AAPT 2023 Winter Meeting - January 14-17
 

2022 Chicago National Conference - Sessions

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Displaying 20 results

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Using tools to sense and interact with the environment

McCormick Place - W193a

After learning about computational thinking, participants will apply the framework to determine where students engage in computational thinking within the activity. Participants will engage in activities where students engineer as part of the investigations. Participants will be able to use a pre-programmed microcontroller (loaned by the presenters) to experience 3 different short investigations each tied to a different phenomenon. 1) Does angle matter? How does the angle of the collector affect how warm it is? Using the microcontroller and lamps participants will collect data to build a model that explains why the tilt of the Earth creates different seasons. 2) Transparent, Translucent, and Opaque. When working in a greenhouse, different materials can be used to cover the greenhouse. Which is the best material for your area? Using the light level sensor on the microcontroller, participants test different materials to recommend their uses when designing a greenhouse. 3) Making an alarm - using the microcontroller accelerometer sensor, participants arm an alarm and see how the accelerometer works in three dimensions. Participants will be provided printed copies of the lesson plans and how to engage students with using the microcontrollers. Note that no knowledge of coding or any equipment brought is necessary to participate in this workshop.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn (1) Microcontrollers are small computers that come with several integrated sensors. Their functionality makes them useful for both investigations and engineering projects. Some of the basic functionality of different microcontrollers (2) One definition of computation thinking is how to use computers to solve problems. Computational thinking activities that connect students to everyday phenomena. The development of algorithms or the decomposition of problems into simple steps are just two examples of processes associated with computation thinking. It is a powerful problem-solving technique that is used in the modern world (3) How engineering tasks provide opportunities for student sensemaking

Speakers

Susan German (Hallsville Middle School: Hallsville, MO), G. Michael Bowen (Mount Saint Vincent University: Halifax, NS)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Using tools to sense and interact with the environment.pdf

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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Engineering for Us All: Exploring the "Why," "What," and "Who" of Engineering

McCormick Place - W194a

“You’re good at math; be an engineer.” Isn’t there more to it? Who is an engineer? Engineering helps society by solving problems. Let’s explore “why.”

Takeaways: Learn that engineering is more than math + science and take away classroom activities addressing engineering identity, ethics, and society (not your typical engineering activities).

Speakers

Ken Reid (University of Indianapolis: Indianapolis, IN)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Baseball card lesson
Baseball card lesson (complete)
Playpump lesson
Product archaeology lesson
Robot arm lesson (with materials list)
Shoe sole sketch and design lesson
Slides from presentation
More information on e4usa

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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STEM for All! Benefits of STEM Integration for Struggling to Gifted Learners, and Everyone in Between

McCormick Place - W187b

To effectively engage audience members, I will balance their readiness to learn, cognitive load, and stimulating activities. Using real-world examples, I will demonstrate the power of STEM in elementary classrooms to grow all learners and provide necessary 21st-century skills. Often STEM is an enrichment offered to high-achiever but struggling learners have even more to gain from STEM including confidence and leadership. I will focus on practical application, but valuable references and data will be included to support my practices. I will begin the session with a survey to identify the needs and perceptions of participants regarding STEM integration. Based on input, I will share research-based strategies, classroom integration examples, or dispel misconceptions. I will include an interactive STEM activity using index cards and paper clips to provide a STEM lesson model and demonstrate the ease of integrating STEM with simple, classroom supplies. Participants will leave the session with a better understanding of the benefits of STEM in K-5 classrooms and feel more comfortable integrating STEM into their own classrooms.

Takeaways: Participants will understand the value of STEM integration beyond the four letters of the acronym, including the benefits of productive struggle of high achievers and how the grit of struggling learners are paramount in the success of STEM challenges.

Speakers

Erika Neuman (Bulverde Creek Elementary School: San Antonio, TX)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

NSTA_STEMforALL.pdf

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Maximize the Benefits and Minimize the Challenges Associated with Embedding Engineering into the Science Curriculum using Argument-Driven Engineering

McCormick Place - W178b

This session is an introduction to a new approach to STEM instruction called Argument-Driven Engineering (ADE). ADE is an instructional approach that gives students an opportunity to learn to use core concepts and processes form science, engineering, and mathematics to figure out solutions to a meaningful and authentic problem that will help make the world a better place. This instructional approach also gives students an opportunity to develop disciplinary literacy skills (reading, writing, speaking, and listening) because they must obtain information, share and critique potential solutions through talk, and communicate what they figured out and how they know the solution is acceptable through writing. In this session, participants will examine the potential benefits and challenges associated with embedding engineering design into science classrooms and learn how the ADE instructional model can help maximize the benefits and reduce the challenges. Participants will also have a chance to experience an example of an ADE design challenge that invites them to design a shipping and storage container for insulin and see examples of how students who completed this design challenge used science, engineering, and mathematics content and processes to figure out how to keep the insulin cold for long periods of time. Participants will also learn about how this new approach was developed through three years of classroom-based research by a team of researchers at the University of Texas at Austin and how well ADE instructional materials are aligned with the TEKS for science, mathematics, CTE, and ELA.

Takeaways: • How to give students an opportunity to learn how to use concepts and processes from science, engineering, and mathematics to design a solution to an authentic problem that will help make the world a better place.

Speakers

Todd Hutner (The University of Alabama: Austin, TX)

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Crash Science: When Physics Meets Biology

McCormick Place - W185b-c

Use innovative video-assisted STEM activities, demonstrations, award-winning videos, and behind-the-crash-tests tours to teach the science of car crashes. Visit classroom.iihs.org for more information.

Takeaways: Participants learn how to incorporate culminating STEM design challenges (Project Pedestrian Sensors and Egg-Carrying Paper Car Crash) into their curriculum to promote student awareness and understanding of how engineering and technology are used to build safer vehicles.

Speakers

Griff Jones (University of Florida: No City, No State), Pini Kalnite (Insurance Institute for Highway Safety Highway Loss Data Institute: Arlington, VA)

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Chickenology: Food Delivery Challenge

McCormick Place - W179b

Participants will use sensemaking and the engineering design process to solve a real world food production problem in a small scale format. This lesson introduces the Food Delivery Challenge, in which participants must design a gravity feeder to carry food (chicken feed) to twelve hungry chickens for over 24 hours. To accomplish the task students must design and build a model of an efficient gravity feeder using the materials available to them. The scenario presented to the class: One of the feeders in your uncle’s barn has broken down, and a new one will not arrive until next month. You must create a gravity feeder to satisfy 12 chickens for 24 hours consistently to ensure the health of your flock. Participants will research, design, build and test their design before presenting to the group for feedback, Participants will then use the feedback to redesign for an improved feeder.

Takeaways: 1. Use the engineering design process to collaborate, design and build a gravitational feeder system that will feed 10 pounds of feed over a 24 hour period. 2. Present your design plan, and final product to the class for feedback. 3. Provide feedback to the design team for design improvement.

Speakers

Leah LaCrosse (McCormick Junior High School: Huron, OH), Heather Bryan (Education Projects, LLC: Columbus, OH)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Chickenology Food Delivery Challenge Lesson
Chickenology Student Rubric
Chickenology Food Delivery Challenge Slide Deck

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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The STEM of PBL

McCormick Place - W179b

Participants will understand how to develop and effectively implement STEM curriculum units that include project based activities and performance based assessments. Participants will learn to help students answer complex questions and develop solutions for challenges and real-world problems. They will also assist students with extending and refining their acquired knowledge to routinely analyze and solve problems. By the end of this session: 1) Participants will gain a clear and coherent understanding of what a STEM PBL is and how it works. 2) Participants will be able to identify and create effective essential questions. 3) Participants will be able to identify and apply the components of a STEM PBL. 4) Understand how STEM PBL’s will impact instruction for participants and students. Agenda: What is PBL? Why is it important? How does a STEM PBL Work? How to effectively integrate journal reflections. Ways to Implement STEM PBL’s

Takeaways: Participants will learn how to effectively implement STEM PBL’s (Project Based Learning) by integrating the components of STEM and PBL in order to grow students' capacity for creativity, fun, and back-loaded learning in a STEM context.

Speakers

Adero Carter (Clayton County Public Schools: Jonesboro, GA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

What Is PBL_ARTICLE.pdf
Why Is PBL Important_ARTICLE.pdf
Projects VS PBL.docx
_Main_Course.pdf
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2HyFVEpZyEY
STEM PBL in action
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1c38TeuqPSC-vS8GLiVXQH9GzI7g0sjbx/view?usp=sharing
STEM PBL in action
http://bit.ly/STEMPBLQA
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a487rcwqsLc
Guiding questions
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a487rcwqsLc
The Engineering Design Process/Journal Reflections

Thursday, July 21
5:10 PM - 5:40 PM
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Inspiration to Fruition

McCormick Place - W185a

Inspiration to Fruition provides any educator with a game plan on how to take an idea and available resources and create a project that enhances the student experience and skills.

Takeaways: 1. A template for designing a grassroots STEM or PBL project; 2. Top 10 tips on how to make managing the project actually manageable; and 3. Proof that trusting one's intuition to build a project based on an inspirational event can bring to fruition an amazing experience for students.

Speakers

Kelly Hartings (Indian Hill Middle School: Cincinnati, OH), Jessica Brown (Teacher: cincinnati, OH)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Inspiration to Fruition

Friday, July 22
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Unmasking Engineering Practices

McCormick Place - W175c

In this hands-on workshop, participants will make and preform tests on COVID masks to use engineering practices to design a mask that is both comfortable and protective.

Takeaways: Inquiry-based STEM is a collaborative process in which students act and think like engineers and scientists to make the learning environment inclusive for ALL learners.

Speakers

Karen Ostlund (The University of Texas at Austin: Austin, TX)

Friday, July 22
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Local Phenomenon-Based Projects

McCormick Place - W185d

Learn how to better integrate local phenomena into classroom learning through the use of long-term projects and a competition.

Takeaways: Strategies to use student-chosen local phenomena as the basis for long-term projects and participation in a national STEM competition.

Speakers

Winnie Boyle (Army Educational Outreach Program: , United States)

Friday, July 22
11:50 AM - 12:50 PM
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Increasing girls interest in STEM at the high school level through school wide STREAM programming

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 12

Explore how one all-girls school created and implemented a school-wide STREAM program. This session highlights our successes, failures, and outlines the program’s lasting positive impact.

Takeaways: In this session, we discuss our experiences in creating a transformative STREAM program designed to serve all students. This program assumes a mission centered approach to teaching Science, Math, Religion, Engineering, Art, and Math. We facilitate as students make connections across each of these disciplines with an emphasis on scientific observation, technological exploration, artful engineering design with the goal of solving relevant problems rooted in social justice. This session walks participants through our rationale of the STREAM program as well as our process from inception to realization. We discuss how schools can start or strengthen their own STEM, STREAM, or STREAM programs by outlining our success and failures and the lessons we learned throughout our experiences. Student work and feedback will be highlighted in addition to our plans for expanding our program in the future. We detail how this experience has changed us as educators and administrators - in particular regarding our views of inspirational teaching and learning. We also offer suggestions on how to broaden our community of STEM educators in order to lend support and resources as we all engage in this innovative way to help our students ask and answer important questions in their lives.

Speakers

Megan Leider (Resurrection College Prep High School: Chicago, IL)

Friday, July 22
11:50 AM - 12:50 PM
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STEM Integration for ALL Students in the Classroom

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 6

This hands-on workshop will excite and engage teachers of STEM disciplines using integration and inquiry to promote every student's confidence in the ability to challenge themselves in each discipline.

Takeaways: What does true STEM integration look like in an inclusive classroom?

Speakers

Bridget Pugh (Putnam County School System: Cookeville, TN)

Friday, July 22
11:50 AM - 12:50 PM
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Using Drones in the Classroom For Land and Crop Surveying Simulations

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 10

This session will lead participants through a discussion on why and how to use drone technology in the classroom. It will showcase a problem based learning activity in which drones are used in a surveying simulation.

Takeaways: How and why using drones can enhance the curriculum.

Speakers

Jane Hunt (Education Projects, LLC: Columbus, OH)

Friday, July 22
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Creating K-6 STEM Classrooms That Embrace Science Inquiry: Helping Students Think and Work Like Scientists - Exploring, Asking Questions, and Seeking Sense-Making of Scientific Phenomena

McCormick Place - W178a

Science inquiry is a powerful process and learning environment that embraces exploration and sense-making, as students question phenomena and explore real world science/STEM. Inquiry is an “attitude” that seeks understanding and continually questions how our natural world works. Student achievement, engagement, and sense-making of phenomena, increase when students are taught in an instructional environment that embraces inquiry, where students are encouraged to ask questions, gather evidence, seek answers, and formulate explanations. Speaker will discuss the many varied ways that inquiry manifests itself in the elementary STEM classroom, including ways to increase participation of ELL’s. She will actively engage participants, as she shares strategies and lesson ideas that promote inquiry, and as she demonstrates effective questioning, modeling how to guide students in their own questioning and explorations, as they gather data, formulate their explanations, and draw conclusions. Speaker will emphasize the importance of ‘testing’ the ‘known’, as well as the ‘unknown’, so students can validate their processes and thinking. Creating environments of inclusivity, collaboration, cooperation, and sharing of ideas will be emphasized. Participants will embrace the power that inquiry offers: content, strategies, process, engagement, and the desire to ask, answer, and understand scientific phenomena. This session will help teachers establish effective classroom practices, guiding students in understanding the ways scientists think and study our natural world, as teachers nurture students’ sustained curiosity and love of science/STEM. Handouts.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn how to create STEM classroom environments that fully embrace and create the inquiry process: emphasizing explorations, the formulation of questions to guide student inquiry and their understanding of scientific phenomena, the importance of collaborative sense-making and assuring the inclusivity of ALL students, the importance of assisting ELL’s with language accessibility, and the fulfillment of learner curiosity as part of the sense-making process and as a trajectory for guiding their continual learning.

Speakers

Donna Knoell (Educational and Technology Consultant: Overland Park, KS)

Friday, July 22
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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NSTA/ISTA Session- Bridging the Gap: Connecting STEM/Science Learning in CTE

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b

Student understanding of how science and STEM ideas and concepts are applied within their chosen career pathway is a critical component of many Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs, but for a variety of reasons these connections are often overlooked. Some states even provide CTE courses and Career Pathway standards that seem to go against the three-dimensional and student-centered learning grain. Yet, to truly meet the vision of the K-12 Framework, students in CTE and Vocational Education pathways should also be provided opportunities to engage in three-dimensional sensemaking in the context of their CTE course. In this session, we explore explicit connections between three-dimensional science learning and Agricultural, Food and Natural Resources as just one example of how three-dimensional student learning and sensemaking can be incorporated into CTE. We then explore how similar strategies can be utilized in other pathways with the goal of bridging the gap between science learning and practical application for students in CTE.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn strategies for integrating scientific sensemaking into CTE courses to support their students' mastery of the scientific concepts they will apply in those fields.

Speakers

Bridina Lemmer (Illinois Science Teaching Association: Jacksonville, IL), Chris Embry Mohr (Olympia High School: Stanford, IL)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Bridging the GAP

Friday, July 22
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Engineering/Entrepreneurship Curriculum for middle school students to pre-service teachers

McCormick Place - W175c

Think Tank to Shark Tank: Engineer to Entrepreneur is a free, ten-session project-based curriculum developed from a summer camp for middle school students. In the camp and curriculum, students work through developing a solution to a pain point (problem) they or loved ones interact with in life. Students develop a unique solution using the engineering design process, create a prototype, identify their potential customers, develop a business model and marketing strategy to present to local business leaders to provide guidance and support on market and opportunity realization. A facilitator or teacher may implement the curriculum in either a one-week experience with morning and afternoon sessions, a two-week experience, a ten-week after-school extra-curricular, or educators can choose elements to implement within a course throughout the academic year. The summer day camp, still in operation, runs for six hours a day for a five-day week with a break for lunch. Faculty use the curriculum to teach pre-service teachers in primary, middle, and high school to demonstrate the integration of engineering and entrepreneurship design principles into the classroom. During this interactive session, participants will gain access to this curriculum, and methods of integration into a pre-service teacher education course or program.

Takeaways: During this interactive session, participants will gain access to this curriculum, and methods of integration into a pre-service teacher education course or program.

Speakers

Karen Plaster (The University of Akron: Akron, OH)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

https://uakron.edu/education/think-tank/
Eng Ent NSTA Presentation.pptx

Saturday, July 23
9:20 AM - 10:20 AM
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Artemis Mission Activities: Landing Humans on the Moon

McCormick Place - W184d

Learn about NASA’s Next Gen STEM educator resources and how to join our first online community of practice for STEM educators (CONNECTS).

Takeaways: Educators will learn about future opportunities with NASA for student participation while completing a lunar lander design challenge.

Speakers

Lynn Dotson (NASA Office of STEM Engagement-Paragon TEC: Merritt Island, FL)

Saturday, July 23
9:20 AM - 10:20 AM
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Nourish the Future: Energy and Biofuels

McCormick Place - W196a

Students utilize different components (enzymes, yeast, feed stocks, and water) to produce ethanol and carbon dioxide through the process of fermentation. Students will develop a model of fermentation and explain how ethanol is made to answer the focus question "How can fermentation produce a renewable fuel source?" Students will develop experimental models to generate data in order to construct explanations about the relationships between the components of the fermentation process and to predict how those relationships can be manipulated to produce carbon dioxide. Students will design solutions to make the fermentation process as efficient as possible and generate the maximum amount of ethanol in a small bag environment Attendees will participate in hands-on activities centered around biofuel. Participants are going to prepare and compare different amounts of fermentation occurring in four different mixtures which will allow observations of production rates. A second activity focuses on a way to make a qualitative or quantitative explanation regarding the relationship between feed stock and glucose availability for ethanol production. Participants will deconstruct a model of starch to examine enzyme and starch reactions to determine how starches change into smaller molecules. Three additional hands-on activities that can be included in your classroom curriculum will be discussed.

Takeaways: Nourish the Future is a national education initiative developed by science teachers for science teachers to connect students to modern agriculture and provide sound science based resources that meet teacher and student needs in the classroom.

Speakers

Tiska Rodgers (Hayti High School: Hayti, MO), Leanne Thele (Perryville High School: No City, No State)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Nourish the Future Energy Biofuels slide deck
Nourish the Future Fermentation Factories Teacher Document
Nourish the Future Fermentation Factories Student Lesson

Saturday, July 23
11:50 AM - 12:50 PM
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STEM Integration for ALL Students in the Classroom

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 6

This hands-on workshop will excite and engage teachers of STEM disciplines using integration and inquiry to promote every student's confidence in the ability to challenge themselves in each discipline.

Takeaways: What does true STEM integration look like in an inclusive classroom?

Speakers

Bridget Pugh (Putnam County School System: Cookeville, TN)

Saturday, July 23
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Programming Simple Tools to Facilitate Science Inquiry Investigations

McCormick Place - W184d

Participants will learn about the framework for computational thinking and then learn to apply it to science inquiry investigations using Block Coding (used with students in elementary and middle school in many jurisdictions) and how it can be used to improve the conduct of science investigations (and be more like the investigations conducted by scientists).   Participants will apply the computational thinking framework to creating/modifying/using simple programs (either using a free online programming tool OR with a simple, inexpensive microcontroller that will be loaned by the presenters) that can be used in science inquiry investigations either for conducting the investigation (e.g., a random number generator) or for collecting data (e.g., a counter and a timer). Investigations where these can be used will be discussed and demonstrated. The use of the microcontrollers and/or a free online programming tool to develop a simple measurement tool provides participants (and their students) an opportunity to experience a simulated situation a scientist or engineer would face as they use computing tools to develop automated measuring responses.   Finally, as an example of what is known as “physical computing”, participants will learn to build (and will build if time allows) a physical interface (to use with a computer or Chromebook) that allows them to interact with a program they have either written or downloaded.   Participants will be provided printed copies of example lesson plans and instruction sheets on how to engage students with using the Scratch program and the microcontrollers). Note that no knowledge of coding or any equipment is necessary to participate in this workshop. 

Takeaways: Attendees will learn how computational thinking (applied to simple block coding examples and simple micro-controllers) can be used in science classrooms to help students conduct better inquiry investigations and better experience “authentic” science practices.

Speakers

G. Michael Bowen (Mount Saint Vincent University: Halifax, NS), Susan German (Hallsville Middle School: Hallsville, MO)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Programming Simple Tools to Facilitate Science Inquiry Investigations.pdf