2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

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Rooms and times subject to change.
12 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

“AUTHOR” Activating Students' Ideas! Linking Formative Assessment to Instructional Sequence

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 C


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Activating Students' Ideas! is a one-stop professional learning experience that will inspire you to reimagine how you teach. This session discusses how two popular teaching resources can be used in tandem: (1) Uncovering Student Ideas formative assessment probes and (2) Explore-before-explain teaching. We show how simple shifts in arranging and combining activities help students construct knowledge while allowing you to put the three dimensions of the K-12 Science Education Frameworks into practice. The session includes: (1) A concise review of research on why the order in which you structure your lessons is so critical; (2) The critical planning considerations for becoming an “explore-before-explain” teacher; (3) Ready-to-teach lessons that use science phenomena as a hook to provide an interdisciplinary learning experience; and (4) Reflection questions will spark thinking throughout the sequencing process and help you develop the knowledge to adapt these concepts to you

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn about a resource for formative assessment and explore-before-explain teaching.

SPEAKERS:
Patrick Brown (Fort Zumwalt School District R-II: O'Fallon, MO)

Rockets and Chickens!

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2209


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

“Rockets Away '' curriculum revealed that the predominantly female staff was uneasy and hesitant to use launching equipment. A “Science Squad” assisted the teachers with the physics knowledge, building, and launching of the rockets. Then the creation of videos to show the proper techniques for rocketry and voice overlay ppt to ensure the accuracy of the physics concepts. Teachers became certified in Rocketry. Many 3rd-grade teachers provided inquiry science in the form of dioramas for their life science unit. The introduction of “Chickquest” was essential to providing inquiry-based learning. Early on, a “Science Squad” dressed in white coats, funny chick glasses, and hats assisted the teachers in the classroom with setting-up incubators, candling eggs, and troubleshooting student questions to WebCams for students to witness the live hatching 24/7. These STEM activities evolved into humanity lessons such as students reading to the chicks and sharing their hatches with each other.

TAKEAWAYS:
How to leverage technology & personnel for elementary teachers to engage students in authentic science and engineering concepts.

SPEAKERS:
Johnna O'Neal (Instructional Specialist: No City, No State), Katrina Halasa (Akron Public Schools: Akron, OH)

Making Physics Engaging & Accessible for All Students (even those who struggle with math)

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Jay McShann B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

My first years of teaching Physics at Title 1 schools in Memphis were challenging. Many of my students were very behind, especially in math. However, I developed 5 strategies to make learning physics accessible and they completely transformed my classroom. 1. “Building Block” Method The biggest breakthrough in my classroom was breaking long problems down into building blocks. I will show how to do this with a sample forces unit. 2. Pre-manipulated equations I will share an equation sheet that shows all forms of each equation. It is a game-changer for students who struggle with algebra. 3. Setting-Up for Success I will model a consistent way to help students stay organized on different types of problems. 4. Simplifying Motion I will illustrate how to solve motion problems using simpler notation and simpler equations. 5. Simplifying Circuits I will show how to use the “routes method” so students can solve most circuits in a more conceptual way.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will come away from this session with strategies that they can immediately implement in their classrooms to make physics more accessible and engaging, especially for their lower-level learners.

SPEAKERS:
Jack Replinger (FormerTeacher / Founder: , WA)

Zipping to STEM

Friday, October 27 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2204


STRAND: Tech Tools

Show Details

We outline an integrated STEM program implemented across multiple schools in a large urban district. The program presented an engineering design challenge using computer-aided design, computational modeling, and 3D printing, as a way to fully integrate the “T” in STEM. We engaged students in solving a real-world problem: optimizing a prototype of a Soap Box Derby Car by using CAD software, virtual and physical wind tunnel testing, and 3D printing. Students investigated the factors that impact the performance of a gravity racing car in order to optimize its performance, using concepts they learned about aerodynamic forces. The students then used CAD Software and virtual simulation testing to design and test a car shell. We will share integration strategies, highlights of the curriculum implementation in several middle school classrooms, and research results from student assessment and teacher interviews to discuss the impact of the curriculum on students’ learning and engagement.

TAKEAWAYS:
How to effectively integrate technology, engineering, and science in a STEM curriculum that focuses on engineering-specific technology tools and computational modeling, and uses science and engineering practices.

SPEAKERS:
Johnna O'Neal (Instructional Specialist: No City, No State), Katrina Halasa (Akron Public Schools: Akron, OH)

CONSTRUCTing Effective Assessment Questions Using the NGSS DCIs

Friday, October 27 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2205



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA-KC 2023, CONSTRUCT presentation, NSTA upload.pptx

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Using the Disciplinary Core Ideas and a research-based “citizen science” approach, science educators contributed their own test items, and also helped to revise existing test items in order to address crucial issues such as difficulty, gender, and racial/ethnic bias that were present in the item analysis characteristics. We share the analysis and results of these efforts so that educators can assess their own test items to be more inclusive of all students understandings in one of the dimensions of the 3-D approach to learning. Learn what changes contributed to improvement of the item as well as what types of changes or revisions made the item worse than before. We also share results of field testing of these items in student classrooms and discuss the importance of incorporating students’ misconceptions into the response choices to capture their true understanding of science concepts as outlined in the DCIs.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn to evaluate assessment questions that you use to assess students’ sensemaking of elements outlined in the NGSS DCIs. Are the questions free of bias, not too difficult, indicative of overall student performance? Do they include common misconceptions that students hold? Access a free resource.

SPEAKERS:
Cynthia Crockett (Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian: Cambridge, MA)

Toward Equitable Science Teaching and Learning: Language Shifts in the NGSS Classroom

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2102 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Handout (Language Shifts)
Session Slides (Language Shifts).pptx.pdf

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

A collaborative team of teachers and researchers share findings from a research project aimed at integrating science and language with fifth-grade multilingual learners (MLs). First, we describe three language instructional shifts: modalities, registers, and interactions. Then, we share how two teachers enacted these shifts over the course of a physical science unit and present classroom examples of how they (a) used nonlinguistic modalities (e.g., models) as an essential way to engage all students in the Science and Engineering Practices, (b) treated specialized language (i.e., a more formal register) as a product of learning science rather than a prerequisite, and (c) leveraged the affordances of different registers (i.e., everyday, specialized) based on the different communicative demands across different types of interactions. Finally, we provide suggestions for enacting these language instructional shifts with MLs across a range of classroom contexts.

TAKEAWAYS:
As all students, and especially multilingual learners, make sense of phenomena and problems, they use multiple modalities (both linguistic and visual) and a range of registers (from everyday to specialized) across different types of interactions to engage in communication of science ideas.

SPEAKERS:
Iovanna Williams (Science Teacher: , NY), Adriana Romanzo (Elementary Science Teacher: New York, NY), Abigail Schwenger (Research Associate)

NMLSTA-Don’t Cross the Streams; Assessment Literacy in the Inquiry-Based Classroom

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 B


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Based on the work of Andrew Ho and Margaret Heritage, this session will outline the four major “quadrants” of the assessment matrix and review the nature and the stakeholders for each. We focus then on the process of moving from a structured Formative Assessment Process to an Invisible Formative Assessment Process, and benchmarks for delivering high-quality assessment alongside high-quality instruction.

Lastly, we will focus on the NGSS specific requirements for classroom-based assessment and align it to the Herron scale of inquiry to ensure that our assessment process is inclined in the same direction as our instruction.

TAKEAWAYS:
Implementation of inquiry-based standards and the shift to a more inquiry-based classroom requires a clear vision of the assessment opportunities and processes classroom teachers will need to engage in and administrators will need to support and review.

SPEAKERS:
John White (Breakthrough Technologies: , IL)

Dark matter and the fourth form of circular motion

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Bennie Moten


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

A lab done in science classes leads students to discover that the force of a hanging mass can be offset by the force of a spinning mass, finding equilibrium between centrifugal force and gravity. Discover how that same physics principle used in astronomy applies to the rotation of the Milky Way and led to the discovery of Dark Matter. Students will compare their calculations for circular and planetary motion with those for the rotation of the galaxy as collected by radio astronomer’s plotting the movement of neutral hydrogen. How will your students react when they discover these calculations don’t match? Learn how to lead your students through a discussion of the world of radio astronomers who grappled with the same problem when their data did not align with the laws of physics. The explanation became a new field in cosmology – the study of dark matter and dark energy.

TAKEAWAYS:
Students will learn that galactic rotational motion follows different rules than either circular motion or Kepler’s planetary motion laws. This led to the discovery of dark matter.

SPEAKERS:
John Clark (Volusia Online Learning: Port Orange, FL)

Crafting Three-Dimensional Multiple Choice Questions & More

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Mary Lou Williams



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Presentation
Revision History of Written Assessment

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

I will take participants through my process of crafting sets of formative multiple choice questions that each use 2 of the 3 dimensions of NGSS, so that all dimensions are addressed. I will also show my process for refining free response questions to get the exact responses I am looking for and that allow for an ease of grading and seeing students’ understanding. I will provide examples from my own classroom & direct them to where they can find more examples from various storylines. As an iHub Chemistry writer, I learned to write 3-D multiple choice formative questions. An assessment graduate course taught me how to write quality distractors to see limits of student understanding and get useful feedback data. I merge these 2 in my own classroom to create assessments to get to what my students know. I will share my learning from these trainings and more to set teachers on the path to quality 3-D classroom assessments.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn to craft three-dimensional assessments, multiple choice, and free response. Using quality distractors in multiple choice formatives allows you to pinpoint student misconceptions. Free response questions direct students to the specific response you want so that grading goes quicker.

SPEAKERS:
Sarah Evans (Olathe South High School: Olathe, KS)

“How to Cook a Turkey”: Students’ Misconceptions in Science, What We Assume vs. What They Think

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA-KC, Oct. 2023, How to Cook a Turkey”, Students' MIsconceptions..... upload.pptx

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Our students make sense of science and construct their ideas from many experiences, then use that “knowledge” as a foundation for their learning. However, it may not always be a solid foundation. We can help students develop their science knowledge through a deeper understanding of the misconceptions they hold, using phenomena, observation, sensemaking, and robust assessment. We can then assess students’ ideas and misconceptions in the sciences at various grade levels creating and using research-based assessments, understanding the importance of including their ideas in those assessments. When each item contains a choice between a scientifically correct answer and a common, widely-held, student misconception, we can more accurately evaluate our students’ true understanding of the DCI components of the NGSS.

TAKEAWAYS:
Educators will learn how to work with misconceptions that students hold in order to incorporate those into useful assessments. Use students’ sensemaking to discover ways to get at those ideas, and share your students’ misconceptions, hear others as well, and build research-based assessments.

SPEAKERS:
Cynthia Crockett (Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian: Cambridge, MA)

Implementing Differentiation Strategies in High School Classrooms

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Truman B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Implementing Differentiation Slides

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Differentiation in the science classroom is essential for student learning, allowing students to enter the lesson from different points and gain the tools to access material and ensure enduring understanding. In this session, participants will learn about a variety of strategies they can use in their classroom to engage students, identify misconceptions, provide varied practice activities, and offer choices in the learning progression. Differentiation seems to be a wide umbrella, but this session aims to narrow the focus and provide teachers with tools and tips they can implement as soon as they’re home from NSTA!

TAKEAWAYS:
Takeaway a deeper understanding of approaches to differentiation, including both small- and large-scale strategies that are applicable to all science classrooms. Strategies range from simple techniques that can be implemented during a portion of one class, to unit-long approaches.

SPEAKERS:
Kellie Dean (Adlai E. Stevenson High School: Lincolnshire, IL), Jin Kyung Hwang (Adlai E. Stevenson High School: Lincolnshire, IL), Molly Sponseller (Adlai E. Stevenson High School: Lincolnshire, IL)

High Altitude Ballooning to Engage All Students

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 1501 A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
205702main_Bag_Ballons.pdf
Activity to demonstrated bouyancy
balloon_program_fact_sheet_4 (1).pdf
balloon_science_science scope.pdf
Article on Balloon Science from Science Scope
buildasatellite_worksheet.pdf
Activity to aid in planning
Copy of tst1501_29 (1).pdf
Near Space Science - TST Article from Jan 15
HAB at HHS sample files.pdf
sample documents
HAB Training Videos (1).docx
Training Videos
jcst1402_26.pdf
Journal of College Science Teaching article on ballooning.]
NASA BEST Engineering Framework (1).pptx
A help for teaching engineering design
NASA_20230208_Workshop_scientific_balloons (1).pptx
An introductory Powerpoint on HAB
tst0801_37.pdf
Student's at the Edge of Space from TST

STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

The presentation will cover the basics of high-altitude ballooning as done at Fort Hays State University. Attendees will be introduced to the FHSU website that we use with school groups who contact us to help with their launch. These cover physics and chemistry involved in launching a balloon, the FAA rules, where to find materials, tracking and recovery systems, designing an experiment, and processing data. We will also introduce the teachers to the technology that can be flown to collect data which includes cameras, data loggers, and how to make and code data collection devices with Arduinos. The presentation will include information about NASA resources on high altitude ballooning. We will also share the high school curriculum developed by Shepherd-Adams that she uses in her classroom for an aeronautics CTE course. Examples of student projects and presentations will be presented. The project aligns with NGSS standards related to engineering, earth and space science, as well as physi

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn how to prepare and launch a high-altitude balloon that integrates science and engineering.

SPEAKERS:
Cheryl Shepherd-Adams (Teacher: Hays, KS), Paul Adams (Fort Hays State University: Hays, KS)

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