of starch to examine enzyme and starch reactions to determine how starches change into smaller molecules. Three additional hands-on activities that can be included in your classroom curriculum will be discussed.

TAKEAWAYS:
Nourish the Future is a national education initiative developed by science teachers for science teachers to connect students to modern agriculture and provide sound science based resources that meet teacher and student needs in the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Tiska Rodgers (Clarkton High School: Clarkton, MO), Leanne Thele (Perryville High School: , MO)

Inclusivity through Evidence in High School Physics Courses

Saturday, July 23 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - W196c


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

What is it about how students engage with physics that perpetuates inequities in physics courses and in the field of physics more broadly? In this interactive workshop, participants will consider tents of inclusive physics instruction and contribute to a broader conversation about power structures and pedagogy that facilitate inclusivity. By analyzing videos of students working in a learning environment where they engage in science practices as a way of inducing physics principles (in alignment with the three dimensions of the Next Generation Science Standards), participants will consider how both the structure of the lessons and teacher moves can cultivate more equitable environments. We suggest that this learning environment disrupts traditional power structures that exist in classrooms, enhancing students’ voice both in authoring ideas and sanctioning ideas. Participants will consider what counts as success in a physics class and when and how people are recognized and rewarded. In the workshop, I’ll share discussion protocols and some of the student-facing physics lessons I’ve used that support this work.

TAKEAWAYS:
How can student-collected evidence and consensus building serve to make high school physics courses equitable and inclusive?

SPEAKERS:
Shelly Belleau (University of Colorado Boulder: Boulder, CO)

Programming Simple Tools to Facilitate Science Inquiry Investigations

Saturday, July 23 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W184d



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Programming Simple Tools to Facilitate Science Inquiry Investigations.pdf

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Participants will learn about the framework for computational thinking and then learn to apply it to science inquiry investigations using Block Coding (used with students in elementary and middle school in many jurisdictions) and how it can be used to improve the conduct of science investigations (and be more like the investigations conducted by scientists).   Participants will apply the computational thinking framework to creating/modifying/using simple programs (either using a free online programming tool OR with a simple, inexpensive microcontroller that will be loaned by the presenters) that can be used in science inquiry investigations either for conducting the investigation (e.g., a random number generator) or for collecting data (e.g., a counter and a timer). Investigations where these can be used will be discussed and demonstrated. The use of the microcontrollers and/or a free online programming tool to develop a simple measurement tool provides participants (and their students) an opportunity to experience a simulated situation a scientist or engineer would face as they use computing tools to develop automated measuring responses.   Finally, as an example of what is known as “physical computing”, participants will learn to build (and will build if time allows) a physical interface (to use with a computer or Chromebook) that allows them to interact with a program they have either written or downloaded.   Participants will be provided printed copies of example lesson plans and instruction sheets on how to engage students with using the Scratch program and the microcontrollers). Note that no knowledge of coding or any equipment is necessary to participate in this workshop. 

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how computational thinking (applied to simple block coding examples and simple micro-controllers) can be used in science classrooms to help students conduct better inquiry investigations and better experience “authentic” science practices.

SPEAKERS:
G. Michael Bowen (Mount Saint Vincent University: Halifax, NS), Susan German (Hallsville Middle School: Hallsville, MO)

Butterfly Gardening Using Native Plants

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W185d


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Butterfly Gardening Using Native Plants workshop is a very exciting educational experience! This session will guide participants through exposure to native North American plants that are host plants for butterfly caterpillars as well as nectar plants to attract adults. We will participate in an assortment of hands-on activities which include creating a "Life Cycle Plate" and singing the "Metamorphosis Song". A main focus of this session is to provide participants with strategies to enable them to create and sustain their own schoolyard habitat. A roadmap to success will be shared, along with a question and answer session for potential challenges! . Beyond the workshop, continued implementation support will be shared with a comprehensive digital data collection and email contact information provided to participants. They will also receive contact information for the North American Butterfly Association, and The Native Plant Society for their local area. Resources will be shared focusing on the importance of organic gardening in relationship to a successful butterfly garden. Finally, an assortment of grant opportunities will be shared in order to assist teachers in getting funding for their projects. Upon completion of this time together, butterfly enthusiasts will be dispatched throughout the country. Once implemented, students and parents will be captivated by the beauty of the garden, and will sustain life lessons on the vital connection we share with our environment.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participates will leave with the knowledge to go back to their schools/classroom equipped with the knowledge to set up an area to attract an assortment of native butterflies.

SPEAKERS:
Nancy Sale (Lillie C. Evans K-8 Center: Miami, FL)

Energize Your Climate Change Course for High School

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W175c


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

How and why has Earth’s climate changed over time? How do we collect data about Earth’s natural history? How do Earth’s orbital variations affect climate? What role does phytoplankton play in the Carbon Cycle? These are all questions that are answered by exploring a series of hands-on activities that are NGSS aligned. Activities include: eccentricity, obliquity, precession, carbon and plants, the effect of carbon dioxide on temperature, ocean acidification, and more. The climate change curriculum, from the eesmarts K-12 curriculum, an energy efficiency and clean, renewable energy learning initiative funded by the Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund, is made up of adapted lessons surrounding natural cycles that occur on Earth and how humans may affect natural cycles. Activities examine evidence from the past through proxies such as forams and ice core data. Additional topics include sea-level rise and vulnerability, the impact of single use plastics, and how the effect of human activity can be minimized. The lessons are written in the 5-E Instructional Model (Engage - Explore - Explain - Elaborate - Evaluate) and include teacher-presentation Google Slides and student handouts. Select digital resources will be provided to participants. The complete eesmarts program is free and available to all Connecticut educators.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will explore activities that demonstrate how and why Earth’s climate has changed over time.

SPEAKERS:
Karin Jakubowski (eesmarts: No City, No State), Kathleen Brooks (CREC: No City, No State)

Facilitating Inquiry for Growth in Science and Engineering Practices: Exploring Surface Heating

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W178a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Exploring Surface Heating.pdf
UHI Observations.pdf

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Learning through place-based, student-centered, teacher-facilitated STEM inquiry increases student engagement in and ownership of learning and promotes student growth in science and engineering practices, disciplinary core ideas, and crosscutting concepts. Using a unit plan I developed for exploring local microclimates, participants will engage in activities and discussion of techniques for cultivating students as collaborators in the learning process. The unit is designed to encourage growth in asking questions, designing and conducting investigations, collecting data, making sense of data, communicating findings, and identifying local problems and designing solutions to a student-identified problem. Participants will use NASA infrared images of surface temperatures captured during an ISS mission to observe the urban heat island phenomenon. They will explore Google Earth to spark questions about surface heating that can be answered through investigation of the local neighborhood or school campus. Given a list of equipment that students used during the unit, participants will collaboratively design an investigation to collect place-based data. Discussion includes extension activities that facilitate student understanding of surface heating and cooling. Discussion also includes how revision and reflection can be used to monitor individual student growth and promote ownership of learning by students. Emphasis is on facilitation techniques.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learning through place-based, student-centered, teacher-facilitated STEM inquiry increases student engagement in and ownership of learning and promotes student growth in science and engineering practices, disciplinary core ideas, and crosscutting concepts.

SPEAKERS:
Loris Chen (Science Education Consultant: Fair Lawn, NJ)

Object-Based Inquiry in the Multilingual Classroom

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W179b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Object-Based Inquiry for the Multilingual Classroom.pptx

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

In this workshop, Field Museum educators and Chicago Public School teachers will share their experience using object-based learning in the classroom and how it sparks curiosity and language development in multilingual students. Field Museum educators will give an overview of the tenets of object-based inquiry and how it lends itself to giving equitable access to content for all students. Chicago Public School teachers will explain the practical application and benefits of using object-based learning in their multilingual classrooms and highlight how science ideas and language development occurs naturally through discussion, question-asking, and scientific drawing. During the hands-on workshop, participants will act as a learner in a guided object-based inquiry lesson that focuses on including everyday phenomena. Following the hands-on experience, they will have the opportunity to share how they would integrate object-based learning in their own curriculum. Participants will create their own collection of learning objects to use in their classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
Educators will learn how to merge science ideas with student ideas in their classroom using object-based phenomena to deepen students' questioning and observation skills. Educators will learn how to use object-based learning in their ELL or bilingual classrooms to promote language and content acquisition. Educators will learn how to use objects as hands-on learning tools to provide equitable learning opportunities for all.

SPEAKERS:
Mireya Becker (The Field Museum: Chicago, IL), Damaris Cami (Dual Language Teacher: Chicago, IL), Eleanor Sweeney (Educator: Chicago, IL), Andrea McGehee (Educator: Chicago, IL)

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