2023 Atlanta National Conference

March 22-25, 2023

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FILTERS APPLIED:9 - 12, Poster, Teaching Strategies and Classroom Practice

 

Rooms and times subject to change.
19 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Using Rubrics to Grade Lab Reports and Projects

Friday, March 24 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Georgia World Congress Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


STRAND: Teaching Strategies and Classroom Practice

Show Details

Rubrics are great assessment tools when grading lab reports and projects. Rubrics help to clarify expectations, inspire students to set goals and give educators a way to improve feedback that stimulates student reflection. Emphasis is on application and analysis not getting the right answers.

TAKEAWAYS:
The Poster will highlight best practices for creating and using rubrics to grade lab reports and projects. The poster will include best practices, main components of a rubric, tips for creating rubrics and well as best practices for feedback and grading using rubrics.

SPEAKERS:
Kimberly Morton (Instructional Coach)

Phenomenal Teaching - Increase Engagement and Inquiry

Friday, March 24 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Georgia World Congress Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


STRAND: Teaching Strategies and Classroom Practice

Show Details

Learn how to use guiding phenomena to increase student engagement and inquiry. The guiding phenomenon of Sickle Cell will be demonstrated for Biology and Mangrove Forests for Environmental Science.

TAKEAWAYS:
From this session, attendees will learn how to use guiding phenomena to develop units that engage students and increase inquiry.

SPEAKERS:
Elissa Blount (Vidalia High School: Vidalia, GA)

"When the Blood Drops Everything Stops" - Incorporating Measurement Error as an Opportunity for Success in an Experiment-Based Lesson

Friday, March 24 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Georgia World Congress Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


STRAND: Teaching Strategies and Classroom Practice

Show Details

Students may lose confidence in science skills when inconsistencies are not addressed. Our project shows that students can feel success by understanding measurement error, identifying ways to reduce measurement error, and analyzing the impact of those modifications.

TAKEAWAYS:
This project will demonstrate educationally and statistically significant impact of a piloted, experiment-based measurement error lesson. Attendees will take home tips for addressing inconsistent data to foster student success.

SPEAKERS:
Alexandria Martin (Student: , SC), Tiannah Green (Student: Warrenville, SC), Hannah Smith (Student: Warrenville, SC), Darneisha Hughes (Student: Warrenville, SC), Destiny Ramos (Student: Warrenville, SC), Janiya Dunbar (Student: Warrenville, SC), Alexis Wren (Student: Warrenville, SC), Samantha Brosnahan (Aiken County Career Cente: Langley, SC), Vivian Swearingen (Student: Warrenville, SC), Sophia Taylor-Davis (Student: Warrenville, SC), Aubria Johnson (Student: Warrenville, SC), Jose Rodriguez (Student: Warrenville, SC), Atticus Lull (Student: Warrenville, SC), Savannah Manning (Student: Warrenville, SC), Chassity Williams (Student: Warrenville, SC), Kayleigh Thigpen (Student: Warrenville, SC), Katherine Roberts (Student: Warrenville, SC), Christie Palladino (Teacher: Warrenville, SC)

Handling extinction and adaptation: Project Based Learning with low-cost fossils

Friday, March 24 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Georgia World Congress Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
PosterCan Biology Teachers Use Low-Cost Fossils for Evolution Adaptation PBL
From the abstract:In High School Biology, providing hands-on connections to Earth’s biodiversity can be challenging. But project-based learning (PBL) using fossil-bearing rocks of multiple ages gives students a concrete experience. They can touch and inspect adaptation and evolution over the mind-boggling time spans of Earth’s existence. The expense and relative rarity of anatomically complete fossils is an obstacle even to universities, when their goal is to systematically teach fossil identif

STRAND: Teaching Strategies and Classroom Practice

Show Details

This project was funded by a National Science Foundation grant to expose high school students to geoscience within their required science curriculum. A collateral benefit is integrating key concepts in other sciences. In Biology, natural selection requires eons (“deep time”) to create Earth’s biodiversity. In project-based learning using fossil-bearing rocks of multiple ages, students experience deep time concretely. A barrier to hands-on fossil study is the expense of specimens good enough for university students to systematically learn fossil taxa. However, imperfect samples can connect anyone to deep time. Ironically, some such samples are simply dumped when teachers return from professional development field trips. This presentation reveals a path to making use of such ordinary material by 1) circling fossils in ink, 2) creating a picture guide from circled fossils, 3) building a PBL unit uniting those fossils with a biodiversity-though-time graphic known as a Tree of Life diagram.

TAKEAWAYS:
Might students better master evolution standards, especially extinction and adaptation, by encountering fossils through "deep time"? Teacher-collected samples, with fossils circled in ink, a picture guide made from the set, and a detailed Tree of Life diagram form foundations for PBL exploration.

SPEAKERS:
Adrianna Rajkumar (Lecturer), Katty Mobasher (Professor of Geology and GIS: , GA), Bill Witherspoon (geologist/educator: Decatur, GA)

CurrentGeneration.org using STEM to make a difference in the world

Friday, March 24 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Georgia World Congress Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


STRAND: Teaching Strategies and Classroom Practice

Show Details

Students will present this poster that describes how they design, 3D print and solder lights for their global peers who are living in light poverty. The Design Thinking Process begins with empathize, so students interact with peers living in light poverty to understand their realities. This connection changes the learning from something that the teacher is doing to them to something they are doing for their new friend. The remainder of the Design Thinking Process encourages communication, critical thinking and creativity along with STEM skills to produce a new custom-made light. At the end, not only do more students have clean lights to continue their studies, but the presenting students believe that they can make a difference in the world and are empowered to act when they see problems rather than wait for someone else. Large percentages of females who participate in CurrentGeneration.org alter their trajectories and attend engineering programs at post-secondary.

TAKEAWAYS:
Solving real problems for real people brings motivation and excellence to learning across many disciplines. Students are able to uncover new skills and passions while developing their STEM skills and sense of global citizenship. They are empowered to act to solve problems rather than wait.

SPEAKERS:
Chris Ryan (PhD student/Research Associate: , NB), Ian Fogarty (Riverview High School: Riverview, NB)

How to STEMify your science labs

Friday, March 24 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Georgia World Congress Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


STRAND: Teaching Strategies and Classroom Practice

Show Details

Exposure to STEM in a traditional science classroom is a gateway for students to start thinking about pursuing STEM fields. The session will discuss how to take a traditional inquiry lab done in the science classroom and up the rigor and interaction by STEMifying them. Science labs already have the

TAKEAWAYS:
Different strategies to incorporate technology, engineering and math into a science lesson to stemify the lesson.

SPEAKERS:
Selene Verhofstad (Dobie High School: Houston, TX), Faryal Shaukat (Dobie High School: Houston, TX)

NSTA District Professional Learning: Find out what NSTA can do for you to support science teaching and learning!

Friday, March 24 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Georgia World Congress Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
District PL opportunities

STRAND: Teaching Strategies and Classroom Practice

Show Details

NSTA provides a wide array of professional learning services for teachers, science specialists, and administrators.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn how to bring NSTA professional learning services to your school, district, or organization (face-to-face, virtual, and hybrid).

SPEAKERS:
Michelle Phillips (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

STEM Day the Easy Way - STEM Day Ideas for Grades K-8

Friday, March 24 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Georgia World Congress Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


STRAND: Teaching Strategies and Classroom Practice

Show Details

This session will provide educators with ideas for hosting STEM day/night for K-8 students (especially in Title I schools). Attendees will participate in hands-on STEM challenges that explore phenomena, require minimal preparation, and can be completed in 45 minutes or less. Educators will walk away with packets that include posters, supply lists, rubrics, and worksheets. This session will help attendees to facilitate and model simple Engineering Design Challenges that will engage ALL scholars.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how to coordinate a STEM day/night including scheduling ideas, resources. Attendees will receive packets for their respective grade levels/grade bands that include posters, supply lists, rubrics, and worksheets.

SPEAKERS:
Karelle Williams (The Main Street Academy: Atlanta, GA)

Human Evolution Lab Suite

Saturday, March 25 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Georgia World Congress Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Human Evolution Lab Suite (HELS)

STRAND: Teaching Strategies and Classroom Practice

Show Details

The Human Evolution Lab Suite (HELS) is a collection of select labs that supplement existing biology curricula. The very best fossil, physiologic, behavioral, and genetic evidence is woven together to produce a compelling confluence of evidence for hominid (human) evolution.

TAKEAWAYS:
The Human Evolution Lab Suite (HELS) is a set of labs that features the most compelling and student-accessible evidence for human evolution, designed for user-friendly delivery by an instructor with the help of open access lesson plans and tools.

SPEAKERS:
Chris Bayer (Co-Founder, AncientAncestors.org: Feucht, Germany)

Sensemaking in the High School Classroom

Saturday, March 25 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Georgia World Congress Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


STRAND: Teaching Strategies and Classroom Practice

Show Details

Our High School Committee Poster will highlight the ways HS educators are creating a classroom culture grounded in Sensemaking for grades 9-12.

TAKEAWAYS:
What you can do tomorrow to flip your classroom so the HS student is the knower.

SPEAKERS:
Jodi Bahr (Harvard Public Schools: Harvard, NE)

Teaching Science Through Cooking For Secondary Educators

Saturday, March 25 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Georgia World Congress Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


STRAND: Teaching Strategies and Classroom Practice

Show Details

Empower students to playfully explore science through food and cooking. Explore the theoretical underpinnings that support sensemaking in the classroom and practical avenues for facilitating equitable and accessible learning through food and cooking.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how to authentically leverage food and cooking to make science concepts concrete in the secondary classroom which platforms individual student voices, experiences, and ideas.

SPEAKERS:
Kate Strangfeld (Harvard University: Cambridge, MA)

Light Embodied Odyssey: Students Journey through STEM on the way to Art

Saturday, March 25 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Georgia World Congress Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


STRAND: Teaching Strategies and Classroom Practice

Show Details

Students will present their work to make an interactive LED sculpture that displays different emotions when it senses the presence of humans. They soldered customized circuit boards and LEDs, made a 2D plot of different emotions of brightness and blink rate to inform their light patterns, coded proximity sensors, used refraction and reflection of light and borrowed ideas from biology and psychology to bring students together after pandemic isolation. The six columns of laser cut acrylic hang from the ceiling outside the theatre and form the constellation LEO which matches our lion mascot. While they practiced diverse STEM skills, the odyssey into the ambiguity made room for creativity which was uncomfortable for the students at first because no longer was there only one right answer to find. The resulting critical thinking and creativity are vital to solve the challenges and leverage the opportunities of the 4th Industrial Revolution.

TAKEAWAYS:
Creating a public display that requires STEM skills allows students to diversify their learning and increases the motivation for quality. Doing tech art helps develop comfort with exploring ambiguity along with the critical thinking associated with no one right answer.

SPEAKERS:
Ian Fogarty (Riverview High School: Riverview, NB)

Using Pavement Design to teach Math and Science

Saturday, March 25 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Georgia World Congress Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


STRAND: Teaching Strategies and Classroom Practice

Show Details

In this project, teachers collaborated with Engineering professors in research on climate models and pavement distress. The teachers then translate that experience to inform PBL style class projects, with the goal of increasing student engagement and generating interest in career pathways.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn one way teachers may reach beyond traditional classroom walls to inspire students in fields relating to research, engineering, physics, and construction.

SPEAKERS:
Forest Shober (Physics Teacher)

“Content is the vehicle not the destination.” How to assess the NGSS practices.

Saturday, March 25 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Georgia World Congress Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Resources and Artifacts
Resources and Artifacts

STRAND: Teaching Strategies and Classroom Practice

Show Details

How do we assess both DCIs and SEPs in a way that is not overly complicated nor burdensome, yet pedagogically sound? There is a clear way to integrate your course content without sacrificing an emphasis on the NGSS practices. You will leave with resources to implement this in your classroom!

TAKEAWAYS:
After outlining the current debate, attendees will examine several effective approaches to deal with both content and skills, while considering issues of equity, differentiation, and opportunity for students of all ages.

SPEAKERS:
Elise Naramore (Pascack Hills High School: Montvale, NJ)

Technology tools to keep as we leave the pandemic behind

Saturday, March 25 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Georgia World Congress Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


STRAND: Teaching Strategies and Classroom Practice

Show Details

The poster will highlight and discuss some of the valuable technology resources that played a key role in allowing teachers to provide students with an equitable learning experience during the pandemic and how they can continue to be utilized as we return to the post pandemic classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
The poster will discuss strategies using tools such as Classkick, Gimkit, Blooket, and Edpuzzle to differentiate instruction in the classroom while encouraging persistence and achievement in students.

SPEAKERS:
Selene Verhofstad (Dobie High School: Houston, TX)

Climate Change, The Board Game: Teaching climate change and the carbon cycle through an interactive game

Saturday, March 25 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Georgia World Congress Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


STRAND: Teaching Strategies and Classroom Practice

Show Details

Modeling the multiple natural and human-initiated factors that impact global climate change can be daunting! A geoscientist and science educator will share a beta version of a climate change board game that is being developed as part of a National Science Foundation grant.

TAKEAWAYS:
This game provides students with a simulation of the causes and effects of factors that impact global climate. Participants will engage with the game and have an opportunity to provide feedback on the game elements. The game will eventually be offered as a free download.

SPEAKERS:
Kristin Rearden (The University of Tennessee, Knoxville: Knoxville, TN)

Integrating STEM through Social Studies

Saturday, March 25 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Georgia World Congress Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
ArizonaScienceCenter_NSTA-STEMAndSocialStudies.pdf

STRAND: Teaching Strategies and Classroom Practice

Show Details

At arrival participants would receive a green or grey colored paper. They would then be prompted with the question, How would environmental changes impact the population of both green and grey colored insects? After brainstorming they would read and view some graphics on the poster of the “Impacts of Industrialization,” looking at how scientists have long studied how environmental changes impact organisms over time. Then, educators would participate in an online simulation, they would play as a bird and eat the moths in the simulation. Participants would then debrief their observations, hopefully finding that dark forest environment represented what the environment was during and after the Industrial Revolution. The light colored trees became dark and bare, due to the harmful effects of the pollution; this made the lighter colored moths harder to see and therefore gave them an advantage to survive. Poster facilitators would them help educators brainstorm other SS/Science connections.

TAKEAWAYS:
Educators will find unique ways that they can incorporate their science and social studies lessons more frequently and naturally.

SPEAKERS:
Jennifer Petersen (Professional Development Facilitator: Phoenix, AZ), Judith Lozoya (Professional Development Facilitator: Phoenix, AZ)

Explore NSTAs Online Professional Development Opportunities

Saturday, March 25 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Georgia World Congress Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA Online Opportunities for PL

STRAND: Teaching Strategies and Classroom Practice

Show Details

Explore what NSTA is offering online to support your professional learning needs.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn about the variety of professional learning opportunities that NSTA has to offer.

SPEAKERS:
Michelle Phillips (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

KA-POW! When Pop Culture and STEM Ed Meet, the Results Are Amazing!

Saturday, March 25 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Georgia World Congress Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


STRAND: Teaching Strategies and Classroom Practice

Show Details

Pop culture is a shared language between teachers and students. Discrepant events from movies, television, video games, and even TikToks can promote argumentation and meaningful collaboration and are a novel way to approach teaching a STEM curriculum. Using pop culture to draw even distal connections between this world and the classroom increases engagement and helps to make learning accessible to populations historically underserved in STEM. With a bank of strategies developed over years of integrating pop culture in the classroom, we will show how to add relevance and accessibility to the STEM curriculum. We will illustrate how to seamlessly integrate these strategies into existing lesson plans and allow time for audience collaboration and brainstorming on how to incorporate these ideas into their classrooms. Web resources will be provided that are constantly being updated to keep content current and relevant.

TAKEAWAYS:
Mixing pop culture amps authentic engagement and understanding for all learners, including the historically underserved, reluctant, and ESL students.

SPEAKERS:
Matt Brady (Atkins High School: Winston-Salem, NC)

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