2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

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Rooms and times subject to change.
6 results
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Quick Activities to Increase Data & Graph Literacy (Grades 3-10)

Saturday, October 28 • 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Share-a-thon Area


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Data is key to NGSS, yet many students struggle to make sense of it. Many of us are confused about how to help our students (especially post-pandemic learning) build and strengthen these skills. These classroom-ready, quick activities are based on what research says about how students learn from data! Come discuss strategies and access ready-to-use activities to integrate these skills into whatever your curriculum or platform is, as Do Nows and Exit Tickets. These strategies both foster science sensemaking for all students and increase students' interest in working with data (from Pre-K to 8th). Let’s set ourselves and our students up for success by building strong foundations... without having to reinvent the wheel ourselves or take away lots of time from the rest of our instruction!

TAKEAWAYS:
Access ready-to-use activities to build your students' data and graph skills, without taking a lot of time from the rest of your curriculum.

SPEAKERS:
Kristin Hunter-Thomson (Dataspire Education & Evaluation, LLC: No City, No State)

Using Booklets to Connect ELA and Science

Saturday, October 28 • 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Share-a-thon Area


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Primary grades (K-2) are a challenge for science education. With the focus on basic literacy and math, there is little time for stand-alone science lessons. Here is one solution. Printable booklets are widely used to teach sight words (the top commonly used 100 words) or how to decode simple letter-sound relationships. With a careful selection of vocabulary words, they can also be used to introduce science ideas. The 6-part lesson 1) practices noticing and vocabulary; 2) uses the booklet to get students to notice, wonder, and ask questions; 3) plans an investigation; 4) carries out an investigation; 5) makes sense of results, and 6) shares results with others. The approach is illustrated with two booklets and lessons. One is on different kinds of leaves (NGSS K-LS1-1) and one is on the effect of sunlight (NGSS K-PS3-1), which can tie into building a structure to reduce the warming effect of sunlight (NGSS K-PS3-2).

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn how to create or recognize science literature that clicks with a teacher focused on reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Use that literature to craft a lesson that explicitly connects teaching ELA to student ideas, science ideas, science practices, and sensemaking.

SPEAKERS:
Jan Weaver (Retired)

Incorporating Appendix H Into Lessons to Build Skills in the Nature of Science

Saturday, October 28 • 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Share-a-thon Area


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We’re all passionate about science, and part of that passion stems from the fact that no other discipline is exploring the entire physical universe and making sense of our world. No other discipline can make predictions as accurately as science can! It’s so powerful and engaging that some misunderstand it and use it for purposes it isn't intended to be used for. Some even manipulate our students’ misunderstandings of science, creating enough confusion that our students believe in junk science, disinformation, or even deny science! As science educators, we sometimes get distracted by all the minutia on our plates and do not directly incorporate the NGSS Appendix H: Understanding the Scientific Enterprise in our work. Students find joy in “debunking” bad science and become future citizens who can sniff out scientific misinformation. We'll enhance activities with the scientific thinking that is developed from a deeper understanding of the nature of science.

TAKEAWAYS:
Get a chance to share your questions about how to help students think like scientists, instead of letting their misconceptions lead the way in how they view the world. Bring your stories. Build a response to logical fallacies. Gain insight into Appendix H of the NGSS.

SPEAKERS:
Ericca Thornhill (Mizzou Academy: Columbia, MO)

Integrating Culturally Responsive Literacy Instructional Strategies with 3-D Science Teaching in K-3 Learning Spaces

Saturday, October 28 • 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Share-a-thon Area


STRAND: STEM Haven | STEAM

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In this interactive workshop, new science teachers will explore ways to implement the 3-D Science Teaching Framework and the tenets of Culturally Responsive Literacy Instruction (CRLI) to build equitable learning experiences in literacy and science for young learners.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will provide opportunities for young learners to apply literacy skills while learning science concepts that relate to real-world experiences.

SPEAKERS:
Cletis Allen (CLETIS Education Consulting LLC: No City, No State)

Elementary STEM Unit: Lessons and Insights

Saturday, October 28 • 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Share-a-thon Area



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
STEM Share-a-thon Poster

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Explore an innovative K-2 STEM unit by Elaine Makarevich. Discover engaging lessons and resources tailored for young learners. Gain insights from the teacher/author on the creation and development process.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will gain access to STEM lessons and resources, and hear from the teacher/author who wrote the lessons on how she developed them.

SPEAKERS:
Elaine Makarevich (SubjectToClimate: No City, No State)

Engaging Middle School Students in Blackout Poetry

Saturday, October 28 • 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Share-a-thon Area


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To some students, poetry may seem daunting. But if we look at poetry as writing in short lines and lists of words, it becomes less scary. In our science classrooms, students may also find that some concepts are difficult. But what happens if we give students opportunities to play with ideas and rehearse those ideas in short lines and lists, or poems, that they create? In our Linking Science, Mathematics, and Literacy for All Learners program, teachers have developed integrated literacy lessons to help students learn scientific content. As students write to learn, they are also learning vocabulary and approaches to help them read and understand complex science texts. One of these strategies is black-out poetry in which the writer is blacking out, or eclipsing, words on the page to create something new. In this session we will share how blackout poetry can be used in different ways with a variety of texts so that all learners can blend their science learning and poetry writing. We wil

TAKEAWAYS:
In this activity, students read and comprehend a scientific text, and then determine the key terms and domain-specific vocabulary. They use this information to create a poem, as well as a visual representation of the text. This is appropriate for upper-elementary through high school students.

SPEAKERS:
Amy Lannin (University of Missouri: Columbia, MO)

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