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2022 Chicago National Conference - Sessions

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Displaying 16 results

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Intergrated Project and Inquiry Based High School Science Curriculum

McCormick Place - W175c

Explore curriculum of a 10th grade integrated chemistry and biology course that was designed to incorporate the Next Generation Science Standards while placing importance on the Science and Engineering Practices. The course follows the narrative: “Living systems obey the laws of physics and chemistry. Transformations in matter occur in predictable ways and are a function of molecular shape and molecular collisions. Chemical properties are the result of the arrangement of elements and the forces between them. Reception, sequestration, and transfer of chemical elements allow living systems to leverage chemical transformations to survive, grow, and reproduce. Reproduction allows for the transmission of these traits from one generation to the next. Pressures from the environment favors some traits over others which in turn produces new species over time and is responsible for the diversity of all life.” Students were introduced to content via phenomenon and then engaged with the DCIs, Cross-cutting concepts, and SEPs while working towards a culminating project. For example, students learned various topics of chemistry including stoichiometry and gas laws to design and build a functional Class B fire extinguisher. Following this unit, students applied their understanding of cellular respiration, photosynthesis and the carbon cycle to calculate the amount of carbon sequestered on a section of campus trees.

Takeaways: Participants will learn how to use phenomena and a 3D design approach to create project -based, integrated Curriculum that assesses SEPS equally with content. Participants will learn how to use student-centered pedagogical practices, hands-on exploration, and more authentic assessment practices. Participants will be familiar with how Integrating biology, chemistry and environmental standards in order to explore an authentic, real-world problem or challenge increases student engagement and performance.

Speakers

Elizabeth Helfant (Mary Institute and Saint Louis Country Day School: Saint Louis, MO)

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Chickenology: Food Delivery Challenge

McCormick Place - W179b

Participants will use sensemaking and the engineering design process to solve a real world food production problem in a small scale format. This lesson introduces the Food Delivery Challenge, in which participants must design a gravity feeder to carry food (chicken feed) to twelve hungry chickens for over 24 hours. To accomplish the task students must design and build a model of an efficient gravity feeder using the materials available to them. The scenario presented to the class: One of the feeders in your uncle’s barn has broken down, and a new one will not arrive until next month. You must create a gravity feeder to satisfy 12 chickens for 24 hours consistently to ensure the health of your flock. Participants will research, design, build and test their design before presenting to the group for feedback, Participants will then use the feedback to redesign for an improved feeder.

Takeaways: 1. Use the engineering design process to collaborate, design and build a gravitational feeder system that will feed 10 pounds of feed over a 24 hour period. 2. Present your design plan, and final product to the class for feedback. 3. Provide feedback to the design team for design improvement.

Speakers

Leah LaCrosse (McCormick Junior High School: Huron, OH), Heather Bryan (Education Projects, LLC: Columbus, OH)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Chickenology Food Delivery Challenge Lesson
Chickenology Student Rubric
Chickenology Food Delivery Challenge Slide Deck

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Environmental Justice Coalition: Including and Empowering Students in Civic Action

McCormick Place - W178a

This session will provide educators with a clear understanding of environmental justice and give them tools to integrate this topic into science classrooms and student-led initiatives. We will focus on the case study of the Sonoma County Environmental Justice Coalition. During the 2021-2022 school year, middle and high school teams from across Sonoma County were invited to sign up for a year-long learning and leadership development program hosted by the Sonoma County Office of Education. Student teams received training and mentorship around environmental justice throughout the year and created and implemented local action plans to address an environmental justice issue. Students had the opportunity to receive input and mentorship from professionals and share their actions and future plans with local leaders and industries at a culminating showcase. Participants will hear a brief overview of the structure of the coalition and will view testimonials from student members. Participants will receive tools to integrate environmental justice into their classrooms and resources to help student teams develop and implement environmental justice action plans. Finally, participants will work collaboratively to design next steps for scaling environmental justice in their classroom and beyond by using their local resources and networks.

Takeaways: Explore how to integrate environmental justice and civic engagement in science classrooms and programs.

Speakers

Ryan Kurada (Sonoma County Office of Education: Santa Rosa, CA), Anna Babarinde (Sonoma County Office of Education: Santa Rosa, CA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Environmental Justice Coalition Presentation

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Let's Get Middle School Students Interested in Climate Change!

McCormick Place - W175a

What causes seasons on Earth? How is permafrost affected by climate change? What can we learn from ice cores about climate? These questions are answered through a series of NGSS aligned, hands-on activities. Students design an experiment to test the effect of Earth’s tilt on seasons, explore the effect of climate change on structures built on permafrost, and more! The eesmarts climate change curriculum is composed of adapted lessons surrounding natural cycles that occur on Earth and in our solar system, including the carbon cycle and sunspot activity, how these cycles affect populations, and how humans may affect natural cycles. Activities examine evidence from the past through proxies such as tree rings, cherry tree blossoms, and ice core data. Additional topics include climate and ecosystems, the impact of invasive species, and how to minimize the effect of human activity. The lessons are part of the eesmarts K-12 curriculum, an energy efficiency and clean, renewable energy learning initiative funded by the Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund. They are written in the 5-E Instructional Model and include presentation Google Slides and handouts. Select digital resources will be provided to participants. The complete eesmarts program is free and available to all Connecticut educators.

Takeaways: Participants will explore activities involving natural cycles including the sun cycle, the carbon cycle, and seasons, as well as a variety of proxies and what they can tell us about Earth’s climate past and present.

Speakers

Kathleen Brooks (eesmarts: No City, No State), Karin Jakubowski (eesmarts: No City, No State)

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Data, Tables, Graphs, Oh My! Strategies to Get All Students Doing & Speaking Science

McCormick Place - W176c

We are naturally curious, prone to ask why? How? What? Unfortunately, somewhere along the way students lose the trust in their voices to ask questions of and from data. But data are what we use to do science and it permeates all aspects of society today. What should we do? Stop teaching the vocabulary of science and data first, and instead leverage classroom-ready strategies to empower students to lead with their innate curiosity to practice critical 21st century data literacy skills and master the science content. Join us to explore connections between our science content, inquiry-based activities, and data skills. We will experience research-based strategies and freely available resources for integrating phenomenon-based and local data into our science instruction to promote science literacy and student empowerment. We will participate in activities ourselves and reflect on approaches for how to bring these into our classrooms. Participants will leave more empowered to integrate data into their science content in purposeful ways to better help students do and communicate science. Working with and learning science from data fosters critical thinking skills, lifelong interests in science, and facilitates learners’ overall self-identity as a scientist. Let’s set all of our students up for success!

Takeaways: Participants will identify how data literacy is a critical aspect of science literacy in the 21st century, how students can do a lot more with data than we often think or presume from their science vocabulary alone, and how to leverage existing strategies to authentically integrate data into 6-12 science instruction to teach their science content and increase literacy simultaneously.

Speakers

Kristin Hunter-Thomson (Dataspire Education & Evaluation, Rutgers University: Princeton, NJ)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Access to Resource Document
Complete the Google Form to gain access to the Resource Document and slide deck from the workshop.

Thursday, July 21
3:40 PM - 4:10 PM
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Digital Choose-Your-Own Science Adventure

McCormick Place - W185a

Participants experience three different digital design challenges using branching scenarios that provide student choice and data sets involving wind energy, electromagnetism, and the greenhouse effect.

Takeaways: Participants will engage in three digital design challenges to test the efficiency of wind turbine blades, the strength of electromagnets, and the greenhouse effect on different land surfaces (polar region, water, and desert).

Speakers

Rebecca Tonkinson (eesmarts: Hartford, CT), Sharyon Holness (eesmarts: No City, No State), Kathleen Brooks (eesmarts: No City, No State)

Thursday, July 21
3:40 PM - 4:10 PM
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Teaching Critical-Thinking Skills to Reluctant Teenagers

McCormick Place - W181b

Learn how to overcome the apathy of teenagers, understand their motivations for not asking questions, and get them to be curious again!

Takeaways: Attendees will take away multiple strategies to implement in their classroom to spark the curiosity of teens they teach.

Speakers

Jamye Carr (Cedar Ridge High School: Hillsborough, NC)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Teaching Critical Thinking skills to reluctant teenagers.pptx

Thursday, July 21
4:25 PM - 4:55 PM
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Integrating CS into Science Storylines

McCormick Place - W176c

Science teachers at Lindblom Math and Science Academy in Chicago Public Schools have worked with Northwestern University’s CT-STEM department to develop computational thinking in science units aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards. The goal is for students to understand and apply computational thinking practices in their science classrooms to help make sense of phenomena or problems, analyze data, use models and develop explanations. Units, built by teachers, are designed to cover core science concepts in physics, chemistry, and biology. This program allows teachers to work with CT-STEM members to develop new simulations or other CT activities that work best in the unit. This was developed based on teacher need, when simulations didn’t exist to address the big ideas. Integration of NetLogo models, SageModeler, NetTango, and other data analysis activities are used to help students make real world connections. These tools allow students to learn and apply basic computer science ideas and skills as well as the 3-D of NGSS. Developed unit topics include: stoichiometry, climate change, gas laws, and energy. These units are available for public use and can be easily modified on the CT-STEM platform for teachers to use.

Takeaways: Overview of how teachers integrated Computational Thinking into science units and how to access units for Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Earth Science

Speakers

Carole Namowicz (Lindblom Math and Science Academy: Chicago, IL), Lauren Levites (Lindblom Math and Science Academy: Chicago, IL)

Thursday, July 21
5:10 PM - 5:40 PM
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Inspiration to Fruition

McCormick Place - W185a

Inspiration to Fruition provides any educator with a game plan on how to take an idea and available resources and create a project that enhances the student experience and skills.

Takeaways: 1. A template for designing a grassroots STEM or PBL project; 2. Top 10 tips on how to make managing the project actually manageable; and 3. Proof that trusting one's intuition to build a project based on an inspirational event can bring to fruition an amazing experience for students.

Speakers

Kelly Hartings (Indian Hill Middle School: Cincinnati, OH), Jessica Brown (Teacher: cincinnati, OH)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Inspiration to Fruition

Friday, July 22
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Integrating Computer Science into Science Courses Without Losing Your Mind

McCormick Place - W175a

Computer science CAN be integrated into high school science classes. Here are some ideas from the STEMcoding Project!

Takeaways: Attendees will work on three "STEMcoding" activities on: 1. climate change with connection to spreadsheets; 2. orbital motion for Earth science; and 3. the first of the "physics of video games" activities.

Speakers

Chris Orban (The Ohio State University at Marion: Marion, OH)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Orban_nsta22.pdf

Friday, July 22
11:50 AM - 12:50 PM
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Using Drones in the Classroom For Land and Crop Surveying Simulations

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 10

This session will lead participants through a discussion on why and how to use drone technology in the classroom. It will showcase a problem based learning activity in which drones are used in a surveying simulation.

Takeaways: How and why using drones can enhance the curriculum.

Speakers

Jane Hunt (Education Projects, LLC: Columbus, OH)

Friday, July 22
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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NSTA/ISTA Session- Bridging the Gap: Connecting STEM/Science Learning in CTE

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b

Student understanding of how science and STEM ideas and concepts are applied within their chosen career pathway is a critical component of many Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs, but for a variety of reasons these connections are often overlooked. Some states even provide CTE courses and Career Pathway standards that seem to go against the three-dimensional and student-centered learning grain. Yet, to truly meet the vision of the K-12 Framework, students in CTE and Vocational Education pathways should also be provided opportunities to engage in three-dimensional sensemaking in the context of their CTE course. In this session, we explore explicit connections between three-dimensional science learning and Agricultural, Food and Natural Resources as just one example of how three-dimensional student learning and sensemaking can be incorporated into CTE. We then explore how similar strategies can be utilized in other pathways with the goal of bridging the gap between science learning and practical application for students in CTE.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn strategies for integrating scientific sensemaking into CTE courses to support their students' mastery of the scientific concepts they will apply in those fields.

Speakers

Bridina Lemmer (Illinois Science Teaching Association: Jacksonville, IL), Chris Embry Mohr (Olympia High School: Stanford, IL)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Bridging the GAP

Saturday, July 23
9:20 AM - 10:20 AM
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Great Lakes Great Opportunities

McCormick Place - W187b

Use the Great Lakes as a learning tool! Participate in virtual classroom-ready activities, discover PD opportunities, and learn how to collect authentic water quality data.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn: 1. how to request and incorporate the use of the Hydrolab in their classroom to collect authentic water quality data either in the classroom or in the field; 2. how to utilize Nearpod to create engaging lessons that can be utilized virtually or in the classroom; and 3. about professional development opportunities aboard the R/V Lake Guardian and at Ohio State University's Stone Lab.

Speakers

Melissa Kowalski (Put-in-Bay Local School District: Put in Bay, OH), Shari Insley (North Olmsted Middle School: North Olmsted, OH)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

NSTA22 Great Lakes, Great Opportunities.pdf
PDF version of presentation slide deck

Saturday, July 23
9:20 AM - 10:20 AM
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Nourish the Future: Energy and Biofuels

McCormick Place - W196a

Students utilize different components (enzymes, yeast, feed stocks, and water) to produce ethanol and carbon dioxide through the process of fermentation. Students will develop a model of fermentation and explain how ethanol is made to answer the focus question "How can fermentation produce a renewable fuel source?" Students will develop experimental models to generate data in order to construct explanations about the relationships between the components of the fermentation process and to predict how those relationships can be manipulated to produce carbon dioxide. Students will design solutions to make the fermentation process as efficient as possible and generate the maximum amount of ethanol in a small bag environment Attendees will participate in hands-on activities centered around biofuel. Participants are going to prepare and compare different amounts of fermentation occurring in four different mixtures which will allow observations of production rates. A second activity focuses on a way to make a qualitative or quantitative explanation regarding the relationship between feed stock and glucose availability for ethanol production. Participants will deconstruct a model of starch to examine enzyme and starch reactions to determine how starches change into smaller molecules. Three additional hands-on activities that can be included in your classroom curriculum will be discussed.

Takeaways: Nourish the Future is a national education initiative developed by science teachers for science teachers to connect students to modern agriculture and provide sound science based resources that meet teacher and student needs in the classroom.

Speakers

Tiska Rodgers (Hayti High School: Hayti, MO), Leanne Thele (Perryville High School: No City, No State)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Nourish the Future Energy Biofuels slide deck
Nourish the Future Fermentation Factories Teacher Document
Nourish the Future Fermentation Factories Student Lesson

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Phenomenon-based Instruction - Unpacking the 3-D NGSS

McCormick Place - W180

Unpacking the 3-D NGSS while at the same time making science instruction engaging to students is a challenge faced by science teachers across the nation. With skillful use of phenomena-based instruction, science teachers engage students by converting what the teacher planned to teach into what the students want to learn. Culturally relevant, intellectually accessible and thought-provoking phenomena enable students to make engaging connections between the required curricula content and real-life scenarios and applications. Rather than recalling discrete facts, students apply new information and use transferable problem-solving skills to explain a natural or man-made phenomenon. Phenomenon-based science encourages students to ask questions, discover connections, and design models to make sense of what they observe. This session provides participating teachers opportunities to experience lessons in the same manner as students will. They examine a phenomenon and then ask questions, collaborate with partners and design models, and discuss digital tools that can be used to engage students in phenomenon-based learning. Teachers learn how to use questioning techniques and academic dialogue to spike discontent in the students' understanding of the phenomena, thereby, driving students to use science practices to further explore their curiosities

Takeaways: Help teachers to develop and deploy thought-provoking phenomena that will promote student engagement, comprehension, and achievement in the sciences by transforming what the teacher planned to teach into what the students are eager to learn.

Speakers

Chidi Duru (Prince George's County Public Schools: Upper Marlboro, MD)

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Energize Your Climate Change Course for High School

McCormick Place - W175c

How and why has Earth’s climate changed over time? How do we collect data about Earth’s natural history? How do Earth’s orbital variations affect climate? What role does phytoplankton play in the Carbon Cycle? These are all questions that are answered by exploring a series of hands-on activities that are NGSS aligned. Activities include: eccentricity, obliquity, precession, carbon and plants, the effect of carbon dioxide on temperature, ocean acidification, and more. The climate change curriculum, from the eesmarts K-12 curriculum, an energy efficiency and clean, renewable energy learning initiative funded by the Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund, is made up of adapted lessons surrounding natural cycles that occur on Earth and how humans may affect natural cycles. Activities examine evidence from the past through proxies such as forams and ice core data. Additional topics include sea-level rise and vulnerability, the impact of single use plastics, and how the effect of human activity can be minimized. The lessons are written in the 5-E Instructional Model (Engage - Explore - Explain - Elaborate - Evaluate) and include teacher-presentation Google Slides and student handouts. Select digital resources will be provided to participants. The complete eesmarts program is free and available to all Connecticut educators.

Takeaways: Participants will explore activities that demonstrate how and why Earth’s climate has changed over time.

Speakers

Karin Jakubowski (eesmarts: No City, No State), Kathleen Brooks (eesmarts: No City, No State)