2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

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Rooms and times subject to change.
35 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Students and Challenging Texts—Graphic Narratives, Lay Summaries, and Cooperative Groups

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2105



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Note to participants
Slide presentation (info, resources, agenda)
Students and Challenging Texts
Workshop on helping students with challenging texts. Folder with a number of resources and examples.

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Science writing is an essential part of authentic science. However, both perception and reality suggest that science texts of various genres are difficult and challenging for many students. What can a teacher do to help students meet challenges so that they can realize the beauty and significance of pivotal works in the history of science, groundbreaking contemporary research, and the deep reflections found in scientific creative non-fiction? In this workshop we will try out techniques based on cooperative groups who create graphic narratives and lay summaries. An assortment of texts will be available to explore, like the concluding paragraph to Darwin’s Origin of Species and the story of Carbon by Primo Levi. Experience in the classroom will be shared where understanding of the texts is achieved by students, including reluctant readers and English language learners.

TAKEAWAYS:
Great, significant, and sometimes difficult written works in science can become accessible to students through cooperative groups, graphic narratives, and lay summaries.

SPEAKERS:
Richard Frazier (retired)

Developing Visual Literacy in Science: Strategies and Resources

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2102 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Participants will experience using dialogue structures and literacy skills in the science classroom. Research shows that when students are engaged with the content and are allowed the chance to make sense of it for themselves, they will learn more. Participants will experience mini lessons that incorporate phenomena and showcase research-proven structures. Participants will be actively learning strategies that can be implemented in classrooms to increase visual literacy amongst students. Strategies include reading, writing, speaking, and graphing skills. Science examples will be modeled. There will be collaborative discussions on how these strategies can be incorporated into a variety of grade levels. Throughout these strategies, we will focus on the dialogue structures set in place to encourage all students to participate and use the academic language. Each of these structures focuses on the teacher being the facilitator of the learning, rather than leading the discussions.

TAKEAWAYS:
Takeaways include: 1. Identify how literacy and dialogue are an integral part in sensemaking; 2. Engage in examples of activities that integrate speaking, listening, and reading into the science classroom; and 3. Pick up tips to promote retention of vocabulary through scaffolding.

SPEAKERS:
Molly Niedens (Tays Junior High School: Katy, TX)

Cracking the CER Code: How a Mi-STAR Lesson Can Help Your Students Construct Explanations and Argue from Evidence with Confidence

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2102 A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Cracking the CER Code Handout
Cracking the CER Code Slides

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Mi-STAR is a program at Michigan Technological University dedicated to quality NGSS-aligned curriculum since 2015. We listen carefully to teachers and respond with support. One of the struggles teachers mention most often is in scaffolding students to write CERs and arguments. In our presentation, we propose an addition to the traditional template: the scientific principles, which are then combined with evidence in the reasoning statement. Later, we add another part: a space for using persuasive writing to construct an argument. We model activities from our 5E lesson throughout. Teachers collaborate to create CERs, and to evaluate arguments written by others. Then, they construct their own arguments using a productive talk routine and persuasive language prompts. Participants gain confidence in supporting students to construct explanations and arguments, as well as get first-hand experience with a lesson, tools, and activities they can take back to their classroom for immediate use.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will leave with clear and concise definitions of reasoning, explanations, and argumentation, along with a lesson plan, activities, and templates to help students define and construct all three in the science classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Jenne VandePanne (Michigan Technological University/Newaygo Public Schools: Newaygo, MI), Chris Geerer (Mi-STAR: , MI)

Teaching Climate Fact through Climate Fiction

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2105


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Participants will experience the potential of teaching climate science through the lens of writing climate fiction. We will learn about the history of the science fiction genre as well as the newer subgenre of climate fiction ("CliFi") and note key contributions to science through innovative and speculative thinking made possible through literature. Participants will experience a crash course version of a unit in which students write a climate fiction novella integrating NGSS and CCSS for Science and Technical Subjects which will spur their curiosity in what “could be” with regard to climate science solutions. Participants will dive into aspects of unit facilitation of the writing and reading processes and leave with a framework for K-12 implementation as well as publication pathways. This experience can be personalized to meet student need through Universal Design for Learning strategies.

TAKEAWAYS:
Through implementation of a climate fiction writing unit, teachers can introduce skills and habits of mind that support youth innovation in addressing climate issues.

SPEAKERS:
Erin Lark (Kognity: Stockholm, 0)

Is Bigfoot Among Us? Follow the Evidence to Combat Pseudoscience

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Basie Ballroom B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Science is often portrayed as conducted in a simple linear way (i.e., the scientific method). But this is rarely true in actual scientific practice. Instead of a step-by-step series of actions, science is conducted more cyclically, with scientists working back and forth between pursuing exploration and discovery, assessing benefits and outcomes, and developing analysis and feedback. At the core of this process is evidence, against which ideas in science are constantly tested. Evidence is what drives all scientific understanding. By examining environmental DNA (eDNA) collected from areas where recent Bigfoot sightings have occurred, participants can provide students with a logical and rational way scientists can use evidence to dispel the pseudoscience of cryptozoology. Upon completing this activity, attendees can apply their new knowledge to how eDNA is currently used to identify viruses and diseases in wastewater. Resources: https://ncse.ngo/supporting-teachers/classroom-resources

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will explore and appreciate the importance of evidence to the scientific process by taking a deep dive into an NGSS storyline sequence developed to help students understand that science must be substantiated by multiple lines of evidence to be accepted by the scientific community.

SPEAKERS:
Blake Touchet (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA), Ericca Thornhill (Mizzou Academy: Columbia, MO), Lin Andrews (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA)

Science Journals That WORK

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2205



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Science Journals that WORK!

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Are science journals getting in the way of your students learning? Are they becoming just "another" thing we have students do in their everyday routine? Time to spice up those science journals! Join us as we explore the science behind journals and notebooks, discuss best practices for science journaling, and highlight resources that work. Don't let journaling get in the way. Embrace student's writing and learn how to make science journals work for you. Participants will learn how to set up science journals at the beginning of the year, do different experiments and activities to show how to use science journals, and review best strategies to use for student learning.

TAKEAWAYS:
How do you introduce journals, organize, maintain, scafforld, etc., while teaching students to use it as their own personal tool? Teachers would walk away with a better understanding of how to make journals meaningful to students and help me see/understand their learning.

SPEAKERS:
Joe Shaughnessy (John Thomas School of Discovery Partner School: Nixa, MO)

International STEM Career Role Models: Curated Children’s Books at the Forefront of K-6 STEM Lessons

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2201


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Research indicates that teachers need to address STEM career awareness and connect to students’ lives. Our goal is to highlight STEM careers/role models across the globe through using children’s books to anchor STEM lessons. The books are chosen to cover various peoples/cultures from around the world. Using books to engage students in thinking about how STEM connects to various cultures across the globe can be a powerful learning tool and can lead to important classroom discourse regarding cultural awareness (Yoon, 2022). For example, Tu Youyou’s Discovery: Finding a Cure for Malaria by Songju Ma Daemicke focuses on returning to Chinese herbal medicine to discover treatment for malaria. In the same manner, One Plastic Bag by Miranda Paul, highlights Istaou Ceesay’s true story from Gambia. The main character in this book started a grassroots movement to recycle plastic bags since they were causing pollution and negatively impacting livestock. Participants will be actively engaged!

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will engage in hands-on STEM mini-lessons in small groups. Each participant will explore several picture books highlighting STEM careers and people from across the globe.

SPEAKERS:
Sumreen Asim (Indiana University Southeast: New Albany, IN)

Making it Middle Earth- Integrating Maps, Weather, and Geology in an Imaginative Literature Connection

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2204


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Participants will be given an outline map of Middle Earth. They will color-code landforms including mountains, hills, plateaus, and plains and then add bodies of water including oceans, seas, lakes, and rivers. Given weather scenarios, they will add weather features to the map and make a weather report for a specific location. Participants will then read literature descriptions from the series and match igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks on the map.

TAKEAWAYS:
This activity is especially geared toward gifted students. Participants will see how to apply earth science concepts to a fictional world.

SPEAKERS:
Laurie Boulden (Warner University: Lake Wales, FL)

Phenomenal Lesson: Hudson Bay River Ecology

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2104 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

How do populations fluctuate in the Hudson River ecosystem, and how do these changes affect the larger ecological community? Using data and hands-on investigations, we will explore how food webs and the abiotic resources have changed in response to the zebra mussel invasion. Teachers will get a lesson explaining how the zebra mussel invasion affected the food web of the Hudson River and be able to explain at least two connections within the food web that were affected using evidence from provided data. Data will include charts and graphs that depict organisms commonly found in the Hudson. When utilizing this lesson in the classroom, students will know what lives in the Hudson River, and will be able to create & study a food web drawing to represent the organisms living in the river. They will also know that the Hudson River food web is changing in response to the zebra mussel invasion, and will be able to make predictions about how native organisms will be affected by this invasion.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will get a lesson explaining how the zebra mussel invasion affected the food web of the Hudson River and be able to explain at least two connections within the food web that were affected using evidence from provided data.

SPEAKERS:
Karen Pennywell (Cardiff Junior High School: Katy, TX), Sandra Rodriguez (Katy ISD: Katy, TX)

AUTHOR: Once Upon a Physical Science Book: Real Science, Real Literacy Instruction

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 C


Show Details

The session will open with having participants work through pieces of Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 from Once Upon a Physical Science Book. We will play with marbles to explore inertia, read about inertia's effect on kids in a school bus, and write an explanation of inertia. Then we'll try out gumdrop wave machines read, an article on bat echolocation, and outline a short letter that students could write after doing the reading. Next, we will discuss the "shape" of the lesson we just worked through, called a literacy learning cycle. From there, we will look at several specific difficulties that arise for students when they are asked to read and write (expectations, background knowledge, and meaningful writing). These topics will illustrate why a literacy learning cycle is so helpful. Finally, we will talk briefly about how the Once Upon a Science Book series can serve as a resource for literacy learning cycles.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will be introduced to the literacy learning cycle format, in which hands-on work precedes meaningful reading and writing activities. They will see how this system works by participating in lessons on wave motion and inertia.

SPEAKERS:
Matthew Hackett (Delta Woods Middle School: Blue Springs, MO), Jodi Wheeler-Toppen (Author/ Staff Development: Atlanta, GA)

Literacy in Science

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Lester Young B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Literacy in Science Slides

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

This session is geared towards new teachers and veteran teachers alike, who are interested in supporting their students with literacy strategies. Students can struggle to access information from nonfiction text, however, with the right tools they can not only learn science, but be able to use that knowledge in the classroom without the instructor lecturing on that information. By developing their skills in pre, during and post reading they will become more confident in their science literacy and be able to use it as evidence in their daily practices. Some of the strategies in the presentation include: anticipation guides, vocabulary front loading, chunking, annotating, gist statements and vocabulary connections. The audience will learn about several strategies, as well as experience a lesson from a student’s point of view. There will also be time allotted to create a classroom ready lesson from text with support from the presenters.

TAKEAWAYS:
The main takeaways from our session are ready to use pre, during, and post reading strategies that work for a variety of grade levels and with a variety of texts.

SPEAKERS:
Deanna Warkins (Adlai E. Stevenson High School: Lincolnshire, IL), Kellie Dean (Adlai E. Stevenson High School: Lincolnshire, IL)

Implementing the Hexagonal Thinking Strategy in the Elementary Classroom

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2203



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA 2023 Handout.pdf
NSTA Hexagonal Thinking in the Elementary Classroom.pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The hexagonal thinking strategy stems from a business background and made its way into the secondary education realm in the past five years. It has not been utilized in the elementary setting, so I joined with a local 4th grade classroom teacher to determine the best way to implement the activity with younger students. The strategy is simple: the teacher creates a set of hexagons for each group with vocabulary and concepts. The students work together to determine connections and how everything is interrelated. It is then glued to a large paper and annotated with students' thoughts about the connections. At the same time, the most important aspect is the conversation among students throughout the activity. We conducted six classroom sessions over the course of 3 months to find what worked and what did not. We also collected student work, quotes, and videos with feedback from students. Although the focus was on science , we included a variety of topics and cross-curricular sessions.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will experience the strategy from a student POV and learn the process of implementation for a variety of settings (traditional and digital) and materials. Examples of student work will also be shown.

SPEAKERS:
Jeff Thomas (University of Southern Indiana: Evansville, IN), Simone Nance (University of Southern Indiana: Evansville, IN)

Literacy Strategies: Supporting All Students in Sensemaking with Text in Anchored Science by Mi-STAR Units

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Literacy Strategies Handout
Literacy Strategies Slides

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Mi-STAR, now also known outside of Michigan as Anchored Science, is a program at Michigan Technological University dedicated to quality NGSS-aligned curriculum since 2015. We listen carefully to teachers and respond with support. Consistently we’ve heard teachers request materials that will help them promote literacy in their science classrooms. In response, we’ve worked with West Ed's Reading Apprenticeship specialists and classroom teachers to develop both integrated instructional practices and optional reading support materials. Our literacy activities are designed with strategies to promote metacognition and model the text interactions of skilled readers for students of all reading levels. We’d like to share our journey, and also share some examples and templates for teachers to use in their own classrooms. Come see how this approach can promote literacy and equity in science.

TAKEAWAYS:
A selection of Anchored Science by Mi-STAR examples and templates for scaffolded literacy supports will be provided. Use them with your own texts in your classroom next week!

SPEAKERS:
Jenne VandePanne (Michigan Technological University/Newaygo Public Schools: Newaygo, MI), Chris Geerer (Mi-STAR: , MI)

Daily Science Instruction IS Possible Using the Workshop Model

Friday, October 27 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2104 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

No one disputes the need for effective daily science instructions for elementary children, yet, only 20% of K-3 students and 35% of grades 4-6 students have access to daily science instruction, according to Cafarell, et.al. (2017). Elementary teachers are challenged to get in daily meaningful science instruction. There is a need to design science lessons that are powerful in impacting student learning and economize the curriculum time. The purpose of this session is to explore the “Workshop Model” instructional layout as a means to deliver meaningful science experiences. This model of instruction has a “tried-and-true” history in literacy and mathematics. The instructional model segments the time into 3 areas: opening, work session, and closing. The session will use a lesson on Earth’s Systems where students open the unit by observing a phenomenon, then move into stations or work sessions, and use student lead closing so students can formalize their understanding of the phenomenon.

TAKEAWAYS:
The workshop model isn’t just for math and literacy—elementary teachers can use this instructional approach to fit effective, engaging, hands-on science lessons into their daily instructional routine.

SPEAKERS:
Kelly Bodner (Cobb County Schools & GSTA Board of Directors)

Hooked on Earthworms: High-Interest Activities to Drive Sensemaking

Friday, October 27 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

First, participants will learn how to keep a worm safe and comfortable for handling. Then we will examine external structure, function, senses, and talk about how those connect to a worm's life style. We will even use flashlights to peek inside the worm to see their digestive system. Each activity will be tied to elementary NGSS on organisms, systems, environment, structure and function, and life cycles. The activities will come from my picture book, This is a Book to Read with a Worm (winner of the AAAS/Subaru Excellence in Science Books, 2020), but I will not promote the book. I just want to share the activities.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will experience a series of activities that will help them use earthworms as phenomena in elementary science. For each activity, we will discuss how to move from the specifics of worms into sensemaking on more general concepts that the worms illustrate.

SPEAKERS:
Jodi Wheeler-Toppen (Author/ Staff Development: Atlanta, GA)

Do NOT Sit Down and Be Quiet

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2202



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Do NOT Sit Down and Be Quiet!

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Participants will be engaged in multiple strategies that include mandatory engagement and collaboration. Many of the activities also include movement. The strategies can be implemented the week they return in any classroom with any subject area. Activities range from a Tea Party (science/literacy) activity, card sorts, and data collecting.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will leave with a variety of strategies to engage students through collaboration and movement.

SPEAKERS:
Carol Moore (STEM West: CLAREMONT, NC)

Experiencing Science by Using Scientific Theater

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Colonial Ballroom



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
AP Biology Theater Evolution Edition.docx
Biology Theater AP Ecology Edition.docx
Biology Theater Cell Signaling Edition.docx
Biology Theater Molecular DNA edition.docx
Chem Theater Example #1.pdf
Chem Theater Example #2.pdf
Chem Theater Example #3.pdf
Chem Theater Example #4.pdf
Chemistry Theater Acids and Bases AP Edition.docx
Chemistry Theater Acids and Bases.docx
Chemistry Theater AP Solutions Edition.docx
Chemistry Theater Bonding.docx
Instructions for Chemistry Theater NSTA.docx

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Scientific Theater might seem like an oxymoron, but over my decade-plus in high school education, it has become a favorite of my students. The goals of this experience are to encourage the attendees/students to be creative in trying to explain sometimes complicated concepts, and to realize that written words and slide presentations are not the only way to explain something. In this workshop, attendees will be given the opportunity to experience Scientific Theater exactly as my students do, by creating their own one-act play explaining a chemical concept. The concept may be one of their own choosing, or there will be several to choose from. After choosing, attendees will split into groups of four, at which point they will collaborate to develop and write a 3-minute play that they best feel illustrates their concept. At the end of the session, volunteer groups will be invited to perform, and it is hoped that the attendees will have seen theater as the powerful and enjoyable tool it is.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will collaborate to create their own plays to describe a scientific concept. After discussion and rehearsal, volunteers will be asked to perform their masterpieces in front of the group. By doing so, attendees will be able to take what they have learned back to their classrooms.

SPEAKERS:
Karen Flummerfelt (Downtown Magnets High School: Los Angeles, CA)

AI or Oh My? A ChatGPT workshop that's not artificial!

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2201


STRAND: Tech Tools

Show Details

The NGSS emphasizes practices including: 1) analyzing/interpreting data, 2) constructing explanations, and 3) obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information. Passive learning will not help middle school students practice these skills. But by giving students agency, ChatGPT, and proper scaffolding, teachers can incorporate such practices. This workshop will support teachers as they navigate through a scaffolded learning experience with ChatGPT. Attendees will discover that ChatGPT can be used to offload lower-level thinking skills and advance students into higher order thinking. For example, MS-PS1-3 reads: Gather and make sense of information to describe that synthetic materials come from natural resources and impact society. Students could use ChatGPT to gather the information and then analyze, evaluate, and construct explanations to make sense of the information. After one hour, attendees will have developed an NGSS-aligned activity using ChatGPT that they can confidently use!

TAKEAWAYS:
To be successful with ChatGPT in the science classroom, we need to give students agency. In this workshop, attendees will control their learning. They will develop a valuable idea for using ChatGPT in their class AND witness a fully different way of managing their class…by giving students agency.

SPEAKERS:
Walter Ryan (Retired Educator), Chris Turner (Chief of Staff: Rockaway, NJ), Denise Bressler (Chief Ideologist: Liberty Corner, NJ)

Let's give them something to talk about!

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2214


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Developing students' "soft skills" has been a post-Covid school focus for us. This workshop will provide teachers will ready to use lessons that promote conversation and collaboration among even the quietest of students. These quick lessons of 1-3 periods can be modified to multiple NGSS content standards. In this workshop teachers will model a biotech debate, Instagram challenge, and a prehistoric Sweet 16 bracket. Most importantly- our students requested to do these lessons again! Check out our biotech debate directions: https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1GFM3Iy2-ITGp-H-H6Q0H93Fdvx7WK2xdAo07kb3QxVU/edit?usp=sharing Check out our biotech debate example: https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1bKjPCD0wkxyQGPlC6cJdokxU4OPy0xvE82K_lygpasg/edit?usp=sharing

TAKEAWAYS:
Bring home three creative lessons that will animate even your quietest students!

SPEAKERS:
Jacqueline Svetich (Science Teacher: Naperville, IL), Adrianne Toomey (Neuqua Valley High School: Naperville, IL)

Visual Storytelling: Comics in the Classroom for Learning and Sharing Your Own Science Stories

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 C


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

I'll share concepts and processes of learning from visual stories and walk teachers through my procedure of asking students to tell visual stories about their own observations, research, experiments, and other STEAM related experiences. Since communication of science concepts is vital, we'll start by doing it ourselves -- using prompts to draw and write, discussing the outcomes of three brief exercises, and anticipating how they could be used with students. My visual (of course!) presentation includes an entertaining and challenging assortment of visual story examples -- as well as an educator-created method for using storytelling on children with literacy issues.

TAKEAWAYS:
Visual storytelling is an exciting, fun, and effective way to communicate. It can -- and should -- join writing and science notebooks in student output -- and may make scientists of them.

SPEAKERS:
Karen Romano Young (Science communicator: Bethel, CT)

Incorporating Wet Labs and Writing to Assess Higher Order Thinking of Chemistry Concepts

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Basie Ballroom C


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

This session will provide two example wet lab assessments and information to design one for the general and college/AP chemistry classroom. Both labs were our summative assessment for our molecular structures unit (topics: polarity, intermolecular forces, Lewis structures) and our measuring matter unit (topics: density, metric units, relationship between mass, volume, and temperature). For the molecular structure unit assessment, students determined the polarity of acetone, water, ethanol, and vegetable oil by testing solubility, evaporation rate, surface tension, and drawing Lewis structures. Students wrote a CER to classify each compound as polar or nonpolar. For our measuring matter lab assessment, students had an unknown metal or liquid and had to calculate density and classify the unknown substance and wrote a short CER. Grading can be traditional or SRG.

TAKEAWAYS:
There are numerous ways to assess besides traditional paper and pencil tests in chemistry. This session will focus on using labs and writing CERs based on lab data as an assessment for concepts.

SPEAKERS:
Kelsey Mescher (Battle High School: Columbia, MO), Stephanie Coyle (Jefferson Middle School: Columbia, MO)

Integrating Culturally Responsive Literacy Instructional Strategies with 3-D Science Teaching in K-3 Learning Spaces

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 B


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

In “Integrating Culturally Responsive Literacy Instructional Strategies with Science Teaching in K-3 Learning Spaces,” new science teachers will explore ways to implement the Three-Dimensional Science Teaching Framework and the tenets of Culturally Responsive Literacy Instruction (CRLI) to build equitable learning experiences for young learners. Participants will identify the tenets of the 3-D Science Framework and CRLI. Next, participants will explore the integration of literacy skills and science concepts. Finally, participants will create a lesson that incorporates the 3-D Science Framework and CRLI practices using K-3 learning objectives. This interactive workshop is designed to support participants in providing opportunities for learners to apply literacy skills while learning science concepts that relate to real world experiences.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will provide opportunities for young learners to apply literacy skills while learning science concepts that relate to real-world experiences.

SPEAKERS:
Cletis Allen (CLETIS Education Consulting LLC: No City, No State)

Farm Phenomena in the Science Classroom: What happens when Old MacDonald and Einstein meet?

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2201


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

In this workshop participants will explore their local agricultural commodities to determine which ones are a good fit with their grade level science standards. A year-long Farm-To-Plate unit will be shared, and participants will be active learners as they explore: • Crops (corn, wheat, sunflowers, sorghum): plant parts & needs, human and animal uses, baby vs adult, seed investigations, life cycle, and environmental concerns • Animals: human uses, life cycle, baby vs adult, needs, environmental concerns, characteristics • Technology: drones, ear tags, feeding/milking stalls, Tower Gardens, equipment • Agricultural Careers • Environment: bees, soil health • Nutrition: Farm-To-Plate process, fresh vs frozen, local Participants will play games, make projects, engage in partner work and group discussions, and explore these topics and their relationship with NGSS. When agricultural literacy and science standards are combined, students have a meaningful way to learn about their world.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will walk away with learning ideas that use agricultural phenomena and the Farm-to-Plate process to teach life and earth science standards to young learners. Participants will engage in games and projects that combine agricultural literacy and NGSS in a fun and meaningful way!

SPEAKERS:
Nancy Smith (Heatherstone Elementary School: Olathe, KS)

Investigating Stellar Evolution – From Star Formation Regions to Catastrophic Destruction – using NASA Image Sets

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Jay McShann B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
https://chandra.si.edu/
https://chandra.si.edu/edu/
https://chandra.si.edu/edu/
https://universe-of-learning.org/home
Presentation Slide Set
SE RESOURCES Kansas City.pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Stars form in giant molecular clouds of gas and dust in massive star formation complexes, and depending on their initial mass, usually follow a sequence that ends in their destruction in catastrophic collapses and explosions. The process of stellar evolution provides the energy which drives the universe, and thereby determines its future. During the last stages of evolution, nucleosynthesis creates the elements which will enrich the next generation of protostars and planets. formation of stars also sets the stage for possible exoplanets forming within the debris disks of young protostars as hydrogen begins to fuse in their cores. This basic sequencing activity is one of a series of activities designed to show how scientists view, study, and examine the process of stellar evolution. The card sets have descriptions and links and can be used as a pretest or a posttest, either individually or as a group. Multiple answers are acceptable. A scoring rubric is included.

TAKEAWAYS:
Stellar evolution is a cosmic cycle from the formation of protostars and stars in cold molecular clouds, through their final collapses into remnants and stellar cores. This process creates heavier elements and sets the stage for the formation of exoplanets and the next generation of star formation.

SPEAKERS:
Donna Young (NASA/NSO/UoL Program Manager: Laughlin, NV)

Content Integration in K-5 classrooms — Lessons from the field

Saturday, October 28 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2102 A


STRAND: Leadership and Advocacy

Show Details

In this session we will discuss the strategies, approaches and the findings from an 18-month statewide project for systems-level change for content integration anchored in science. This project was created by the Washington Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction in collaboration with The Lawrence Hall of Science. Participants will engage in hands-on experiences, discussions, and presentations to learn about essential features for mutually supportive content integration and to reflect on and share their own efforts to advance content integration in their contexts. They will explore and take away the tools and strategies used in the project with teachers and instructional leaders and will have opportunities to share the conditions of their own contexts, reflect on how the strategies employed in this model may apply in their own systems, and identify entry points for beginning and/or advancing implementation.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers and leaders will gain insight into the principles and definitions of content integration with science as the anchor and explore tools, strategies, and system-wide approaches they can use in their own context in order to identify their next step towards content integration.

SPEAKERS:
Sarah Pedemonte (The Lawrence Hall of Science: Berkeley, CA), Rebecca Abbott (The Lawrence Hall of Science: Berkeley, CA)

Carpe Diem et Tempus: Finding Time to Teach Science Daily Through Integrating ELA Strategies

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2102 A


STRAND: Research to Practice

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Elementary teachers continue to struggle with “fitting it all in” when ELA standards are prioritized at the elementary level. While cross-curricular instruction is one strategy, there is often still a need to focus on the identified ELA competencies. This session will focus on strategies that easily cross over between science and ELA in order to better leverage instructional time. For example, a common strategy called “text to” helps students make connections as they read and make meaning from ideas in the text. By expanding this strategy with science content and investigations, students now add first-hand knowledge of a topic to their connection-making mental process. This strategy incorporates discourse strategies that are known to assist students in sensemaking. Research within the ELA side has supported the idea that the most logical place for instruction around reading and thinking strategies is within the content areas. Additional strategies will be shared and modeled.

TAKEAWAYS:
The session will focus on engaging participants in strategies that can easily cross over and place science at the forefront, and provide authentic topics around which to build both science concepts and ELA competencies, thus seizing the time to do science.

SPEAKERS:
Christine Anne Royce (Shippensburg University: Shippensburg, PA)

Implementing ELL Strategies in Science

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2208


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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During this presentation topics such as creating language objectives, color-coding vocabulary, using graphic organizers to help further comprehension of content, and using the expert readers strategy will be covered.

TAKEAWAYS:
Various strategies for scientific literacy that are easily applicable to any science classroom such as using language objectives, graphic organizers, and color-coding key vocabulary.

SPEAKERS:
Mikayla Kagey (Central Kitsap Middle School: Silverdale, WA), Sydnie Chouery (Science Teacher: Silverdale, WA)

Supporting English Language Learners in the Science Classroom

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2210


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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I would like to introduce and allow teachers to interact with strategies that I have used while teaching at a school that consists of at least 70% English Language Learners (ELLs). I have worked to compile strategies that support students' language development in all four language domains and in all science content areas. For developing reading, I have used stations with multiple means of representation, as well as interactive visual vocabulary activities to frontload vocabulary prior to reading a science text. For listening, I have used videos with pause points for comprehension checks, as well as note-taking while listening, to practice active listening. For writing, I have used sentence frames, single point rubrics, and visual vocabulary word banks to support student writing. For speaking, I have used questioning strategies, as well as organized systems, for student participation. These strategies have positively impacted language and content acquisition in my classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
Strategies and supports that can be easily implemented in your classroom tomorrow no matter the lesson, content, or activity.

SPEAKERS:
Celeste Pistole (Guadalupe Centers Middle School: Kansas City, MO)

Go Hybrid! Bridge digital and analog teaching and learning to improve student engagment and learning

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2504 A


STRAND: Tech Tools

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Since returning from COVID classrooms have become increasingly digitally based, but has this been beneficial for students? After reflecting on our own teaching practices & examining our students’ progress we concluded that a fully digital classroom is limiting our students' linguistic and academic growth which can really hurt our English Learners. We examined available research on technology use in the class & how the implementation had impacted students. In addition, we looked at current best practices for literacy & academic language acquisition as it pertains to our ELLs. We began to look for ways to hybridize assignments to encourage substantive conversations, collaboration & engagement. Early results point to students’ better use of academic language, higher engagement & increased test scores. Participants will learn by doing a hybrid assignment & compare them to the results of our digital only & analog only assignments. We will provide scaffolds to build your own hybrid lessons.

TAKEAWAYS:
Particpants will walk away with outlines and skeletons on builidng hybridized digital and analog lessons.

SPEAKERS:
Heather Berlin (Truman High School: Independence, MO), Jennifer Tuff (North Side High School: Fort Worth, TX)

Bridging Redox to ALL learners: Making Sense of Voltaic Cells with ELL in Mind

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 G



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA KC Bridging REDOX to ALL Learners with ELL in Mind

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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The impact of battery operated cars have become a hot topic as energy alternatives are explored. Unfortunately, few students get exposed to the true nature of a Voltaic Cell and the vital workings of the transfer of chemical energy to electrical energy through oxidation-reduction reactions. After a junior high demo, Physical Science and Chemistry classes don't relate the function of metals in their tug-of-war with electrons within a Redox reaction. Working with an ELL Specialist, Science Specialists created a series of lessons that incorporate phenomenon, asking questions, creating an investigation, data analysis, justification of their data through science research and application to real world analogous phenomenon. These have been tried in Arkansas Physical Science and Chemistry classrooms. To improve the efficiency and effectiveness of batteries, the next generation must engage on the issue. The answers may come from the next William Kamkwamba not the AP Chem class.

TAKEAWAYS:
When life gives you lemons- make a battery! Educators will see an inclusive approach incorporating a demo to explore how a battery operates. It will relate the simple to the complex Redox reaction with supports and scaffolded instruction to best meet the needs of all learners.

SPEAKERS:
Susan Allison (Dawson Education Service Cooperative: Arkadelphia, AR)

Make Your Graph Tell Your Story

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 F


STRAND: Tech Tools

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Students often have ok data but present it graphically not in the best way. Let’s talk about how to make your graph tell your story. Simple stuff like: which type of graph? What variable, where does it go, scale, function or not? Stuff beyond the basics: Which graph is the best type of graph for your data, hypothesis and story? How can I effectively improve my graph to better communicate my results? Does my graph limit the credibility of my work?

TAKEAWAYS:
Effective graphing can be a tool to visually show relationships.

SPEAKERS:
Louise Chapman (Volusia County Schools: Deland, FL), Jacklyn Bonneau (Massachusetts Academy of Math & Science at WPI: Worcester, MA)

Empowering the Artemis Generation: Promoting Equity Through STEM Role Models and Culturally Responsive Strategies

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA Oct 2023_Empower the Artemis Generation.pptx
Presentation and Links

STRAND: STEM Haven

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The Artemis Generation is the next generation of explorers who will push the boundaries of human knowledge and endeavor. To empower this generation, we need to expose them to STEM role models who represent diverse backgrounds and experiences. This exposure can help to broaden students' perspectives and show them that STEM is a field for everyone. Additionally, culturally responsive teaching strategies can help to create an inclusive learning environment for all students. This session will explore the importance of empowering students through equity and inclusion with the help of NASA resources on STEM role models, the First Woman graphic novel, and a STEM identity development activity. By the end of this session, participants will be able to: • Identify the importance of equity and inclusion in STEM education • Develop strategies for identifying and promoting diverse STEM role models • Apply culturally responsive teaching strategies in their classrooms

TAKEAWAYS:
Diverse STEM role models and culturally responsive teaching help all students succeed in STEM. By exposing students to diverse role models in STEM and using culturally responsive teaching strategies, educators create inclusive learning environments where all students can thrive.

SPEAKERS:
Monica Uribe (NASA Education Specialist), Dr. Sagirah Wheeler (NASA Education Specialist: No City, No State)

Once Upon an Earth Science Book: Real Science, Real Literacy Instruction

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 C


Show Details

The session will open with having participants work through pieces of Chapter 11 from Once Upon an Earth Science Book. Participants (as students) will collect information from three models: (the Coriolis effect, major ocean currents, and how wind creates currents). Then they will read an article on the Pacific Garbage Patch and how its existence was predicted based on such models before it was discovered. We will outline a writing assignment in which they predict where a boatload of rubber duckies that capsized off the coast of Morocco might end up. Next, we will discuss the "shape" of the lesson we just worked through, called a literacy learning cycle. From there, we will look at several specific difficulties that arise for students when they are asked to read and write (expectations, background knowledge, and meaningful writing). Finally, we will talk briefly about how the Once Upon a Science Book series can serve as a resource for literacy learning cycles.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will be introduced to the literacy learning cycle format, in which hands-on work precedes meaningful reading and writing activities. You will see how this system works by participating in a lesson and come away with practical strategies for your classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Jodi Wheeler-Toppen (Author/ Staff Development: Atlanta, GA)

Computational Thinking Guided by Artificial Intelligence

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2204



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Platform to create with guidance from AI
Video demo of the platform
Learn to create and think like a computer scientist, guided with real-time feedback from artificial intelligence.

STRAND: Tech Tools

Show Details

Although most people do not know a programming language, nearly everyone can read and write. The exposition of plain English text forms a critical part of logically explaining a set of operations and instructions, which are foundational to computational thinking and coding. The learning of programming concepts, such as cause-and-effect, abstraction, logical reasoning, etc., will be explored through each example exercise during the session. We will write a number of games together, guided by artificial intelligence, where each can be completed in just 10 minutes or less! The platform will automatically convert the text into a playable game. Games are engaging learning tools and are perfect for teaching many subject areas. The session will be divided as follows: 1. How to describe a game in English via Setting and Plot. 2. Basic game construct. 3. Pong-like games. 4. Space Invaders. 5. Mario-like games. 6. More complex variables/attributes. 7. Debugging. 8. Sharing games. 9. How to use Online Tutorials.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn to: clearly articulate programming concepts, think like a programmer, relate various aspects of each sentence to computational concepts and constructs, apply lessons to various subjects.

SPEAKERS:
Michael Hsiao (Virginia Tech: Blacksburg, VA)

Puzzled About Non-Fiction? Using Templates to Break-Down Nonfiction Articles.

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2208



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Google Drive folder of resources
Presentation Link

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The materials presented were created by two 8th grade life science teachers. Our students struggle with reading and analyzing nonfiction text. Nonfiction text is an important part of science literacy, and teaching our students how to interact with the text and pull important information is essential. The templates we created can be applied to almost any article or reading that teachers will use in their classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will go away from this session with materials that they can use immediately in their classroom. These materials will help students to read and organize nonfiction texts and use them in discussions with classmates.

SPEAKERS:
Erin Branstetter (Bolivar Middle School: Bolivar, MO)

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