2022 Chicago National Conference

July 21-23, 2022

More sessions and events will be added to the browser throughout January.
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FILTERS APPLIED:Hands-On Workshop, Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL, Technology

 

6 results

Using tools to sense and interact with the environment

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W193a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Using tools to sense and interact with the environment.pdf

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

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After learning about computational thinking, participants will apply the framework to determine where students engage in computational thinking within the activity. Participants will engage in activities where students engineer as part of the investigations. Participants will be able to use a pre-programmed microcontroller (loaned by the presenters) to experience 3 different short investigations each tied to a different phenomenon. 1) Does angle matter? How does the angle of the collector affect how warm it is? Using the microcontroller and lamps participants will collect data to build a model that explains why the tilt of the Earth creates different seasons. 2) Transparent, Translucent, and Opaque. When working in a greenhouse, different materials can be used to cover the greenhouse. Which is the best material for your area? Using the light level sensor on the microcontroller, participants test different materials to recommend their uses when designing a greenhouse. 3) Making an alarm - using the microcontroller accelerometer sensor, participants arm an alarm and see how the accelerometer works in three dimensions. Participants will be provided printed copies of the lesson plans and how to engage students with using the microcontrollers. Note that no knowledge of coding or any equipment brought is necessary to participate in this workshop.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn (1) Microcontrollers are small computers that come with several integrated sensors. Their functionality makes them useful for both investigations and engineering projects. Some of the basic functionality of different microcontrollers (2) One definition of computation thinking is how to use computers to solve problems. Computational thinking activities that connect students to everyday phenomena. The development of algorithms or the decomposition of problems into simple steps are just two examples of processes associated with computation thinking. It is a powerful problem-solving technique that is used in the modern world (3) How engineering tasks provide opportunities for student sensemaking

SPEAKERS:
Susan German (Hallsville Middle School: Hallsville, MO), G. Michael Bowen (Mount Saint Vincent University: Halifax, NS)

STEM for All! Benefits of STEM Integration for Struggling to Gifted Learners, and Everyone in Between

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W187b



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
NSTA_STEMforALL.pdf

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

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To effectively engage audience members, I will balance their readiness to learn, cognitive load, and stimulating activities. Using real-world examples, I will demonstrate the power of STEM in elementary classrooms to grow all learners and provide necessary 21st-century skills. Often STEM is an enrichment offered to high-achiever but struggling learners have even more to gain from STEM including confidence and leadership. I will focus on practical application, but valuable references and data will be included to support my practices. I will begin the session with a survey to identify the needs and perceptions of participants regarding STEM integration. Based on input, I will share research-based strategies, classroom integration examples, or dispel misconceptions. I will include an interactive STEM activity using index cards and paper clips to provide a STEM lesson model and demonstrate the ease of integrating STEM with simple, classroom supplies. Participants will leave the session with a better understanding of the benefits of STEM in K-5 classrooms and feel more comfortable integrating STEM into their own classrooms.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will understand the value of STEM integration beyond the four letters of the acronym, including the benefits of productive struggle of high achievers and how the grit of struggling learners are paramount in the success of STEM challenges.

SPEAKERS:
Erika Neuman (Bulverde Creek Elementary School: San Antonio, TX)

Nourish the Future: Energy and Biofuels

Saturday, July 23 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

McCormick Place - W196a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Nourish the Future Energy Biofuels slide deck
Nourish the Future Fermentation Factories Student Lesson
Nourish the Future Fermentation Factories Teacher Document

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Students utilize different components (enzymes, yeast, feed stocks, and water) to produce ethanol and carbon dioxide through the process of fermentation. Students will develop a model of fermentation and explain how ethanol is made to answer the focus question "How can fermentation produce a renewable fuel source?" Students will develop experimental models to generate data in order to construct explanations about the relationships between the components of the fermentation process and to predict how those relationships can be manipulated to produce carbon dioxide. Students will design solutions to make the fermentation process as efficient as possible and generate the maximum amount of ethanol in a small bag environment Attendees will participate in hands-on activities centered around biofuel. Participants are going to prepare and compare different amounts of fermentation occurring in four different mixtures which will allow observations of production rates. A second activity focuses on a way to make a qualitative or quantitative explanation regarding the relationship between feed stock and glucose availability for ethanol production. Participants will deconstruct a model of starch to examine enzyme and starch reactions to determine how starches change into smaller molecules. Three additional hands-on activities that can be included in your classroom curriculum will be discussed.

TAKEAWAYS:
Nourish the Future is a national education initiative developed by science teachers for science teachers to connect students to modern agriculture and provide sound science based resources that meet teacher and student needs in the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Tiska Rodgers (Hayti High School: Hayti, MO), Leanne Thele (Perryville High School: No City, No State)

Programming Simple Tools to Facilitate Science Inquiry Investigations

Saturday, July 23 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W184d



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Programming Simple Tools to Facilitate Science Inquiry Investigations.pdf

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Participants will learn about the framework for computational thinking and then learn to apply it to science inquiry investigations using Block Coding (used with students in elementary and middle school in many jurisdictions) and how it can be used to improve the conduct of science investigations (and be more like the investigations conducted by scientists).   Participants will apply the computational thinking framework to creating/modifying/using simple programs (either using a free online programming tool OR with a simple, inexpensive microcontroller that will be loaned by the presenters) that can be used in science inquiry investigations either for conducting the investigation (e.g., a random number generator) or for collecting data (e.g., a counter and a timer). Investigations where these can be used will be discussed and demonstrated. The use of the microcontrollers and/or a free online programming tool to develop a simple measurement tool provides participants (and their students) an opportunity to experience a simulated situation a scientist or engineer would face as they use computing tools to develop automated measuring responses.   Finally, as an example of what is known as “physical computing”, participants will learn to build (and will build if time allows) a physical interface (to use with a computer or Chromebook) that allows them to interact with a program they have either written or downloaded.   Participants will be provided printed copies of example lesson plans and instruction sheets on how to engage students with using the Scratch program and the microcontrollers). Note that no knowledge of coding or any equipment is necessary to participate in this workshop. 

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how computational thinking (applied to simple block coding examples and simple micro-controllers) can be used in science classrooms to help students conduct better inquiry investigations and better experience “authentic” science practices.

SPEAKERS:
G. Michael Bowen (Mount Saint Vincent University: Halifax, NS), Susan German (Hallsville Middle School: Hallsville, MO)

Butterfly Gardening Using Native Plants

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W185d


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

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Butterfly Gardening Using Native Plants workshop is a very exciting educational experience! This session will guide participants through exposure to native North American plants that are host plants for butterfly caterpillars as well as nectar plants to attract adults. We will participate in an assortment of hands-on activities which include creating a "Life Cycle Plate" and singing the "Metamorphosis Song". A main focus of this session is to provide participants with strategies to enable them to create and sustain their own schoolyard habitat. A roadmap to success will be shared, along with a question and answer session for potential challenges! . Beyond the workshop, continued implementation support will be shared with a comprehensive digital data collection and email contact information provided to participants. They will also receive contact information for the North American Butterfly Association, and The Native Plant Society for their local area. Resources will be shared focusing on the importance of organic gardening in relationship to a successful butterfly garden. Finally, an assortment of grant opportunities will be shared in order to assist teachers in getting funding for their projects. Upon completion of this time together, butterfly enthusiasts will be dispatched throughout the country. Once implemented, students and parents will be captivated by the beauty of the garden, and will sustain life lessons on the vital connection we share with our environment.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participates will leave with the knowledge to go back to their schools/classroom equipped with the knowledge to set up an area to attract an assortment of native butterflies.

SPEAKERS:
Nancy Sale (Lillie C. Evans K-8 Center: Miami, FL)

Facilitating Inquiry for Growth in Science and Engineering Practices: Exploring Surface Heating

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W178a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Exploring Surface Heating.pdf
UHI Observations.pdf

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Learning through place-based, student-centered, teacher-facilitated STEM inquiry increases student engagement in and ownership of learning and promotes student growth in science and engineering practices, disciplinary core ideas, and crosscutting concepts. Using a unit plan I developed for exploring local microclimates, participants will engage in activities and discussion of techniques for cultivating students as collaborators in the learning process. The unit is designed to encourage growth in asking questions, designing and conducting investigations, collecting data, making sense of data, communicating findings, and identifying local problems and designing solutions to a student-identified problem. Participants will use NASA infrared images of surface temperatures captured during an ISS mission to observe the urban heat island phenomenon. They will explore Google Earth to spark questions about surface heating that can be answered through investigation of the local neighborhood or school campus. Given a list of equipment that students used during the unit, participants will collaboratively design an investigation to collect place-based data. Discussion includes extension activities that facilitate student understanding of surface heating and cooling. Discussion also includes how revision and reflection can be used to monitor individual student growth and promote ownership of learning by students. Emphasis is on facilitation techniques.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learning through place-based, student-centered, teacher-facilitated STEM inquiry increases student engagement in and ownership of learning and promotes student growth in science and engineering practices, disciplinary core ideas, and crosscutting concepts.

SPEAKERS:
Loris Chen (Science Education Consultant: Fair Lawn, NJ)