2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

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Rooms and times subject to change.
2 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

In-Class or Home School Integrated Math & Science Chemistry Research Projects

Saturday, October 28 • 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Share-a-thon Area



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
0-Workshop NSTA VitC Titration Handout GraphPaper.pdf
Workshop Vitamin C Lab - Graph Paper
0-Workshop NSTA VitC Titration Handout Instructions.pdf
1-NSTA Vit C Titration Handout.pdf
2-NSTA Vit C Clock Handout.pdf
Vitamin C Lab
3-NSTA Red Cabbage Handout.pdf
4-NSTA Foot to Hand.pdf
5-NSTA Milk Lab Handout.pdf

Show Details

This presentation revolves around the development of two distinctive research projects: Vitamin C Project and the Carbon Dioxide Project. In the Vitamin C project, participants extract juice from fruits and determine the vitamin C content using common household chemicals. In the Carbon Dioxide Project, participants quantitatively determine the amount of carbon dioxide and water produced when mixing specified amounts of baking soda and vinegar. The capture of carbon dioxide and water in clear balloons is an engaging way to apply basic mathematics to a chemical reaction. Embracing an integrative approach to teaching science and mathematics helps bridge the gap between knowledge learned and knowledge applied. This presentation will provide educators with innovative, standards-aligned projects that foster student interest in science and mathematics. For 3rd - 6th graders, these research projects can be delivered through storybooks!

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will gain full activity descriptions and handouts for at least three projects and learn how to integrate math skills into research projects that promote critical thinking and discovery (targeting 3rd - 12th grade).

SPEAKERS:
Sharron Jenkins (Georgia Gwinnett College: Lawrenceville, GA)

Physically Active Modeling For Comparing States of Matter

Saturday, October 28 • 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Share-a-thon Area



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Ideal Gas Law Students as Particles Activity Handout.docx
Physically Active Modeling Ideal Gas Laws Lesson Plan.docx
Physically Active Modeling States of Matter (1).pptx
Physically Active Modeling States of Matter Blank Handout NSTA 2023 .docx
Physically Active Modeling States of Matter Slides Handout NSTA 2023 KC.docx
QR Code Physically Active Modeling For States Of Matter NSTA 2023.png

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This activity has students/participants act as particles. To start, participants are given baseline information about how attractive forces between particles can vary from very strong to negligible, & that particles are always in motion. To model very strong forces participants link arms at the elbow, for moderately strong forces they hold hands, & for weak/negligible forces they can only hold each other’s pinky fingers. Participants start far apart & move very slowly to model a very cold temperature. At this speed, all of the participants are able to form an organized structure (solid). With each iteration the participants move faster. This results in the weak force group not being able to form structure (gas), the moderate force group being clumped together but not organized (liquid), & the strong force group still being able to form an organized structure (solid). Activity will then be modified to explain WHY gas law variables have the relationships they do (P,V,T, n).

TAKEAWAYS:
Students will not only know the properties of solids, liquids, and gasses, but will also be able to give in-depth explanations as to WHY the properties are different by behaving as the particles at different temperatures and with different attractive forces.

SPEAKERS:
Clark Ellis (The Kinkaid School)

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