2022 Chicago National Conference

July 21-23, 2022

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FILTERS APPLIED:Hands-On Workshop, Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL, Engineering

 

Rooms and times subject to change.
33 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Universal Design for Learning (UDL) - An Effective Approach to Ensuring an Inclusive Science Classroom

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

The Universal Design for Learning (UDL) Guidelines are a tool that can be used to design learning experiences that meet the needs of all learners (CAST, 2018). Instructional designers and teachers can use these principles to create learning environments that reduce barriers to access for all students, while keeping in mind the learning goals of the lesson. The three guiding principles of UDL are engagement, representation, and action and expression. In this session educators will be provided with examples of these principles in action in sample materials from OpenSciEd and classroom videos. In these examples, participating will identify how the materials have been purposefully designed with multiple avenues for engagement, representation, and action and expression. Additionally, they will identify the built-in supports for teachers to highlight student assets and to address potential barriers to learning for their local student population. Teachers will utilize a tool to help them analyze their own lessons to identify goals, potential barriers, and ways to use the UDL Principles to remove barriers and create flexible paths to learning.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will utilize a tool to help them analyze their own lessons to identify goals, potential barriers, and ways to use the UDL Principles to remove barriers and create flexible paths to learning.

SPEAKERS:
Sarah Delaney (OpenSciEd: San Carlos, CA)

Using tools to sense and interact with the environment

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W193a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Using tools to sense and interact with the environment.pdf

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

After learning about computational thinking, participants will apply the framework to determine where students engage in computational thinking within the activity. Participants will engage in activities where students engineer as part of the investigations. Participants will be able to use a pre-programmed microcontroller (loaned by the presenters) to experience 3 different short investigations each tied to a different phenomenon. 1) Does angle matter? How does the angle of the collector affect how warm it is? Using the microcontroller and lamps participants will collect data to build a model that explains why the tilt of the Earth creates different seasons. 2) Transparent, Translucent, and Opaque. When working in a greenhouse, different materials can be used to cover the greenhouse. Which is the best material for your area? Using the light level sensor on the microcontroller, participants test different materials to recommend their uses when designing a greenhouse. 3) Making an alarm - using the microcontroller accelerometer sensor, participants arm an alarm and see how the accelerometer works in three dimensions. Participants will be provided printed copies of the lesson plans and how to engage students with using the microcontrollers. Note that no knowledge of coding or any equipment brought is necessary to participate in this workshop.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn (1) Microcontrollers are small computers that come with several integrated sensors. Their functionality makes them useful for both investigations and engineering projects. Some of the basic functionality of different microcontrollers (2) One definition of computation thinking is how to use computers to solve problems. Computational thinking activities that connect students to everyday phenomena. The development of algorithms or the decomposition of problems into simple steps are just two examples of processes associated with computation thinking. It is a powerful problem-solving technique that is used in the modern world (3) How engineering tasks provide opportunities for student sensemaking

SPEAKERS:
Susan German (Hallsville Middle School: Hallsville, MO), G. Michael Bowen (Mount Saint Vincent University: Halifax, NS)

Dog Mode Design Challenge

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W185a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Dog Mode Slide Deck

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Introducing students to real-world engineering problems is a key component to engaging them in the science classroom. In this project, students solve the problem of saving pets from a hot car. Many students are aware of this issue and would have many ideas on how this could be achieved. This projects gives them the tools to help solve such a problem by building a model and finding a solution. Participants in this session will get to build the model themselves to see how information from sensors (input) can determine what should be done (output) through simple lines of code. No coding or engineering experience is needed, just imagination and logical thinking. Projects like these can expose students to STEM Careers. The exposure to coding and engineering design can also get them interested in doing more in the STEM field.

TAKEAWAYS:
Solve a real-work problem with coding and engineering design - no prior experience needed.

SPEAKERS:
Jessica Kohout (Educational Consultant: Voorhees, NJ), Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA)

Supporting Civically Engaged Argument Writing in Science and Technology Classrooms

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W178b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Guided Session Notes and Resources

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Participants will use a graphic organizer to record their thinking as I describe a unit I taught in which students in grades 9-12 explored issues related to artificial intelligence. Students crafted op-Eds advocating for what we should do in our community about emerging technologies like driverless cars and facial recognition. As I describe the unit, I will highlight how I (1) kicked off the unit with a phenomenon that raised questions about convenience, safety, security, equity, and justice; (2) layered on texts and encouraged students to grapple with multiple perspectives on AI-related issues; (3) used routines and mentor texts to support students in crafting claims and connecting evidence to their claims; and (4) engaged students in processes of revision. Then, participants will work in self-selected groups to explore science/technology/society text sets on topics like lab grown meat and space debris. As they explore the text set, they will engage with a classroom routine to develop a compelling, debatable, defensible, and nuanced claim. Participants will share what they discovered as they explored the text set and wrote claims in their group and will reflect on how these text sets and routines might become part of their classroom practice.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn about freely available text sets and classroom routines developed by teachers for supporting civically engaged argument writing about science and technology issues in society.

SPEAKERS:
John Smith (Chester A Arthur School: Philadelphia, PA)

Engineering Severe Weather Solutions

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W176c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Sever Weather Slide Deck

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Human activities have caused changes in global temperature and weather patterns. This generation of students will need to understand climate science in order to adapt to this changing environment. In this session, participants will explore a project in which students incorporate engineering and basic coding - no experience necessary. We will use micro:bit technology to connect basic coding commands to collect authentic data using embedded sensors. Participants will use this collected data to modify design solutions based on human vulnerabilities to severe weather. Participants will find ways to expose their students to the engineering capabilities needed to solve problems. This project allows students to compare design solutions to identify which is best for the problem at hand and experience the interactive process of evaluating solutions. This project allows for the authentic integration of technology, mathematics, crosscutting concepts, science practices, and easy implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards.

TAKEAWAYS:
Use technology to expose students to coding and engineering design solutions for severe weather.

SPEAKERS:
Jessica Kohout (Educational Consultant: Voorhees, NJ), Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA)

STEM for All! Benefits of STEM Integration for Struggling to Gifted Learners, and Everyone in Between

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W187b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA_STEMforALL.pdf

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

To effectively engage audience members, I will balance their readiness to learn, cognitive load, and stimulating activities. Using real-world examples, I will demonstrate the power of STEM in elementary classrooms to grow all learners and provide necessary 21st-century skills. Often STEM is an enrichment offered to high-achiever but struggling learners have even more to gain from STEM including confidence and leadership. I will focus on practical application, but valuable references and data will be included to support my practices. I will begin the session with a survey to identify the needs and perceptions of participants regarding STEM integration. Based on input, I will share research-based strategies, classroom integration examples, or dispel misconceptions. I will include an interactive STEM activity using index cards and paper clips to provide a STEM lesson model and demonstrate the ease of integrating STEM with simple, classroom supplies. Participants will leave the session with a better understanding of the benefits of STEM in K-5 classrooms and feel more comfortable integrating STEM into their own classrooms.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will understand the value of STEM integration beyond the four letters of the acronym, including the benefits of productive struggle of high achievers and how the grit of struggling learners are paramount in the success of STEM challenges.

SPEAKERS:
Erika Neuman (University of Texas at San Antonio: No City, No State)

Science + Engineering + Math = Parachute STEM Activity

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W181a


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

The basic physical science principles of gravitational force and air resistance are explored as students design, build, test, and evaluate parachutes. K-W-L charts are used to assess students’ knowledge of the engineering design process and the scientific method. The book, “Mercedes and the Chocolate Pilot” by Margot Theis Ravin, is read to students and they discuss whether the pilot acted like an engineer as he wanted to share sweets with children during the Berlin Airlift. The students are presented with a problem, getting food and water to islanders whose homes and roads have been damaged by hurricanes. Simple materials such as paper napkins, paper towels, crocheting thread, and paper clips are used to build the parachutes. The students use the five ‘E’s’: engagement, exploration, explanation, evaluation, and elaboration as they compare their various parachute models. Students learn that air contains particles, and it is these particles that place forces on bodies moving in the air and counteract the force of gravity. Students use math in the analysis of their models. Students learn that models representing parachutes can be designed in many ways and may behave differently when tested. Students learn the many ways engineering and science are used to explore and explain nature and are employed in manufacturing and technology processes.

TAKEAWAYS:
Student groups learn that the engineering design process and the scientific method are circular processes as they design, build, test, and evaluate a parachute model then improve it.

SPEAKERS:
Suzanne Cunningham (Purdue University: West Lafayette, IN)

Hexagonal Thinking in the Science Classroom

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W185d


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Hexagonal Thinking ensures the learning environment features a high degree of student engagement by providing a framework for academic discussion where all students participate. Participants will collaborate with colleagues to experience Hexagonal Thinking using science and math content vocabulary and visuals that will then be used to synthesize information into a piece of critical writing.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn a strategy for making thinking, learning and content connections visible in the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Michelle Yates (Aledo ISD: Aledo, TX), Miranda Rosenhoover (Aledo ISD: Aledo, TX)

Chickenology: Food Delivery Challenge

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W179b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Chickenology Food Delivery Challenge Lesson
Chickenology Food Delivery Challenge Slide Deck
Chickenology Student Rubric

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Participants will use sensemaking and the engineering design process to solve a real world food production problem in a small scale format. This lesson introduces the Food Delivery Challenge, in which participants must design a gravity feeder to carry food (chicken feed) to twelve hungry chickens for over 24 hours. To accomplish the task students must design and build a model of an efficient gravity feeder using the materials available to them. The scenario presented to the class: One of the feeders in your uncle’s barn has broken down, and a new one will not arrive until next month. You must create a gravity feeder to satisfy 12 chickens for 24 hours consistently to ensure the health of your flock. Participants will research, design, build and test their design before presenting to the group for feedback, Participants will then use the feedback to redesign for an improved feeder.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Use the engineering design process to collaborate, design and build a gravitational feeder system that will feed 10 pounds of feed over a 24 hour period. 2. Present your design plan, and final product to the class for feedback. 3. Provide feedback to the design team for design improvement.

SPEAKERS:
Leah LaCrosse (McCormick Junior High School: Huron, OH), Heather Bryan (Nourish the Future - Education Projects, LLC: Columbus, OH)

Geometric String Art: Something for Everyone!

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W180



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Geometric String Art.pdf

STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

During this session, I will provide participants with black card stock, needles, string, graph paper and tape. We will start by creating the artwork as this will fuel the discussion later. I will walk participants through the steps using a guided slideshow with pictures. They will be given multiple options and allowed to experiment with their selections. I will give them time to work at their tables to create their art and walk around to help. The discussion portion will happen after the art creation. I will ask the groups to share their art with their table. The valuable portion of the session is when we will brainstorm the modifications that can be done to help all students access this activity. I will ask groups to discuss and share out as I create a list. I will add any modifications not already mentioned. Next, I would like the groups to discuss how this can be used in their classes, including the modifications they would need to suit their students. As a take away, participants will have a note taking sheet, access to the slideshow (includes examples and instructions), list of supplies needed and where to purchase, their beautiful artwork, and valuable discussions.

TAKEAWAYS:
In addition to the art work, participants will leave with ideas, templates and modifications for a variety of students.

SPEAKERS:
Terri Serey (Orange Grove Middle School: Hacienda Heights, CA)

Dumpster Dive with STEM

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W175c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Dumpster Dive With STEM Participant Folder

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Connect the human impact of trash pollution to engineering design. Get your students thinking critically and creatively as they collaborate in real-world problem-solving. The global real-world issue of human-generated trash polluting local bodies of water is the main focus of this hands-on session. Using our partnership with the Howard County Conservancy, our students learn about their local watersheds and contribute to a Watershed Report Card. Students see how trash that is often found on our local schoolyards can affect our watershed, and they design a working model for trash removal in a local tributary. Basic coding will be used to design programs that will control sensors and motors through a microcontroller, thus removing the trash from the water source. The model will utilize solar and water power to move the trash into a separate receptacle. Various sensors will also be used to monitor water levels and determine the outcome of the program. This session will allow participants to find ways to increase the environmental stewardship of their students while incorporating engineering design into the science classroom. This project allows authentic integration of technology, mathematics, crosscutting concepts, science practices, and easy implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards.

TAKEAWAYS:
Design a project that enhances STEM skills in students such as collaboration, curiosity and creative problem solving.

SPEAKERS:
Jessica Kohout (Educational Consultant: Voorhees, NJ), Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA)

Using Picture Book to Inspire STEM Learning, K–5

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375c


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Learn how to integrate STEM and literacy through the use of high-quality STEM-related picture books.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn strategies for integrating STEM and literacy through the use of picture books in the K–5 classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Kim Stilwell (BIOZONE Corp.: Parker, CO)

Exploration Generation: Sensemaking in Rocketry from AIAA, Estes Rockets, and NSTA

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Exploration Generation: Sensemaking in Rocketry Collection

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

This session will introduce participants to the Exploration Generation Middle School NSTA Playlist. It provides equitable STEM experiences to students and increases educator confidence in teaching rocketry. This two-lesson playlist brings Sensemaking to rocketry by cultivating student curiosity about rockets to drive learning about science ideas related to physics topics. Participants will investigate forces through hands-on engagement, while also learning about rocket safety. Learn how to develop critical skills within your students to prepare them for the careers of tomorrow.

TAKEAWAYS:
The excitement and curiosity generated by model rocket launches can be used to drive student learning about a variety of physical science ideas.

SPEAKERS:
Michelle Phillips (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Patrice Scinta (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Nicole Bayeur (Estes Industries: , United States)

Meet Me in the Middle, Lite: A Share-a-Thon

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W183b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
UIC Teacher Fellows Info
Informational Flyer on Teacher Fellows program to develop classroom learning companion robots

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Engage in a variety of activities, collect information and resources, and network with middle level leaders. Discover new ideas and materials that you can use next week.

TAKEAWAYS:
The participants will network with other middle level science educators and leaders to discover and engage in activities that will expand their knowledge and be usable in all aspects of their work.

SPEAKERS:
Mary Lou Lipscomb (National Middle Level Science Teachers Association: Naperville, IL), Alison Seymour (Science Teacher: Winchester, 0), Carey Dieleman (National Science Teaching Association: No City, No State), Loris Chen (Science Education Consultant: Fair Lawn, NJ), Cynthia Crockett (Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian: Cambridge, MA), Suzanne Cunningham (Purdue University: West Lafayette, IN), Katy Garvey (The Source for Learning, Inc.: Reston, VA), Nicole Green (Animalearn: Jenkintown, PA), Joseph Michaelis (University of Illinois Chicago: Chicago, IL), Kim Nagle (Brooks Middle School: Bolingbrook, IL), Cori Nelson (Winfield School District 34: Winfield, IL), Anne Schoeffler (Seton Catholic School: Hudson, OH), Dennis Schatz (Institute for Learning Innovation: Beaverton, OR), Alison Seymour (Science Teacher: Winchester, 0), Corydon Strawser (Lake Nona Middle School: Orlando, FL), Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA), Barbara Phillips-Bredlow (Northeast Nodaway School District: Ravenwood, MO), Dawn Konieczny (Brooks Middle School: Bolingbrook, IL), Erin Towns (Edward Little High School: Auburn, ME)

Unmasking Engineering Practices

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W175c


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

In this hands-on workshop, participants will make and preform tests on COVID masks to use engineering practices to design a mask that is both comfortable and protective.

TAKEAWAYS:
Inquiry-based STEM is a collaborative process in which students act and think like engineers and scientists to make the learning environment inclusive for ALL learners.

SPEAKERS:
Karen Ostlund (The University of Texas at Austin: Austin, TX)

Local Phenomenon-Based Projects

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W185d


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Learn how to better integrate local phenomena into classroom learning through the use of long-term projects and a competition.

TAKEAWAYS:
Strategies to use student-chosen local phenomena as the basis for long-term projects and participation in a national STEM competition.

SPEAKERS:
Winnie Boyle (NSTA: No City, No State)

NGSS-Focused Summative Classroom Assessments of Three-Dimensional Learning

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W185a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NGSS Summative Assessments_NSTA_Chicago_2022.pdf

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Explore classroom-tested benchmark assessments and scoring guides you can use to assess students’ three-dimensional learning related to middle school performance expectations.

TAKEAWAYS:
Educators will learn about a comprehensive set of free, summative benchmark 3-D assessments designed to be used in any NGSS-focused middle school classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Maia Binding (The Lawrence Hall of Science: Berkeley, CA), Wendy Jackson (The Lawrence Hall of Science: Berkeley, CA)

Discussion-Based Learning: How to Use Talk as a Tool

Friday, July 22 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

Academic discourse is a vital part of promoting student sensemaking. Learn how discourse can be used to promote equity and access in the science classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how to use discussion strategies in the classroom to move student thinking forward, use talk as a formative assessment, and build a classroom culture that promotes student discussion.

SPEAKERS:
Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Cheryl Knight (Orland Junior High School: Orland Park, IL)

The Egg Drop Meets 2020

Friday, July 22 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W176c


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Participants will design and test a vessel that will land an egg dropped from a substantial heights without breaking the egg. Participants will use a variety of materials to provide the softest landing possible. Participants will employ technology to assist them in designing their vessels and shape their final methods.

TAKEAWAYS:
Design and test an egg vessel with real time data. Analyze live data to better design a successful egg drop vessel. Experience the engineering design process. - Using technology to test prototypes. -employing the engineering design process. -applying modern technology to past challenges.

SPEAKERS:
Brad Posnanski (Comsewogue High School: Port Jefferson Station, NY), Todd Graba (Crystal Lake South High School: Crystal Lake, IL)

Problem Centered Teaching by Tomorrow

Saturday, July 23 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W193a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Presentation Link

STRAND: Learn and Lead: Developing a Community for Expanded Participation in Science and STEM

Show Details

Problem centered instruction is a great way to engage students, integrate content, inspire learning, and naturally incorporate all three dimensions of the NRC Framework. However, true problem centered instruction requires a major shift in both teaching and learning, requiring the one thing teachers don't have: time--the last thing teachers need is another pedagogical strategy that disrupts their entire routine. Teachers will have the opportunity to voice their concerns and discuss some barriers of problem centered teaching and learning, while also addressing the benefits for both teachers and students. Considering the benefits, there are some immediate changes that teachers can use to help shift to a problem centered environment. Recalling that problem centered learning should be complex, meaningful, and open-ended, the four strategies are: 1) Make the Content Relatable, 2) Structure: Less is More, 3) Be a Resource, Not an Answer Key, and 4) Use a Problem to Introduce a Topic. Teachers will then have an opportunity to put the strategies to immediate use by picking a lesson or topic and work with others to transform it into a three-dimensional, problem centered lesson.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will explore four strategies that promote three-dimensional learning through the process of problem centered instruction that is complex, meaningful, and open-ended. They will discuss benefits and barriers to the problem centered approach from the perspective of both the instructor and the learner. Teachers will have an opportunity to brainstorm and work collaboratively on transforming a lesson or topic of their choice into a problem centered, reality based scenario that seamlessly integrates the Science and Engineering Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Disciplinary Core Ideas.

SPEAKERS:
Cassandra Armstrong (Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy: Aurora, IL)

NASA Space Technology: Robotics and the International Space Station

Saturday, July 23 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

McCormick Place - W185d


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

This session highlights an activity from NASA’s Learning Launchers: Robotics (https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/stem-on-station/learning_launchers_robotics) teacher toolkit part of a series of Educator Guides with lessons and activities to help bring the International Space Station into the classroom. This session will focus on the “I Want to Hold Your Hand” activity that engages participants to build and test a robotic-like hand and understand how NASA uses robotic explorers to collect information about places where humans cannot travel. After watching videos "Robotics and the International Space Station" & "Benefits For Humanity: From Space to Surgery" participants will work in teams to construct a robotic-like hand and test their robotic hand by picking up an empty soda can or other lightweight objects. The “I Want to Hold Your Hand Activity” is aligned to national standards for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) (i.e., NGSS, ISTE). The focus of the “I Want to Hold Your Hand” activity ties Engineering Design and NGSS science and engineering practices of defining problems, developing models, and planning and carrying out investigations. This session connects participants to how NASA uses robots in many ways as well as benefit humanity with its robots’ doing science and experiments aboard the International Space Station.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Attendees will explore NASA STEM Educator Guides that are standards-aligned and provide detailed information and resources on how to implement NASA STEM engagement learning experiences in the classroom. 2. Attendees will gain hands-on minds-on experience with implementing a NASA STEM engagement activity in their classroom using everyday materials that encourages students to construct a robotic-like hand and demonstrate how data are collected when using robotic technology. 3. Attendees will gain insights into how humans and robots are working hand in hand to expand the horizons of space exploration and how robotic research that has helped make advances in medicine, auto manufacturing, among other things. Without robotics, major accomplishments like the building the International Space Station, repairing satellites in space, and exploring other worlds would not be possible.

SPEAKERS:
LaTina Taylor (NASA Educator Professional Development Collaborative (EPDC): Flossmoor, IL)

Artemis Mission Activities: Landing Humans on the Moon

Saturday, July 23 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

McCormick Place - W184d


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Learn about NASA’s Next Gen STEM educator resources and how to join our first online community of practice for STEM educators (CONNECTS).

TAKEAWAYS:
Educators will learn about future opportunities with NASA for student participation while completing a lunar lander design challenge.

SPEAKERS:
Lynn Dotson (NASA Office of STEM Engagement-GoH: Kennedy Space Center, FL)

Crash Science Inquiry: Investigating Distracted Driving Dangers

Saturday, July 23 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

McCormick Place - W181a


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Complete a distracted driving simulation and discover free award-winning videos, STEM activities, and real-world applications exploring science, engineering, and vehicle crashworthiness. Free lesson plans included.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how scientific and engineering principles can be modeled in classrooms using crash science–related videos and activities to promote safer personal behaviors when riding in or driving a vehicle.

SPEAKERS:
Griff Jones (University of Florida: No City, No State), Pini Kalnite (Insurance Institute for Highway Safety Highway Loss Data Institute: Arlington, VA)

Nourish the Future: Energy and Biofuels

Saturday, July 23 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

McCormick Place - W196a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Nourish the Future Energy Biofuels slide deck
Nourish the Future Fermentation Factories Student Lesson
Nourish the Future Fermentation Factories Teacher Document

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Students utilize different components (enzymes, yeast, feed stocks, and water) to produce ethanol and carbon dioxide through the process of fermentation. Students will develop a model of fermentation and explain how ethanol is made to answer the focus question "How can fermentation produce a renewable fuel source?" Students will develop experimental models to generate data in order to construct explanations about the relationships between the components of the fermentation process and to predict how those relationships can be manipulated to produce carbon dioxide. Students will design solutions to make the fermentation process as efficient as possible and generate the maximum amount of ethanol in a small bag environment Attendees will participate in hands-on activities centered around biofuel. Participants are going to prepare and compare different amounts of fermentation occurring in four different mixtures which will allow observations of production rates. A second activity focuses on a way to make a qualitative or quantitative explanation regarding the relationship between feed stock and glucose availability for ethanol production. Participants will deconstruct a model of starch to examine enzyme and starch reactions to determine how starches change into smaller molecules. Three additional hands-on activities that can be included in your classroom curriculum will be discussed.

TAKEAWAYS:
Nourish the Future is a national education initiative developed by science teachers for science teachers to connect students to modern agriculture and provide sound science based resources that meet teacher and student needs in the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Tiska Rodgers (Clarkton High School: Clarkton, MO), Leanne Thele (Perryville High School: , MO)

Maker-Centered Learning in the Early Years

Saturday, July 23 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W175c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Maker Centered Learning screen 072322.pptx
Resources for Maker Centered Learning in the Early Years.docx

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Research shows many benefits of a maker-centered learning environment, however many teachers do not consider their classroom “maker classrooms” In this hands-on workshop, participants will see many different categories of making in an early years class, which allows participants to begin to reframe their view of their own classes. Through hands-on activities, participants experience a range of maker-centered learning activities which showcases how these activities can be used to develop problem solving and sensemaking for students, with built in modifications support MLL and students with special rights. Literacy development and formative assessments are also continuous threads in maker-centered learning as students learn and use language in the making process. Through observation and discussion of maker-made artifacts, and the processes leading to these artifacts, teachers can assess student understanding Furthermore, with many maker-centered activities, family and community connections are strengthened as students observe their own community, ask questions, and involve others outside of school in their making activities. Conference activities will be limited to portable, lightweight materials, with discussions and examples of different materials in action

TAKEAWAYS:
1) Discover new making opportunities to support sensemaking in your class while developing student skills in communication, collaboration as well as identifying and solving problems 2) Identify ways of integrating maker centered opportunities in your class planning, with specific attention to the early years 3) Observe different ways of bringing family’s funds of knowledge into a maker centered classroom

SPEAKERS:
Anne Lowry (Aleph Academy: Reno, NV)

Artemis: NASA's Missions to the Moon & Mars

Saturday, July 23 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W186c


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Attendees will be provided with a high-level overview of NASA’s Artemis Missions to the Moon and Mars, Next Generation Science Standards, and gain insights on how Engineering Design fits within the NGSS. This session highlights an activity from NASA’s Next Gen STEM - Moon to Mars Educator Guide titled, "Landing Humans on the Moon" (https://www.nasa.gov/stem-ed-resources/landing-humans-on-the-moon.html) which is part of a series of standards-aligned educator guides designed to help students reach their potential to join the next-generation STEM workforce and learn about sending humans to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. The focus of the “Safe Landing on the Lunar Surface” activity engages participants to understand how a spacecraft’s engines can provide downward thrust to counteract the force of gravity not only at launch, but also during a landing to slow its descent. Utilizing the engineering design process attendees will use household materials to better understand the difficulties in landing a lander on the surface of a terrestrial body that does not have an atmosphere (no atmospheric braking, no use of parachutes, and no aerodynamic control surfaces). Participants will design, build, and improve a model of a lunar lander that can slow its descent using the downward thrust of a balloon; graph the speed with respect to elevation of a model lunar lander.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Attendee will explore NASA STEM Educator Guides that are standards-aligned and provide detailed information and resources on how to implement STEM engagement learning experiences in the classroom to help students learn about sending humans to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. 2. Attendees will gain hand on minds on experience with implementing NASA STEM engagement activities in their classroom. Then, using engineering design principles, attendees will mirror the process that NASA engineers follow to brainstorm a human lander design, ultimately building an actual model that they will test. 3. Participants will gain insights into the difficulties in landing a lander on the surface of a terrestrial body that does not have an atmosphere (no atmospheric braking, no use of parachutes, and no aerodynamic control surfaces).

SPEAKERS:
LaTina Taylor (NASA Educator Professional Development Collaborative (EPDC): Flossmoor, IL)

Programming Simple Tools to Facilitate Science Inquiry Investigations

Saturday, July 23 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W184d



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Programming Simple Tools to Facilitate Science Inquiry Investigations.pdf

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

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Participants will learn about the framework for computational thinking and then learn to apply it to science inquiry investigations using Block Coding (used with students in elementary and middle school in many jurisdictions) and how it can be used to improve the conduct of science investigations (and be more like the investigations conducted by scientists).   Participants will apply the computational thinking framework to creating/modifying/using simple programs (either using a free online programming tool OR with a simple, inexpensive microcontroller that will be loaned by the presenters) that can be used in science inquiry investigations either for conducting the investigation (e.g., a random number generator) or for collecting data (e.g., a counter and a timer). Investigations where these can be used will be discussed and demonstrated. The use of the microcontrollers and/or a free online programming tool to develop a simple measurement tool provides participants (and their students) an opportunity to experience a simulated situation a scientist or engineer would face as they use computing tools to develop automated measuring responses.   Finally, as an example of what is known as “physical computing”, participants will learn to build (and will build if time allows) a physical interface (to use with a computer or Chromebook) that allows them to interact with a program they have either written or downloaded.   Participants will be provided printed copies of example lesson plans and instruction sheets on how to engage students with using the Scratch program and the microcontrollers). Note that no knowledge of coding or any equipment is necessary to participate in this workshop. 

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how computational thinking (applied to simple block coding examples and simple micro-controllers) can be used in science classrooms to help students conduct better inquiry investigations and better experience “authentic” science practices.

SPEAKERS:
G. Michael Bowen (Mount Saint Vincent University: Halifax, NS), Susan German (Hallsville Middle School: Hallsville, MO)

DIY Digital Interactive Notebooking

Saturday, July 23 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W183b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/16a_AiBztWiON2awmsWMd0b2t9v38sgubMxBB_OVxHRI/edit?usp=sharing

STRAND: Adapting Virtual Learning to Increase Access and Participation in a Face-to-Face Classroom

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Are you used to having your students keep a notebook, but aren’t sure how to transition it into a digital version? Have you ever wanted to try an Interactive Notebook but don’t know where to start? Are you having trouble keeping your students organized in the digital school world? Interactive Notebooks are a meaningful way to transfer a student’s learning, practice, and reflection into an engaging digital environment. Research has shown that benefits range from allowing students space to record and reflect on their experiences, guiding teacher instruction, and providing more opportunities for differentiation. As classes have shifted between in-person, hybrid, and completely online instruction, digital learning options are becoming an even more necessary part of our curriculum. During this workshop, you will learn about different types of digital notebooks, their uses/benefits, and how to find or create your own resources for student use. By converting an interactive notebook into a digital notebook, students can now access multi-media resources all in one place creating opportunities for greater flexibility and autonomy in learning.

TAKEAWAYS:
Create and manage digital notebooks resources from materials you already use.

SPEAKERS:
Joy Barnes-Johnson (Princeton High School: Princeton, NJ), Mridula Bajaj (Mount Laurel Schools: Mount Laurel, NJ), Shefali Mehta (Princeton High School: Princeton, NJ)

Using CERs and CEJs to Develop Student Discourse and Discussion

Saturday, July 23 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W176a


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

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Come learn how to teach in three dimensions and advance students’ scientific literacy by strategically applying the use of CERs and CEJs in your classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
After this session, participants will be able to identify opportunities for using CERs and CEJs to facilitate student discourse and discussion and apply what they have learned to their own classroom.

SPEAKERS:
McKenna Serowka (Lake Zurich High School: Lake Zurich, IL)

NASA STEM: Computational Thinking: Crew Transportation with Orion

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W175a


STRAND: No Strand

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The free NASA STEM lesson plans introduce the practice of computational thinking and include elements of a real NASA mission. NASA’s Artemis program will return humans to the lunar surface for the first time since 1972, the year of the agency's last Apollo moon landing. This Educator Guide provides four standards-aligned activities to help students learn about NASA's Orion spacecraft that will take astronauts to the Moon and beyond. In this session, we will design and build a crew module model that will secure two 2-cm astronaut figures during a drop test. The PowerPoint will be available to all participants. The PowerPoint will include the videos and activities including the tips and pointers. Session Outline: 5 min - Welcome and Introduction to NASA Artemis Mission 10 min- STEM Engagement strategies and culturally relevant teaching 10 min- Introducing the Engineering Design Challenge 20 min- Teams Design a Crew Vehicle 10 min- Testing the Crew Vehicle 5 min- Reviewing the Resources and Q and A https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/np-2020-02-2805-hq.pdf

TAKEAWAYS:
NASA provides free educational resources that include educator guides with standards-aligned activities to help students use computational thinking while including elements of real NASA missions.

SPEAKERS:
Susan Kohler (NASA Glenn Research Center: Cleveland, OH)

Designing Escape Boxes

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W183b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Designing Escape Boxes--PDF Version
This PowerPoint (in PDF format) describes how to Design Escape Boxes and contains a link to all the workshop documents in Google Drive. To edit any of the Google Drive materials, click on File > Make a Copy.
Designing Escape Boxes--PPT Version
This PowerPoint describes how to Design Escape Boxes and contains a link to all the workshop documents in Google Drive. To edit any of the Google Drive materials, click on File > Make a Copy.

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Turn any multiple-choice review into an exciting escape! Learn to create digital and in-person escapes to help keep students interested, engaged, and motivated.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn tips for designing escape boxes, plus how to add riddles, puzzles, games, and small prizes. The digital escape uses Google Forms, and the physical escape uses lockable boxes with resettable combination locks. Links to a customizable digital and physical escape will be available to attendees.

SPEAKERS:
Sharon Beck (Davidson County High School: Lexington, NC)

NASA's Newest X-plane: "X-57 -- It's Electrifying!"

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W193a


STRAND: No Strand

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Did you know that every U.S. aircraft flying today, and every U.S. air traffic control facility, uses NASA-developed technology in some way? Participants in this session will gain insights into how NASA Aeronautics work to make aviation truly sustainable by reducing delays and environmental impacts, transforming aviation efficiency and safety, while reducing noise, fuel use, harmful emissions, and ultimately transform the way we fly. NASA’s X-57 Maxwell is an experimental aircraft designed to test operating multiple electric motors for use in turning propellers – an idea known as “distributed electric propulsion.” This session highlights an activity from NASA’s “X-57 Electric Airplane: STEM Learning Module” (https://www.nasa.gov/aeroresearch/stem/X57 ) part of a series of Educator Guides with lessons and activities to help students learn about NASA’s X-57 Maxwell and the science behind electric propulsion. This session will focus on the “X-57 Maxwell: Circuits Activity Guide” that engages participants to build a light-up paper helicopter by creating a “parallel circuit” that uses copper foil tape, two LED lights, and a battery. This session’s goals are to demonstrate that an all-electric airplane is more efficient, quieter, and more environmentally friendly. Session participants will understand that knowledge gained from the X-57 Maxwell research will help engineers design future electric-powered aircraft for everything from urban air mobility to moving passengers and cargo between nearby cities.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Attendees will explore NASA STEM Educator Guides that are standards-aligned and provide detailed information and resources on how to implement NASA STEM engagement learning experiences in the classroom. 2. Hands-on minds-on experience with implementing a NASA STEM activity in their classroom that encourages students to create a parallel circuit on a paper helicopter as an introduction to circuitry and propulsion. 3. Attendees will gain insights into how NASA’s X-57 Maxwell all-electric airplane is more efficient, quieter, and more environmentally friendly while gaining a better understanding of the STEM concepts of energy transfer, and the physical science of pressure and aerodynamics.

SPEAKERS:
LaTina Taylor (NASA Educator Professional Development Collaborative (EPDC): Flossmoor, IL)

Our Beautiful Planet: Climate Change Films and Lessons from NSTA, The Climate Initiative, and Kikim Media

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Our Beautiful Planet: Climate Change Films and Lessons from NSTA, The Climate In

STRAND: No Strand

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This session will introduce participants to Our Beautiful Planet, a collection of classroom-ready films and lesson plans that highlight the science and engineering practices scientists use to explain the phenomenon of climate change. The collection of over 10 lessons brings Sensemaking to environmental science by cultivating student curiosity with engaging and eye-popping phenomena. Participants will generate questions and use model data as evidence to construct an explanation of how increases in global temperature could shift infection rates of mosquito-borne diseases. Using their explanation and information provided in the film, participants will consider the effect of this shift on humans.

TAKEAWAYS:
Providing students with an engaging and relevant phenomenon can be used to drive student learning about climate change and inspire them to examine critical climate issues in their own communities.

SPEAKERS:
Patrice Scinta (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Holly Hereau (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

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