2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

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Rooms and times subject to change.
32 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Extreme Living: Making Sense of Changing Weather Patterns and Designing Solutions

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

This presentation will provide teachers with a ready-to-teach Unit designed to help their students experience several Physical Science, Earth-Space Science, and Engineering NGSS standards. The unit addresses global weather patterns and the impacts of potential pattern changes. It also addresses thermal energy and its applications in building design. All middle school science teachers; whether new to the profession, new to phenomena-based learning, or seasoned veterans will find something new and exciting to bring back to their classrooms. This Unit combines my understanding of the middle school science classroom with expertise of curriculum writers at Pacific Education Institute. Teachers will receive help planning lessons, activities, and discussions. They will also take the role of a student to have first-hand experience with labs and activities. Teachers will receive a digital copy of all of the instructional materials including grading rubrics.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will learn how to teach and assess a dynamic 3-D unit addressing Physical Science and Earth Space Science NGSS Standards. Teachers will leave with editable access to all Unit materials. Teachers will get time and guidance on how to adapt the Unit to their classroom and student needs.

SPEAKERS:
Kathryn Chamberlain (Olympic High School: Silverdale, WA)

The EYE Curriculum: Exploring Architectural Design Features for Energy and Conservation Literacy

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2210


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

The EYE curriculum unit was co-created by middle school science teachers and architectural studies and science education faculty with the goal of improving students’ energy literacy and energy conservation practices. It consists of four modules that span six weeks of classroom instruction. The modules include investigations on energy and energy systems, natural and artificial lighting, building heating and cooling, and a capstone engineering project that guides students in designing a new classroom. The unit is place-based, using the local school building as a source of shared student experiences to connect to abstract energy concepts. Our workshop will overview the EYE unit structure and rationale and cover some of the key energy and architecture concepts embedded in the unit. We will provide hands-on experiences and a venue tour to model how building features can be leveraged to teach fundamental energy concepts in a real-world context for improved student engagement and learning.

TAKEAWAYS:
Our workshop venue will allow us to model how the EYE unit leverages tangible building features to enhance students’ understanding of abstract energy concepts. Attendees will receive a link to EYE’s classroom-ready materials, including engineering game cards, a budget spreadsheet, and slide decks.

SPEAKERS:
Meera Sood (Smithton Middle School: Columbia, MO), Suzy Otto (University of Missouri)

Teaching STEM and Humanities: Combining STEM Activities with Social Studies and History

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2207


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Incorporating social studies and history into STEM education doesn’t have to be difficult. Situations and events from the past can be used to present phenomena to students. Explore how you can use real world events and situations from World War II to engage your students with observable phenomena. In this workshop session led by an educator from The National WWII Museum, educators will explore how to incorporate a story, situation, or event from WWII into a phenomenon that meets NGSS standards. All of the activities also have a reading to accompany them for an added literacy component. The stories and activities will all come from our free curriculums: Little Engineers and Real World Science. Attendees will receive a hard copy of each curriculum. During this workshop, the activities demonstrated will feature Victory Gardens (parts of plants, growing seeds) and Earn Your Wings (engineering challenge with paper airplanes) activities.

TAKEAWAYS:
Incorporating social studies and history into STEM education doesn’t have to be difficult; situations and events from the past can be used to present phenomena to students.

SPEAKERS:
Kelly Goodner (Assistant Director of K-12 Programs: New Orleans, LA)

Smart Circuits: The Power of Logic Gates and Relays

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2104 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Hebert.pptx
Smart Circuits 2023 NSTA.pdf

STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

University of Illinois STEM educators have created classroom activities that allow students to conceptually explore topics in electricity. The workshop activities include assembling a breakout board that models a simplified power system for a small neighborhood. The circuit prototype responds to an outage and redirects the flow of power. Participants explore the components and characteristics of simple circuits, logic gates, and relays. They also engage in an energy delivery themed, escape room style activity developed by educators at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign with support from the US Department of Energy. This virtual environment presents a fictional, but based on real events, cascading blackout scenario and challenges players to find the cause. Participants analyze data from the blackout, determine what went wrong, and propose strategies to prevent another such event in the future. Time will be allotted for debriefing and sharing ideas for classroom implementation.

TAKEAWAYS:
The US power grid is the system of producers and consumers of electricity. It includes power generators, switches, substations, miles of power lines, and millions of transformers. The power grid is continually evolving as we integrate alternative power resources and invent technologies.

SPEAKERS:
Lara Hebert (Assistant Director, Engineering Public Engagement: Urbana, IL), Jana Sebestik (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign: Champaign, IL)

K-5 STEAM Labs: Maximizing Creativity Through Criteria and Constraints

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2204


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

This session consists of a student facing experience in which participants will engage in a sample lab activity followed by a collaborative debrief about the intentional decision making process behind the experience. Participants will leave with an understanding of how they can replicate experiences like this in their classroom, even in the absence of a designated space such as the STEAM Lab. Fairport Central School District has implemented STEAM Labs in each of its elementary schools. The vision is to support, challenge, and prepare all Fairport students to be Future Ready. By engaging with curricular and extracurricular projects and inquiries, students will utilize their innate creativity to actively construct knowledge. Students are at the center of the learning and are seen and valued for who they are. The Labs provide opportunities for students to tinker with ideas and collaborate with each other, to support the social-emotional and academic development of all learners.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how the use of criteria and constraints increase student engagement and creativity in the problem-solving process.

SPEAKERS:
Travis Wood (Fairport Central School District: No City, No State), Kristin Larsen (Honeoye Falls- Lima CSD: Honeoye Falls, NY)

Solving Problems Using Multiple Lenses

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2206


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Problem based learning uses observable events and processes that occur in the world. It is important to provide students with sensemaking opportunities that require them to combine their knowledge about multiple, cross-disciplinary DCIs, science and engineering practices, and cross cutting concepts, and ELA, math, and social studies, to design solutions to a real-world problem. The purpose of this session is to model the intentional combination of multiple disciplines to design a solution to the impact farming can have on the environment. During the session, participants will engage in designing a windmill that will help them reduce the impact of farming on the environment. We will explore the transdisciplinary nature of designing windmills and work in engineering teams to create the most efficient windmill. This presentation provides access to an NGSS Design Badge 5th grade unit, and strategies for combining multiple disciplines to design solutions to real-world problems.

TAKEAWAYS:
The audience will walk away with access to an NGSS Design Badge 5th grade unit that exemplifies strategies for engaging students in real-world problem-solving using multiple disciplines.

SPEAKERS:
Christi Sanderson (mySci Instructional Specialist: University City, MO), Lauren Ashman (Washington University in St. Louis Institute for School Partnership: Saint Louis, MO)

“Raising the Green Roof” for STEM Learning: A 4th Grade Water Cycle Unit

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2201


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

“Raising the Green Roof” is a 4-week interdisciplinary STEM unit developed by university architectural studies and science education faculty working with elementary educators. In the unit, students use place-based strategies to explore how human-built structures impact the environment and then learn that green roof designs can help restore the natural water cycle. Water cycle basics (evaporation, condensation, precipitation) are emphasized as students explore stormwater runoff, test water retention in various soils, model roof design features, and discover the role that plants play in water management. The unit culminates in an engineering design challenge with students building their own miniature doghouses, green roofs included. Our workshop introduces teachers to our unit’s structure and the science and sustainability concepts behind it. Teachers will also have an opportunity to practice several hands-on investigations and modelling activities from the unit’s lesson plans.

TAKEAWAYS:
This hands-on workshop provides an overview of Green Roof lessons and gives participants a chance to practice modelling and engineering investigations from the unit. Educators will learn architectural content knowledge and receive a link to classroom-ready curriculum and teacher support materials.

SPEAKERS:
Laura Zangori (University of Missouri: Columbia, MO), Suzy Otto (University of Missouri)

Space Telescopes: How they work, and how to simulate them in your classroom

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Julie Lee


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

An extension of our previous NASA/JWST ambassador and NSTA workshops, this session empowers educators with deeper understanding of orbiting observatories and provides an inherently engaging hands-on activity which works from pure STEM/STEAM fun to serious exploration of multi-wavelength astronomy. We provide gel filters that participants use with their phones to capture monochrome images at three wavelengths (630nm, 530nm & 470nm for red, green and blue). Participants then open their images in a free, browser-based image processing app to combine them into a "color" picture. This locks in an understanding of how "color" results from image processing. Then, participants choose NASA image files from an archive and repeat the process -- only now, they are assigning RG&B to wavelengths that are not actually visible to the eye. The tool we use includes both presets to make this fun as an introductory activity, and an array of math-driven functionality for deep dives into image processing.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will learn to process multi-wavelength image sets to create color images from space telescopes and your own devices. This leads to a deeper understanding of space-based astronomy and how space telescope images are made – and provides a classroom activity that is fun, rich, and economical.

SPEAKERS:
Donna Kaiser (Stamford High School: Stamford, CT), Vincent Urbanowski (Academy of Information Technology & Engineering: Stamford, CT)

Out of School and Into STEM! Designing an Engaging, Authentic, and Relevant Out-of-School STEM Program

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 C


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Opportunities abound for young people to learn about science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) in a range of settings outside of the classroom. They can engage with STEM in summer camps, after-school programs, Boys & Girls Clubs, and even trendy birthday parties. Numerous studies document the benefits of effective out-of-school STEM learning—e.g., increased interest in STEM, enriched knowledge of STEM ideas, enhanced confidence, and a sense of accomplishment. Given the benefits of out-of-school STEM learning and to increase access to high-quality STEM experiences for our middle schoolers, we developed an after-school program for them to enjoy STEM in engaging, authentic, and relevant ways. We will (1) share the framework/commitments that guided the design of our “Out-of-School and Into STEM” club, (2) model an abbreviated club session, and (3) provide resources for participants that may be helpful in designing their own out-of-school STEM experiences for students.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will be provided with a framework and resources to guide the design of an out-of-school STEM Club and participate in a design-based club activity.

SPEAKERS:
Raven Brzeszkiewicz (Student: , IN), Jared Simoneaux (Science Teacher: , IN), Megan Johnson (Science Teacher), Lynn Bryan (Purdue University: West Lafayette, IN)

From Student to Inventor: How to Get Started

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Are you ready to start inventing with your students but don’t know how to start? Do you have students with innovative ideas who need help protecting those ideas? Intellectual property can be a complex and often confusing topic, but it's essential for students to understand how to protect their own ideas and creations. Many teachers recognize the need to help their students protect their ideas and inventions when they work on science and engineering projects, but may not have a background in IP or the resources to teach it effectively. This presentation will provide an overview of how to teach IP and invention education in science classrooms, with a focus on practical and hands-on activities that engage students. Participants will leave with resources and ideas for incorporating invention education and IP into their own classrooms.This presentation is suitable for science teachers of all levels, from elementary to high school. No prior knowledge of IP is necessary.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will leave with resources and ideas for incorporating invention and intellectual property education into their classrooms. This presentation is suitable for science teachers of all levels, from elementary to high school. No prior knowledge of IP is necessary.

SPEAKERS:
Kathy Hoppe (STEMisED, Inc: No City, No State), Kathleen Lanman (U.S. Patent and Trademark Office: Alexandria, VA)

International STEM Career Role Models: Curated Children’s Books at the Forefront of K-6 STEM Lessons

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2201


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Research indicates that teachers need to address STEM career awareness and connect to students’ lives. Our goal is to highlight STEM careers/role models across the globe through using children’s books to anchor STEM lessons. The books are chosen to cover various peoples/cultures from around the world. Using books to engage students in thinking about how STEM connects to various cultures across the globe can be a powerful learning tool and can lead to important classroom discourse regarding cultural awareness (Yoon, 2022). For example, Tu Youyou’s Discovery: Finding a Cure for Malaria by Songju Ma Daemicke focuses on returning to Chinese herbal medicine to discover treatment for malaria. In the same manner, One Plastic Bag by Miranda Paul, highlights Istaou Ceesay’s true story from Gambia. The main character in this book started a grassroots movement to recycle plastic bags since they were causing pollution and negatively impacting livestock. Participants will be actively engaged!

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will engage in hands-on STEM mini-lessons in small groups. Each participant will explore several picture books highlighting STEM careers and people from across the globe.

SPEAKERS:
Sumreen Asim (Indiana University Southeast: New Albany, IN)

Talk like your cell phone does (an inquiry lab)

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Jay McShann B


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Working in teams, students take a short analog message and convert it to binary code for cell phone transmission. Students then send those zero’s and one over a carrier wave using a form of amplitude modulation to another team. At the other end the message is decoded and rewritten in analog form. which message was first? How close was it? A discussion of challenges the students’ faced in acting like a DSP (digital signal processor) lets student see some of the challenges of the original binary code and how subsequent forms of coding came about to address some of those challenges. Students discover the binary code they used was Morse code. Students then code and send a different message using the original 5-digit computer code. After racing to send their messages, students are guided through a follow-up discussion on the pros and cons of the new (Baudot) computer code used.

TAKEAWAYS:
Students will understand some of the challenges faced in digital signal processing as sending digital information evolved by completing a lab activity where they will code and decode messages into a digital format for transmission and receiving, similar to how cell phones work.

SPEAKERS:
John Clark (Volusia Online Learning: Port Orange, FL)

Physics Through Flight

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Lester Young B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
National Free Flight Society Homepage
Presentation Slides
Science Olympiad Homepage
Science Olympiad Program Information

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Ever since the Wright Brothers first took flight in Kitty Hawk, the idea of powered flight has fascinated and captivated people. Unfortunately, despite flight's engaging nature and connections to fundamental physics concepts it is not a common topic in classrooms. Throughout our combined 97 years of existence our organizations, the National Free Flight Society and Science Olympiad, have been working to change this reality. In this session, we will introduce attendees to the idea of free flight model aircraft, demonstrate how these aircraft can be flown safely in schools, and share the variety of instructional resources that are immediately available for classroom use. Following this, we will identify ways attendees can take what they have learned and the activities available to enhance their classroom instruction. The session will close with a demonstration flight of a free flight model aircraft built from start to finish during this 60-minute session.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn the art of the possible when it comes to using flight as a topic to engage students in their study of forces, free body diagrams, and Newton's Laws.

SPEAKERS:
David Lindley (President: Lisle, IL), Julie Newman (Engineer), John Loehr (Science Olympiad: Oakbrook Terrace, IL)

Space-Based Observatories – Use Them Like an Astronomer

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Lester Young A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Presentational content will include a high level overview of NASA’s Great Observatories and other past and present orbiting telescopes, how their missions are coordinated, and how they work in concert to provide full spectrum data from across the sky in bands from gamma down to far infrared – almost all of which are invisible to the human eye. In the workshop portion, participants will access archived astronomical data from orbiting observatories using the same browser based tools used by astronomers. They will process their datasets using a variety of tools and techniques for reducing data, vetting objects, and generating results, such as Spectral Energy Distribution, Color-Color and Color-Magnitude plots. Teachers will bring this experience back to their classrooms adding depth of knowledge to astronomy content they may teach, as well as a deeper understanding of the conduct of science research.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn to access astronomical data such as monochrome images at various wavelengths and wavelength magnitude measurements for thousands of stars at a time just as professional astronomers do, and how to process such data for research using techniques of professional astronomy.

SPEAKERS:
Donna Kaiser (Stamford High School: Stamford, CT), Vincent Urbanowski (Academy of Information Technology & Engineering: Stamford, CT)

Buildings, Bridges, and Structures, Oh My!

Friday, October 27 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Arch Bridges.pdf
Here is worksheet for arch bridges.
Beam Bridges.pdf
Beam Bridges Worksheet
Cable-Stayed Bridges.pdf
Here is a worksheet for cable-stayed bridges.
Cantilever Bridges.pdf
Here is a worksheet for cantilever bridges.
Copy of NSTA Conference_ Bridges, Buildings, and Structures, Oh My!.pdf
Here is my slideshow from the workshop I gave.
Famous Bridges Around the World.pdf
Here are some famous bridges from around the world.
Suspension Bridges.pdf
Here is a worksheet for suspension bridges.
Truss Bridges .pdf
Here is a worksheet for truss bridges.

STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

What student has not been amazed by the incredible bridges and buildings constructed by architects! How many of them have wanted to try and design their own structures? In this hands-on workshop, the participants will have an opportunity to view some of the creative buildings and bridges my second graders have constructed using mostly recyclable materials. They will hear about some of the record-breaking buildings that have been constructed around the world, and they will also have a chance to see a short video about some of the most unusual structures ever built. Before commencing any of the building, the participants will receive information on the different types of bridges built throughout the ages. These include the covered bridge, the truss, suspension, cantilever, beam, cable-stayed, and arch bridges. Once the participants have a general knowledge of the different types of bridges, they will then have an opportunity to work as a team to build a bridge or a building.

TAKEAWAYS:
In this session, participants will learn how to develop an engineering unit for elementary students where they design and build their own skyscrapers and bridges. Relevant videos will be shown and student work will be showcased.

SPEAKERS:
Joan Gillman (The Browning School: New York, NY)

Transdisciplinary STEM: Making Disciplines Converge to Engage All Students in STEM Learning

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 C


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Find out how engaging students with compelling and complex socio-scientific problems necessitates student learning in many disciplines to design solutions. Gain strategies to support students in transdisciplinary learning and apply that learning to problem-solving with shared resources and examples.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn how to engage students in learning that centers on addressing pressing social challenges and be able to describe transdisciplinary approaches to education.

SPEAKERS:
Rob Wallace (NSTA: Kenner, LA)

Designing with Purpose: Leveraging Student Ideas in the Engineering Design Process

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2104 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

We will unpack the purpose of each phase within the design cycle (Ask-Imagine-Plan-Create-Improve) and the role it plays in developing and showcasing student understanding of scientific concepts and their development of SEPs. Students often jump quickly from asking questions to designing solutions. Participants will engage in an activity that emphasizes the importance of slowing down the engineering process to zoom in on intentional brainstorming and planning that encourages students to think creatively, yet logically, about their ideas. We will focus on helping students articulate their thinking and communicate their scientific ideas throughout the design process. We will look at how these ideas can be mirrored in the improve phase to allow students to reflect on their process, gather and communicate new findings, and purposefully redesign. Through well-developed design projects, elementary students can build strong scientific understanding and develop critical 21st-century skills.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will take away ideas for enhancing the engineering design process for their students in order to leverage student ideas and collaboration to create better engineering solutions.

SPEAKERS:
Briana Trager (Graduate Student: , NC)

STEAM is Elementary

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Presentation materials

STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

The participants will follow a sequence of activities that align with a progression of the skills found in the PreK-2 engineering standards (NGSS). During the session, the participants will complete the hands-on activities in order to bring them back to their classrooms or modify them as they see fit. The first activity has the participants cut up a water cooler paper cup (cone shape) in order to maximize the “float time” after it was placed on a box fan pointed upwards. By watching the different designs, they will be encouraged to make a second design to test. The second activity has the participants making straw rockets using the following materials: plastic straw, clay, card stock. Using a straw rocket launcher, the participants will see how far their rocket goes. Last activity includes the designing and testing a sail for a car. Teaching materials will be provided, along with ways to encourage science fairs and family STEAM nights for elementary grades.

TAKEAWAYS:
During the session, the participants will complete hands-on STEAM activities that they can use or modify with their students the next day!!!

SPEAKERS:
Jeanine Doxsee (Franklin Early Childhood Center: Hewlett, NY), Brian Terry (Hewlett-Woodmere Public Schools: Woodmere, NY)

Changing the Game with STEM in Family Engagement

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 B


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Participants will experience multiple hands-on playful learning activities that engage young children and their families. Participants will use plastic bricks that will help inspire ideas about STEM learning outcomes that can be achieved through play. This workshop will engage participants in a knowledge journey of playful learning, STEM inquiry, and modeling educator practices. The session will share best practices for engaging young children and families with STEM. Our program session will help the audience using knowledge to create relevance in programs to prepare student participants for lifelong STEM learning and inquiry. In the workshop they will have the opportunity to interact with others in the session, engaging in mutual inquiry, teamwork and building relationships.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will experience multiple hands-on playful learning activities that engage children and their families. Participants will use plastic bricks that will help inspire ideas about STEM learning outcomes that can be achieved through play.

SPEAKERS:
Kathryn Sample (Specialist, Education), Tammy Pankey (Director of Education)

Cellular Connections

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2102 B


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Presenters will be using resources created through the Master Teacher of Invention Program which is a program of the United States Patent and Trade Office. Participants will begin by looking at patents related to the telephone and putting them in chronological order. Next the participants will generate ideas about innovations regarding the telephone. The participants will then learn about the 4 different types of intellectual property (Copyright, Patent, Trademark, Trade Secret). From there, participants will experience the design process of identifying problems and finding solutions related to cell phone usage.This workshop will be taught as if participants are students experiencing the lesson; therefore, participants will be up and moving around. Resources from the United States Patent and Trade Office will be shared.

TAKEAWAYS:
Educators will walk away with a lesson focused on invention and intellectual property created by teachers in the Master Teacher of Invention and Intellectual Property Program that can immediately be implemented in the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Juan Valentin (Education Advisor), Denise Henggeler (Northeast Nodaway)

Incorporating the Engineering Design Process in the Elementary Grades

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 A


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

This engineering workshop for elementary teachers is designed to provide educators with a foundation in engineering practices that can be applied in the classroom. The workshop will be divided into three segments covering the following topics: 1. Introduction to Engineering: The workshop will start with an introduction to the Engineering Design Process and its applications in our daily lives. Workshop attendees will learn how to help young students make connections to their own lives. 2. Hands-on Activities: A hands-on activity (building a watering device) will be be included in the workshop to provide teachers with a first-hand experience of the engineering design process. Teachers will work in teams to brainstorm, design, build, test, and refine their prototypes, much like they will ask their students to do. 3. Curriculum Integration: A discussion and ideas on how to integrate engineering concepts into the elementary classroom curriculum.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn the importance of incorporating the Engineering Design Practices in their elementary classrooms as well as ways to teach this to young learners in a way that is engaging, exciting, and memorable.

SPEAKERS:
Shawn O’Neill (Professor)

Clean Cut - Learning about Simple Machines and Engineering Design

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2102 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
CleanCut

STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Simple machines are historically a difficult subject to teach due in part to limited integration with other content. The Clean Cut unit is suitable for upper elementary students and combines the concept of the wedge and the engineering design process. The goal is not only to introduce students to simple machines but also to introduce them to the nature of engineering design. Throughout the unit, students learn that one perfect solution does not exist; instead, they learn to tolerate and learn from failures. The students learn why simple machines are used in everyday life and design a solution to a problem while learning about and using an engineering design process. The students refine their design to fit within the constraints and criteria set by a client. Students test the design and collect qualitative data to refine their design. The unit includes a summative assessment in the form of a letter to the client describing what was learned about simple machines and engineering design.

TAKEAWAYS:
The context of the lesson is designing a tool to split soap for use by people who have been through a natural disaster. Participants will learn about the integrated approach using engineering design and simple machines, experience part of the unit, and receive the handouts for use in the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
William Walker (Assistant Director, CATALYST: No City, No State), Sopheak Seng (Mr.: Lafayette, IN)

Vehicle Efficiency: An Engineering Design Challenge to Promote Equity in the Science Classroom

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Lester Young B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Vehicle Efficiency_ An EDC to Promote Equity in Science.pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Authentic engineering challenges are a highlight of my physics courses because of the increase in student engagement and depth of content understanding. I’ve also experienced the ways these design challenges level the playing field for all because problem solving and applying knowledge is valued. Yet, despite the many benefits of integrating engineering design in science classrooms, this component of the NGSS can easily be overlooked. In this workshop, participants immerse in the world of engineering design and optimization. Teacher teams will engage in a design task and subsequent design optimization. We’ll debrief strategies for incorporating engineering design activities into high school units and discuss techniques for implementation, while focusing on the engineering design cycle and the importance of optimization. Observations on how these design challenges invite all students into the discipline of physics will be shared. The takeaways are applicable to all science disciplines.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will take away a complete Engineering Design Challenge (EDC) that includes strategies for incorporating an EDC into an energy unit, highlighted disciplinary core ideas, templates for student analysis and reflection, and a three-dimensional assessment based on the EDC.

SPEAKERS:
Susan Swan (Vashon High School: Vashon, WA)

Session Name: Solids: Neglected State of Chemistry

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Colonial Ballroom



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Brassing a Penny Student Instructions
Presentation Slideshow
Test Tube Geology Lab Student Directions

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

various demonstrations will be used to continue to compare and contrast types of solids (materials) and their bonding and properties. For example, (through video) a ceramic alumina rod and metal aluminum rod will be heated to showcase differences in melting point, conductivity, and density. Teachers will also participate in an activity that precipitates copper crystals from copper sulfate. This particular activity mimics how native metals can crystallize in the earth crust naturally. In addition, teachers will participate in a lab that shows how metal atoms can easily be mixed to make an alloy. The concept of solid state diffusion will be discussed.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how to teach basic chemistry concepts using common everyday materials like metals, ceramics, glass, and polymers. Hands-on STEM activities, demonstrations, and labs will make learning these chemistry concepts more engaging and relevant.

SPEAKERS:
Gissel McDonald (Spring Hill High School: Spring Hill, KS), Sarah Ortiz (Teacher: Springfield, NE)

Engineering Design and Coding in the Chemistry Classroom?

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Big Joe Turner B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Engineering Design in the Chemistry Classroom.pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Adding engineering design and coding in the context of a core course like Chemistry may be difficult for teachers. This session will have participants collecting real world data, designing a solution to a real world problem, and adding a coding twist to that solution. Participants will either use a pH sensor or a temperature sensor to collect data, code a microcontroller to have an output of a fan or RGB LEDs, and play a sound. No coding or design experience necessary.

TAKEAWAYS:
Coding and engineering design in the Chemistry classroom based on real world data collection.

SPEAKERS:
Chris Coker (Camden Fairview High School: Camden, AR), Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA)

METRICS: Maximizing Engagement Through Regular Immersion in Computer Science

Saturday, October 28 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2101


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Winchester is 1 of 10 public schools in the country, out of 43 schools in total, to receive the coveted Education Innovation and Research Early-Phase grant from the U.S. Department of Education. Through the Metrics program, students at John Kerr Elementary School and Garland Quarles Elementary School have an immersive experience with computer science and computational thinking which are driving the 21st century economy. This session is meant to be a dissemination of our five year project, to share what we have learned about immersing students and teachers in grades K-4 in computers science, and to provide resources and time for participants to experience some of our activities and build a trajectory for building their own computer science program.

TAKEAWAYS:
Build your own pathway to develop techies {thinkers} and tinkerers in your space.

SPEAKERS:
Amy Thomas (John Kerr Elementary School: Winchester, VA), Jennifer Ramsey (Garland R. Quarles Elementary School: Winchester, VA), Jennifer LaBombard-Daniels (Winchester Public Schools: Winchester, VA)

STEM Extravaganza

Saturday, October 28 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2104 A


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

In the presentation, I will be sharing STEM activities for grades 6-8. The activities shared will include STEM icebreakers, STEM projects for content units, and other fun and engaging STEM activities. Get ready to have a STEM-sational time as you will be creating projects to take back to your school. I will also provide links to activities/projects that participants can use that will not be demonstrated/experienced that will align the concept of cells to TEKS for grades 6-8.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will experience hands-on learning for grades 6-8. This experience will give attendees fun and engaging activities for students to learn about STEM.

SPEAKERS:
Amy Rush (Lufkin Middle School: Lufkin, TX), Rebecca Walker (Tays Junior High School: Katy, TX)

Metals: Digging Beneath the Surface

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2206



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Slideshow + Resources

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

In this workshop, participants will learn about the science behind metal properties through hands-on activities. They will create a simple low-melt alloy and generate a binary phase diagram. That phase diagram will be analyzed and lead to a discussion of melting points of alloys. Participants will explore the effects of heat and working on metal properties, and discover how to manipulate steel properties through annealing, quenching, and tempering. The steel samples include a high carbon and low carbon steel: bobby pin and paper clip. Participants will also compare the properties of copper wire to those of steel samples, gaining a deeper understanding of different metal behaviors."

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will explore how students can change metal properties through alloying, heat-treating, and cold-working. Classroom activities enhance understanding of both atomic structure of metals and real world engineering relevance.

SPEAKERS:
Sarah Ortiz (Teacher: Springfield, NE), Gissel McDonald (Spring Hill High School: Spring Hill, KS)

Engineering Connects Classrooms to STEM Careers

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 C


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Looking for ways to integrate engineering in your science curriculum? Join us to become familiar with freely-available, high-quality instructional materials that create opportunities for students to apply science ideas to solve real-world problems, gain confidence and see themselves in STEM careers.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn how to engage students in learning that centers on addressing pressing social challenges and be able to describe transdisciplinary approaches to education.

SPEAKERS:
Rob Wallace (NSTA: Kenner, LA)

Incorporating Engineering Design Challenges into the NGSS Classroom

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 A


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Today's mission - should you choose to accept - will require teams of engineers to design and build a bridge that will hold at least 20 coins. During this lesson, engineers will be asking questions and defining problems to fully understand the mission, criteria, and constraints. Next, we will design our bridges and sell our design ideas to the team, selecting the optimal ideas to incorporate into the group design. Then, we will construct and test our bridges, identify failure points, and recommend improvements. Teachers will receive a copy of ready-made engineering design worksheet that can be utilized in their classrooms to facilitate incorporation of engineering design challenges (and can be modified to fit any K-12 classroom]. Following the design challenge, presenters will offer a range of applications for design challenges making this content relevant to all disciplines. Examples include protein folding, electromagnets, balancing forces, and Rube Goldberg Machines.

TAKEAWAYS:
Educators will take away materials for teaching the engineering design process that can be modified to fit ANY K-12 classroom, as well as a list of possible projects with connections to various DCI strands.

SPEAKERS:
Bailey Johnson (Hastings Public Schools: Hastings, NE), Kristen Benton (Kenesaw Public Schools: Kenesaw, NE)

Redox: The Applications of Corrosion Chemistry

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2502 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Slideshow + Resources

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

This presentation will cover the simple principles of redox reactions and corrosion chemistry. Attendees will learn about the transfer of electrons between species, how to write equations for oxidation and reduction, and the factors that affect the rate of corrosion. The presentation will also explore the properties of metals such as zinc and aluminum and their usefulness in various applications. Practical applications of redox reactions and corrosion chemistry will be discussed, including galvanization and reduction of metal ores. Hands-on activities and audience participation will be encouraged throughout the presentation. By the end, attendees will have a solid understanding of the chemistry behind redox reactions and corrosion and how this knowledge can be applied in real-world situations.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn hands-on labs, activities, and demos that can be used to teach about corrosion. A look at corrosion will lead to a discussion of how to teach redox principles in a simple way in the classroom. Examples of redox in action in the real world will make this relevant to students.

SPEAKERS:
Sarah Ortiz (Teacher: Springfield, NE), Gissel McDonald (Spring Hill High School: Spring Hill, KS)

Integrating Nature-Inspired Invention and Engineering into the Biology Classroom through Case-Based Learning

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 F


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Case, project-based, and invention education lessons for high school students provide context for the learner through real-world scenarios that engage students in inventing while teaching NGSS cross-cutting concepts, scientific processes, engineering, and design. Participants in this workshop will learn how to engage students in nature-inspired invention, engineering, and intellectual property protection through a transdisciplinary lesson about the invention of Velcro. Biological systems and evolutionary adaptations inspire innovations and inventions that spark inventors to solve complex human problems. Participants will learn how to engage their students in creating nature-inspired inventions using resources provided by the US Patent and Trademark Office.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn how to integrate engineering design with biological concepts through nature-inspired invention and transdisciplinary learning by implementing case, project-based, and invention education.

SPEAKERS:
Jorge Valdes (U.S. Patent and Trademark Office: Alexandria, VA), Reginald Duncan (U.S. Patent and Trademark Office: Alexandria, VA), Kathy Hoppe (STEMisED, Inc: No City, No State)

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