2022 Chicago National Conference

July 21-23, 2022

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Pathway/Course

FILTERS APPLIED:6 - 8, Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL, STEM

 

Rooms and times subject to change.
10 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Using tools to sense and interact with the environment

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W193a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Using tools to sense and interact with the environment.pdf

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

After learning about computational thinking, participants will apply the framework to determine where students engage in computational thinking within the activity. Participants will engage in activities where students engineer as part of the investigations. Participants will be able to use a pre-programmed microcontroller (loaned by the presenters) to experience 3 different short investigations each tied to a different phenomenon. 1) Does angle matter? How does the angle of the collector affect how warm it is? Using the microcontroller and lamps participants will collect data to build a model that explains why the tilt of the Earth creates different seasons. 2) Transparent, Translucent, and Opaque. When working in a greenhouse, different materials can be used to cover the greenhouse. Which is the best material for your area? Using the light level sensor on the microcontroller, participants test different materials to recommend their uses when designing a greenhouse. 3) Making an alarm - using the microcontroller accelerometer sensor, participants arm an alarm and see how the accelerometer works in three dimensions. Participants will be provided printed copies of the lesson plans and how to engage students with using the microcontrollers. Note that no knowledge of coding or any equipment brought is necessary to participate in this workshop.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn (1) Microcontrollers are small computers that come with several integrated sensors. Their functionality makes them useful for both investigations and engineering projects. Some of the basic functionality of different microcontrollers (2) One definition of computation thinking is how to use computers to solve problems. Computational thinking activities that connect students to everyday phenomena. The development of algorithms or the decomposition of problems into simple steps are just two examples of processes associated with computation thinking. It is a powerful problem-solving technique that is used in the modern world (3) How engineering tasks provide opportunities for student sensemaking

SPEAKERS:
Susan German (Hallsville Middle School: Hallsville, MO), G. Michael Bowen (Mount Saint Vincent University: Halifax, NS)

Maximize the Benefits and Minimize the Challenges Associated with Embedding Engineering into the Science Curriculum using Argument-Driven Engineering

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W178b


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

This session is an introduction to a new approach to STEM instruction called Argument-Driven Engineering (ADE). ADE is an instructional approach that gives students an opportunity to learn to use core concepts and processes form science, engineering, and mathematics to figure out solutions to a meaningful and authentic problem that will help make the world a better place. This instructional approach also gives students an opportunity to develop disciplinary literacy skills (reading, writing, speaking, and listening) because they must obtain information, share and critique potential solutions through talk, and communicate what they figured out and how they know the solution is acceptable through writing. In this session, participants will examine the potential benefits and challenges associated with embedding engineering design into science classrooms and learn how the ADE instructional model can help maximize the benefits and reduce the challenges. Participants will also have a chance to experience an example of an ADE design challenge that invites them to design a shipping and storage container for insulin and see examples of how students who completed this design challenge used science, engineering, and mathematics content and processes to figure out how to keep the insulin cold for long periods of time. Participants will also learn about how this new approach was developed through three years of classroom-based research by a team of researchers at the University of Texas at Austin and how well ADE instructional materials are aligned with the TEKS for science, mathematics, CTE, and ELA.

TAKEAWAYS:
• How to give students an opportunity to learn how to use concepts and processes from science, engineering, and mathematics to design a solution to an authentic problem that will help make the world a better place.

SPEAKERS:
Todd Hutner (The University of Alabama: Austin, TX)

Let's Get Middle School Students Interested in Climate Change!

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W175a


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

What causes seasons on Earth? How is permafrost affected by climate change? What can we learn from ice cores about climate? These questions are answered through a series of NGSS aligned, hands-on activities. Students design an experiment to test the effect of Earth’s tilt on seasons, explore the effect of climate change on structures built on permafrost, and more! The eesmarts climate change curriculum is composed of adapted lessons surrounding natural cycles that occur on Earth and in our solar system, including the carbon cycle and sunspot activity, how these cycles affect populations, and how humans may affect natural cycles. Activities examine evidence from the past through proxies such as tree rings, cherry tree blossoms, and ice core data. Additional topics include climate and ecosystems, the impact of invasive species, and how to minimize the effect of human activity. The lessons are part of the eesmarts K-12 curriculum, an energy efficiency and clean, renewable energy learning initiative funded by the Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund. They are written in the 5-E Instructional Model and include presentation Google Slides and handouts. Select digital resources will be provided to participants. The complete eesmarts program is free and available to all Connecticut educators.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will explore activities involving natural cycles including the sun cycle, the carbon cycle, and seasons, as well as a variety of proxies and what they can tell us about Earth’s climate past and present.

SPEAKERS:
Kathleen Brooks (eesmarts), Karin Jakubowski (eesmarts: No City, No State)

Data, Tables, Graphs, Oh My! Strategies to Get All Students Doing & Speaking Science

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W176c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Access to Resource Document
Complete the Google Form to gain access to the Resource Document and slide deck from the workshop.

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

We are naturally curious, prone to ask why? How? What? Unfortunately, somewhere along the way students lose the trust in their voices to ask questions of and from data. But data are what we use to do science and it permeates all aspects of society today. What should we do? Stop teaching the vocabulary of science and data first, and instead leverage classroom-ready strategies to empower students to lead with their innate curiosity to practice critical 21st century data literacy skills and master the science content. Join us to explore connections between our science content, inquiry-based activities, and data skills. We will experience research-based strategies and freely available resources for integrating phenomenon-based and local data into our science instruction to promote science literacy and student empowerment. We will participate in activities ourselves and reflect on approaches for how to bring these into our classrooms. Participants will leave more empowered to integrate data into their science content in purposeful ways to better help students do and communicate science. Working with and learning science from data fosters critical thinking skills, lifelong interests in science, and facilitates learners’ overall self-identity as a scientist. Let’s set all of our students up for success!

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will identify how data literacy is a critical aspect of science literacy in the 21st century, how students can do a lot more with data than we often think or presume from their science vocabulary alone, and how to leverage existing strategies to authentically integrate data into 6-12 science instruction to teach their science content and increase literacy simultaneously.

SPEAKERS:
Kristin Hunter-Thomson (Dataspire Education & Evaluation, LLC: No City, No State)

Inspiration to Fruition

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W185a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Inspiration to Fruition

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Inspiration to Fruition provides any educator with a game plan on how to take an idea and available resources and create a project that enhances the student experience and skills.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. A template for designing a grassroots STEM or PBL project; 2. Top 10 tips on how to make managing the project actually manageable; and 3. Proof that trusting one's intuition to build a project based on an inspirational event can bring to fruition an amazing experience for students.

SPEAKERS:
Kelly Hartings (Indian Hill Middle School: CINCINNATI, OH), Jessica Brown (Teacher: cincinnati, OH)

Local Phenomenon-Based Projects

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W185d


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Learn how to better integrate local phenomena into classroom learning through the use of long-term projects and a competition.

TAKEAWAYS:
Strategies to use student-chosen local phenomena as the basis for long-term projects and participation in a national STEM competition.

SPEAKERS:
Winnie Boyle (Army Educational Outreach Program: , United States)

Using Drones in the Classroom For Land and Crop Surveying Simulations

Friday, July 22 • 11:50 AM - 12:50 PM

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 10


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

This session will lead participants through a discussion on why and how to use drone technology in the classroom. It will showcase a problem based learning activity in which drones are used in a surveying simulation.

TAKEAWAYS:
How and why using drones can enhance the curriculum.

SPEAKERS:
Jane Hunt (Nourish the Future - Education Projects, LLC: Columbus, OH)

Artemis Mission Activities: Landing Humans on the Moon

Saturday, July 23 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

McCormick Place - W184d


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Learn about NASA’s Next Gen STEM educator resources and how to join our first online community of practice for STEM educators (CONNECTS).

TAKEAWAYS:
Educators will learn about future opportunities with NASA for student participation while completing a lunar lander design challenge.

SPEAKERS:
Lynn Dotson (NASA Office of STEM Engagement-GoH: Kennedy Space Center, FL)

Engaging All Students Using Culturally Relevant Inquiry Based Teaching Practices

Saturday, July 23 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - W181a


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Present culturally relevant inquiry-based teaching practices to engage all students in science learning. The interactive session will define what it means to be a culturally relevant practitioner, and how to use inquiry-based teaching practices in their science classroom. The participants will be engaged using scenarios and identification lessons that are culturally relevant inquiry-based.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will be able to define inquiry-based learning as culturally responsive/relevant teaching and identify characteristics of cultural competency in science teachers.

SPEAKERS:
Rochelle Darville (West St. John High School: Edgard, LA)

Programming Simple Tools to Facilitate Science Inquiry Investigations

Saturday, July 23 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W184d



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Programming Simple Tools to Facilitate Science Inquiry Investigations.pdf

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Participants will learn about the framework for computational thinking and then learn to apply it to science inquiry investigations using Block Coding (used with students in elementary and middle school in many jurisdictions) and how it can be used to improve the conduct of science investigations (and be more like the investigations conducted by scientists).   Participants will apply the computational thinking framework to creating/modifying/using simple programs (either using a free online programming tool OR with a simple, inexpensive microcontroller that will be loaned by the presenters) that can be used in science inquiry investigations either for conducting the investigation (e.g., a random number generator) or for collecting data (e.g., a counter and a timer). Investigations where these can be used will be discussed and demonstrated. The use of the microcontrollers and/or a free online programming tool to develop a simple measurement tool provides participants (and their students) an opportunity to experience a simulated situation a scientist or engineer would face as they use computing tools to develop automated measuring responses.   Finally, as an example of what is known as “physical computing”, participants will learn to build (and will build if time allows) a physical interface (to use with a computer or Chromebook) that allows them to interact with a program they have either written or downloaded.   Participants will be provided printed copies of example lesson plans and instruction sheets on how to engage students with using the Scratch program and the microcontrollers). Note that no knowledge of coding or any equipment is necessary to participate in this workshop. 

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how computational thinking (applied to simple block coding examples and simple micro-controllers) can be used in science classrooms to help students conduct better inquiry investigations and better experience “authentic” science practices.

SPEAKERS:
G. Michael Bowen (Mount Saint Vincent University: Halifax, NS), Susan German (Hallsville Middle School: Hallsville, MO)

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