2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

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Rooms and times subject to change.
9 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Shining a Light on the “T” in STEM-- Engaging Elementary Students in Computational Thinking Using Activities About Light.

Saturday, October 28 • 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Share-a-thon Area


STRAND: STEM Haven | Computer Science

Show Details

Even though children interact with the natural and designed worlds daily, they don’t often think and act like scientists and engineers-- who often use computational thinking. Come see how to embed computational thinking into an elementary lesson on light!

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn how to incorporate computational thinking into science lessons!

SPEAKERS:
Jesse Wilcox (University of Northern Iowa: Cedar Falls, IA)

Using Checklists For Assessment

Saturday, October 28 • 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Share-a-thon Area



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
2023 Checklists for Assessment NSTA.pptx

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As teachers are required to assess a student’s understanding of competencies in addition to knowledge outcomes, they have used tools more commonly used in other disciplines. For example, rubrics have been a tool used to assess many forms of student work. Their general description of each achievement level provides flexibility and personalization. This is particularly useful for essay assignments. However, in lab reports, this often leads to ambiguity. Students may not know the difference between an “acceptable” demonstration of communication compared to a “skilled” demonstration. Despite repeated instruction, the generalized description of rubrics allows room for conflict and negotiation between students and teachers. Rubrics can be redesigned into checklists to remove the ambiguity. It is clear whether or not students have demonstrated each aspect of a competency. This session will share a few of these checklists for teachers to use in their own classrooms.

TAKEAWAYS:
Checklists can be made from rubrics. Checklists are more clear and reduce ambiguity.

SPEAKERS:
Leon Lau (Teacher: , AB)

Extreme Living: Making Sense of Changing Weather Patterns and Designing Solutions

Saturday, October 28 • 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Share-a-thon Area


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This presentation will provide teachers with a ready-to-teach Unit designed to help their students experience several Physical Science, Earth-Space Science, and Engineering NGSS standards. The unit addresses global weather patterns and the impacts of potential pattern changes. It also addresses thermal energy and its applications in building design. All middle school science teachers; whether new to profession, new to phenomena based learning, or seasoned veterans will find something new and exciting to bring back to their classrooms. This Unit combines my understanding of the middle school science classroom with expertise of curriculum writers at Pacific Education Institute. Teachers will receive help planning lessons, activities, and discussions. They will also take the role of a student to have first hand experience with labs and activities. Teachers will receive a digital copy of all of the instructional materials including grading rubrics.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will learn how to teach and assess a dynamic 3-D unit addressing Physical Science and Earth Space Science NGSS Standards. Teachers will leave with editable access to all Unit materials. Teachers will get time and guidance on how to adapt the Unit to their classroom and student needs.

SPEAKERS:
Kat Chamberlain (Ridgetop Middle School: No City, No State)

3-D Instructional Materials and Assessments for Share-a-thon

Saturday, October 28 • 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Share-a-thon Area


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It takes a ton of time to make your own 3-D lessons and assessments. Come learn where you can get a ton of great ones that you can use in your classroom right away. Materials for life science, physical science, and earth-space science, grades 3-12.

TAKEAWAYS:
Where to find great 3-D instructional materials and assessments.

SPEAKERS:
Victor Sampson (The University of Texas at Austin: Austin, TX)

Assessing Preservice Teachers’ Knowledge and Experiences: A National Study

Saturday, October 28 • 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Share-a-thon Area


Show Details

The Science Education Dept. at Harvard University conducted a nationwide study, over the course of three semesters, on the strengths and weaknesses of STEM, and on the teaching knowledge of preservice educators who will soon enter the STEM teaching workforce. By examining pre-service teachers’ experiences before and during their preparation program, we’ll share our findings about experiences that optimize teacher knowledge for effective science teaching. The study also characterizes two essential types of teacher knowledge: 1) subject matter knowledge; and 2) pedagogical content knowledge concerning the common preconceptions and misconceptions held by learners, reflecting stages in student learning progressions. This research helps identify promising features of undergraduate PST programs for future implementation.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn what factors impact preservice teachers’ interest in teaching, the status of teacher education programs, and what are the strong and weak STEM content knowledge areas of preservice science teachers, including the prevalence of learning about students’ misconceptions.

SPEAKERS:
Philip Sadler (Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian: Cambridge, MA), Cynthia Crockett (Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian: Cambridge, MA)

Using Coding in the Science Classroom

Saturday, October 28 • 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Share-a-thon Area


Show Details

Using TI Nspires, Rovers, Hubs, and arrays attendees will learn how a science teacher from South Arkansas incorporated simple coding into his science classroom. We will draw VSEPR molecular models with Rovers, see how hubs and arrays can "brighten" up the electromagnetic spectrum calculations of wavelength, frequency, and energy with sound, pictures, and color. No coding experience necessary.

TAKEAWAYS:
Ideas on how you may incorporate simple coding into the science classroom and give topics new life.

SPEAKERS:
Chris Coker (Camden Fairview High School: Camden, AR)

CONSTRUCTing Effective Assessment Questions using the NGSS DCIs

Saturday, October 28 • 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Share-a-thon Area


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Using the Disciplinary Core Ideas and a research-based “citizen science” approach, science educators contributed their own test items, and helped to revise existing test items in order to address crucial issues such as difficulty, gender, and racial/ethnic bias that were present in the item analysis characteristics. We share the analysis and results of these efforts so that educators can assess their own test items to be more inclusive of all students’ understandings in one of the dimensions of the 3D-approach to learning. Learn what changes contributed to improvement of the item as well as what types of changes or revisions made the item worse than before. We also share results of field testing of these items in student classrooms and discuss the importance of incorporating students’ misconceptions into the response choices to capture their true understanding of science concepts as outlined in the DCIs.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn to evaluate assessment questions that you use to assess students’ sensemaking of elements outlined in the NGSS DCIs. Are the questions free of bias, not too difficult, indicative of overall student performance? Do they include common misconceptions that students hold? Utilize a free resource.

SPEAKERS:
Philip Sadler (Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian: Cambridge, MA), Cynthia Crockett (Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian: Cambridge, MA)

Get Ready for the April 8, 2024 Total Solar Eclipse

Saturday, October 28 • 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Share-a-thon Area


Show Details

The workshop will provide participants with the following information and learning experiences: 1.) Where and when the solar eclipse will be visible, including how to find what will specifically happen in their location. 2.) Three-Dimensional learning strategies to use with their students to understand what causes both lunar and solar eclipses, including what causes lunar phases and how knowing what causes lunar phases is key to knowing when eclipses occur. 3.) How to safely observe the eclipse using a variety of observing strategies 4.) Suggestions for how to make the most of the eclipse as a school and/or community-wide event. 5.) What overall resources that NSTA has to help them make the most of this celestial event.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will come away with links to 3-D teaching strategies for students to understand the science behind eclipses, plus safe viewing strategies and ways to make the event a school-wide experience.

SPEAKERS:
Dennis Schatz (Institute for Learning Innovation: Beaverton, OR)

Physically Active Modeling For Comparing States of Matter

Saturday, October 28 • 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Share-a-thon Area



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Ideal Gas Law Students as Particles Activity Handout.docx
Physically Active Modeling Ideal Gas Laws Lesson Plan.docx
Physically Active Modeling States of Matter (1).pptx
Physically Active Modeling States of Matter Blank Handout NSTA 2023 .docx
Physically Active Modeling States of Matter Slides Handout NSTA 2023 KC.docx
QR Code Physically Active Modeling For States Of Matter NSTA 2023.png

Show Details

This activity has students/participants act as particles. To start, participants are given baseline information about how attractive forces between particles can vary from very strong to negligible, & that particles are always in motion. To model very strong forces participants link arms at the elbow, for moderately strong forces they hold hands, & for weak/negligible forces they can only hold each other’s pinky fingers. Participants start far apart & move very slowly to model a very cold temperature. At this speed, all of the participants are able to form an organized structure (solid). With each iteration the participants move faster. This results in the weak force group not being able to form structure (gas), the moderate force group being clumped together but not organized (liquid), & the strong force group still being able to form an organized structure (solid). Activity will then be modified to explain WHY gas law variables have the relationships they do (P,V,T, n).

TAKEAWAYS:
Students will not only know the properties of solids, liquids, and gasses, but will also be able to give in-depth explanations as to WHY the properties are different by behaving as the particles at different temperatures and with different attractive forces.

SPEAKERS:
Clark Ellis (The Kinkaid School)

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