2022 Chicago National Conference

July 21-23, 2022

All sessions added to My Agenda prior to this notice have been exported to the mobile app and will be visible in your account when the app launches. Any sessions added now, will also have to be added in the app.
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Pathway/Course

FILTERS APPLIED:9 - 12, Presentation, Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL, Technology

 

Rooms and times subject to change.
11 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Engaging with Data using CODAP in InquiryHub 3D Storylined Biology

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W196a


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

Analyzing and interpreting data and using mathematical and computational reasoning are complex at the high school level, which requires students to employ correlational and causational thinking while manipulating visualizations using tools. CODAP, a product of the Concord Consortium, is designed to give students access to these powerful practices with minimal software requirements and with a mission to make data literacy accessible for all students. InquiryHub uses CODAP to provide students with agency because they can determine the variables of interest, in which to create graphical representations from the same data set. In our free, open-source program, students can work with authentic datasets from the CODAP website, data they gather, or data from professional studies. Inside our storyline instructional sequences, inquiryHub leverages CODAP as students analyze the rainfall on the Serengeti and how it correlates to wildebeest populations. In the session, participants will try out CODAP by adding multiple variables of data to answer the question, “What’s happening to large animals on the Serengeti plain?” and how to apply CODAP in their classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
CODAP can be used in many different three-dimensional ways to have students analyze and interpret data to make sense of phenomena while providing student agency.

SPEAKERS:
Kerri Wingert (Good Question Research: Boulder, CO)

Did I really just flip this classroom?

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W185a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Presentation note taking worksheet

STRAND: Adapting Virtual Learning to Increase Access and Participation in a Face-to-Face Classroom

Show Details

The purpose of the presentation is to model how to flip a classroom from the traditional methods to more innovative methods to engage students. The participants will be able to create a deck by the end of the session. Participants will be given the background and research based strategies that Pear Deck uses to ensure that equity and inclusion are met while ensuring the seamless integration of the platform. Participants will be given the pedagogy of why this tool is needed in their classroom. Participants will be introduced to EdPuzzle and Screencastify to highlight how these tools can be used as well to flip their classrooms. A Pear Deck interactive slide will be presented to the audience. The audience will log in with the given code. As I present the audience will have my screen on their device. The audience will participate in a series of interactive activities designed to immerse them platform and give them the experience that students will have. The presentation is highly interactive with the first half of the presentation be using to interact with the platforms and the second half given for participants to explore and ask questions. The audience will be engaged with device-based activities from the beginning to the end of the presentation. The presentation style will be catch and release. I will capture their attention for some time and then I will release them to navigate through the platforms while I offer support. Attendees will learn how to create a Pear Deck, a screencastify recording and how to navigate through EdPuzzle to either create or utilize existing videos. Attendees will learn how to take the materials they are already using to flip them into a more blended learning model. The attendees will walk away with a Deck that can be used immediately in their classroom and my information to reach out to me if they have any questions during implementation.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will walk away with the basic knowledge of how to flip their classroom and be able to implement the strategies immediately into their classroom so that they are able to increase equity and inclusion.

SPEAKERS:
Cecelia Gillam (Hahnville High School: La Place, LA)

Using GeoSpatial Data to Teach Climate Justice

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W176a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Link to Schools for Climate Action Campaign
Free resources for student advocacy for climate justice on local, state and federal level.
Presentation
Resources, curriculum, lesson plans, sample case studies of student advocacy

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

Let's discuss the expansion and availability of geospatial data (arcGIS, EJScreen, CalAdapt) to examine environmental justice issues in their own community and create climate resilience action plans for an authentic audience (city council, school district, state lawmakers).

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will explore strategies for using geospatial data to examine, interpret, and act on place-based environmental justice issues in their communities.

SPEAKERS:
Nancy Metzger-Carter (Sonoma Academy: Santa Rosa, CA)

Incorporating the 3 Rs of Animal Use in High School Science Classes

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W175a


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

A cross-disciplinary team of teachers, subject matter experts, and curriculum developers have designed resources and materials to facilitate teaching students about the use of animals in scientific research in the United States, as well as Russell and Burch’s 3 Rs principles of replacement, reduction, and refinement of animal use. The materials, which are aligned with Next Generation Science Standards, are geared toward high school science students. The modules can be taught separately or in combination, giving educators flexibility to choose specific content areas to share and explore with their students. During the session, we will present two learning plans: one that introduces students to the 3 Rs principles and how animals are used in scientific research, and another that covers the 3 Rs principles in more depth. We will share information, including teaching plans, learning materials, and performance assessment tasks associated with the curriculum, with session attendees.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will have an opportunity to learn more about the content and activities covered in two lesson plans focused on the use of animals in scientific research in the United States and the 3 Rs principles. Sample lesson plans and associated learning materials, including presentations, articles, and worksheets, will be shared with attendees.

SPEAKERS:
Pam Osenkowski (National Anti-Vivisection Society - BioLEAP: Chicago, IL)

Planning More Accessible Science Lessons with Universal Design for Learning (UDL)

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W184d



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Claims and evidence.jpg
Debate.jpg
Final Planning Science Lessons For ALL- NSTA Chicago.pptx
Planning Science Lessons For ALL- NSTA Chicago.pdf
Speaking like a scientist.pdf - Inv. Part 1.pdf

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

In this presentation we will start with an existing basic physical science lesson that uses disciplinary core ideas on electricity, the engineering practice of making a model by constructing a basic electrical circuit, and the cross-cutting concept of cause and effect (closing the circuit starts current flow and turns on the light). We will then modify it using Universal Design for Learning (UDL) so it is more accessible, especially for students with disabilities. UDL encourages multiple means of representation, expression, and engagement for presenting and receiving content and information related to the lesson and gives students several ways to acquire the lesson knowledge, Multiple means of expression allows the students several choices in how they can “show what they know” and multiple means of engagement offers learners offers appropriate challenges to get students interested and motivated. Planning or modifying lessons using UDL not only makes lessons more accessible, but it also makes lessons more engaging for all students in inclusive classrooms.

TAKEAWAYS:
1) Universal Design for Learning (UDL) encourages multiple means of representation, expression, and engagement for presenting and receiving content and information related to the lesson. Use of UDL makes lessons more engaging for all students. 2) Applying UDL (Universal Design for Learning) will make the lesson more accessible, especially for students with special needs. 3) You may start with a lesson you already have. It is not necessary to develop a lesson from scratch when using UDL.

SPEAKERS:
Mary O'Donnell (Penn State University), Gargi Adhikari (Holland Brook School/Readington Township Schools: Whitehouse Station, NJ)

STEM + Empathy in Use in the Design of an Improved Bionic Arm

Friday, July 22 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W185d



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Slides
Session slides with links to all resources and contact information

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Empathic engineering design can help develop students’ cultural competence as well as inform the design of more useful innovations for people with limb differences.

TAKEAWAYS:
School-based activities that are oriented toward improving community members’ lives can simultaneously support the development of students’ cultural competence and integrated STEM literacy.

SPEAKERS:
Susan Meabh Kelly (University of Connecticut: Storrs Mansfield, CT), Brittany Klimowicz (NYC iSchool: New York, NY)

Getting Carried Away: The UpLab

Friday, July 22 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W176a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Presentation

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

Using the Dual Range Force Sensor, participants will determine how many helium balloons are needed to lift themselves and the house from Disney’s film Up.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Using the phenomenon of the helium balloon lifted house from the movie "Up," attendees will leave with a lab using the Dual Range Force Sensor to determine the amount of balloons needed to lift themselves and the house; and 2. the session will show how this can be used for any level of student, and as a bonus will also incorporate how the data collection and analysis can be collected using Python coding.

SPEAKERS:
Todd Graba (Crystal Lake South High School: Crystal Lake, IL), Brad Posnanski (Comsewogue High School: Port Jefferson Station, NY)

Engaging with Your STEM Ecosystem Through After-School Programs: Lessons from Science Olympiad

Friday, July 22 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W179b


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

A challenge that STEM education presents to educators is how to stay current in an ever-evolving field to accurately represent and engage their students with new topics, activities, and careers. Too often STEM teachers become locked-in on a set of topics, activities, and careers because of the resources and opportunities to which they have access. After-school programs, and their ability to foster partnerships within a school’s larger STEM ecosystem, are one mechanism to open up STEM programs within schools to new topics, activities, and careers while offering avenues for professional growth and learning for the classroom teacher. By introducing the Science Olympiad program and the strategies used by our school participants for over three decades to build partnerships, connect to their STEM ecosystem, and expand learning we intend to help attendees draw parallels to their STEM ecosystems and their after-school programs. Building off of this information, attendees will analyze and discuss ways their STEM ecosystem can contribute to their STEM program, develop approaches for asking ecosystem members for support, and recognize opportunities to grow their STEM program through after-school programs. The session will close with a discussion of attendees’ specific challenges and issues ensuring attendees leave with actionable solutions.

TAKEAWAYS:
The big takeaway from this session will attendees examining their STEM ecosystem to identify potential partners who align with their programming and can support student learning.

SPEAKERS:
John Loehr (Science Olympiad: Oakbrook Terrace, IL)

Toshiba America Foundation wants to work together with teachers who are looking for a better way of doing the right thing

Friday, July 22 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W175c


STRAND: Learn and Lead: Developing a Community for Expanded Participation in Science and STEM

Show Details

Toshiba America Foundation wants to work together with teachers who are looking for a better way to engage the community in STEM. Participants will hear from educators that have won money for their school and communities to implement STEM action projects.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how they can receive cash awards and acknowledge for STEM action projects.

SPEAKERS:
John Anderson (Toshiba America Foundation: Irvine, CA)

The Science of Student Engagement- How stress and the brain affect learning

Saturday, July 23 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

McCormick Place - W181c


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

Students find science difficult or non-stimulating particularly when teachers do not consider cognitive, physiological, and socio-emotional disparities in students. Research has shown that engaging the appropriate parts of the brain helps students make a long-lasting, personalized connection to scientific concepts and practices. Studies show that discipline and learning problems in our classrooms may be associated with a lack of student engagement. Engaged students are less likely to be disruptive and are more likely to retain information longer. The focus of this presentation is to equip teachers with the pedagogical skills and strategies needed to drive student engagement and achievement by recognizing and addressing physiological, cognitive, and socio-emotional disparities in students based on an understanding of how a learner’s brain works. Participating teachers will explore the impact of emotions, storytelling, culturally relevant and hands-on learning on the forebrain and consequently on student engagement and comprehension. Teachers will learn to correctly harness the learning power of the forebrain, particularly, those of the hippocampus and amygdala, by appropriately employing suitable learning strategies. These will enhance student engagement, improve learning outcomes and increase academic achievement in the sciences.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will learn to correctly harness the learning power of the forebrain, particularly, those of the hippocampus and amygdala, by appropriately employing suitable learning strategies

SPEAKERS:
Chidi Duru (Prince George's County Public Schools: Upper Marlboro, MD)

Your Students Can Be the First to Annotate (Discover the Function of) a Gene in a Microorganism

Saturday, July 23 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

McCormick Place - W195



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Final NSTA Gene Annotation for Conference.pptx

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

This hands-on project guides students through discovering the function of a microorganism gene (whose function has not yet been determined), assigned uniquely to that student.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Science is very exciting. Each student in the Geni-Act project will be the first person to discover the function of a gene in a microorganism. Results are entered into a national genome database; 2. The gene annotation process will be provided. Special tools or special knowledge are not required. There is no cost; and 3. Guidance for doing the annotation process with an inclusion class (a general education class with several special education students) will be provided.

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