2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

Grade Level


Topics
























Strands











Session Type














Pathway/Course














 

Rooms and times subject to change.
26 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Physically Active Modeling For Comparing States of Matter

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2104 A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Ideal Gas Law Students as Particles Activity Handout.docx
Physically Active Modeling Ideal Gas Laws Lesson Plan.docx
Physically Active Modeling States of Matter (1).pptx
Physically Active Modeling States of Matter Blank Handout NSTA 2023 .docx
Physically Active Modeling States of Matter Slides Handout NSTA 2023 KC.docx
QR Code Physically Active Modeling For States Of Matter NSTA 2023.png

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

This activity has students/participants act as particles. To start, participants are given baseline information about how attractive forces between particles can vary from very strong to negligible, & that particles are always in motion. Participants then split into three groups, strong, moderate, & weak forces. To model very strong forces participants link arms at the elbow, for moderately strong forces they hold hands, & for weak/negligible forces they can only hold each other’s pinky fingers. Participants start far apart & move very slowly to model a very cold temperature. At this speed, all of the participants are able to catch onto each other & form an organized structure (solid). With each iteration the participants move faster; this results in the weak-force group not being able to form a structure (gas), the moderate-force group being clumped together but not organized (liquid), & the strong-force group still being able to form an organized structure (solid).

TAKEAWAYS:
Students will not only know the properties of solids, liquids, and gasses, but will be able to give in-depth explanations as to WHY the properties are different by behaving as the particles at different temperatures and with different attractive forces.

SPEAKERS:
Clark Ellis (The Kinkaid School)

Forms of Energy & Energy Transformations Interactive Lessons

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 A


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Participants will learn about forms of energy and their transformations by experimenting through six stations. Stations cover potential and kinetic energy, endothermic and exothermic processes, radiant energy, thermal and motion energy, chemical energy, and electrical energy. Within each, there are multiple activities to showcase the energy transformations occurring. The stations will be set up with materials needed, a hypothesis prompt, procedure list, and a station guide for recording data. For example, a yo-yo stores gravitational potential energy when it is in your hand until it drops. When it drops, the yo-yo transforms the potential energy into motion. At the end of experimenting, participants will review a “What’s Happening” sheet that explains what form of energy and energy transformation occurred in that station, as well as how it’s tied to the real-world applications. NEED activities are free and easily differentiated at the elementary, intermediate, and secondary level.

TAKEAWAYS:
How to help students master forms of energy and their transformations and how it can be visualized in the world around them.

SPEAKERS:
Don Pruett, Jr. (Washington Science Teachers Association: Everett, WA)

Space Telescopes: How they work, and how to simulate them in your classroom

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Julie Lee


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

An extension of our previous NASA/JWST ambassador and NSTA workshops, this session empowers educators with deeper understanding of orbiting observatories and provides an inherently engaging hands-on activity which works from pure STEM/STEAM fun to serious exploration of multi-wavelength astronomy. We provide gel filters that participants use with their phones to capture monochrome images at three wavelengths (630nm, 530nm & 470nm for red, green and blue). Participants then open their images in a free, browser-based image processing app to combine them into a "color" picture. This locks in an understanding of how "color" results from image processing. Then, participants choose NASA image files from an archive and repeat the process -- only now, they are assigning RG&B to wavelengths that are not actually visible to the eye. The tool we use includes both presets to make this fun as an introductory activity, and an array of math-driven functionality for deep dives into image processing.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will learn to process multi-wavelength image sets to create color images from space telescopes and your own devices. This leads to a deeper understanding of space-based astronomy and how space telescope images are made – and provides a classroom activity that is fun, rich, and economical.

SPEAKERS:
Donna Kaiser (Stamford High School: Stamford, CT), Vincent Urbanowski (Academy of Information Technology & Engineering: Stamford, CT)

Help Me Make Sense of This!!! Sense-making Tools for Physics

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Lester Young B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Sense-making in science - Workshop Materials
Workshop slides Sample activities and student work samples, organized by topic Source list for relevant lab equipment

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Explaining phenomena (e.g. “Why do I feel heavy in an elevator?”) requires sense-making of complex physics ideas and mathematical representations. Teachers will “wear a student hat” to explore visualization and writing strategies through active participation. First, we’ll explore the modeling practice of diagram and chart representations (e.g. energy bar charts). They’ll try using our “More is L.E.S.S.” (Model, List variables, Equations, Substitute & Solve) tool on engaging energy problems with a get-up-and-move “World-Café” collaborative learning strategy. In the second half of workshop, teachers will use informal writing. They’ll practice “Write a Story” in which they are given a representation (e.g. energy pie chart or equation) and they write a question. We’ll facilitate an interactive Gallery Walk to share additional writing activities: See/Think/Do; Annotated Derivations; Sticky Summaries, What’s Wrong With It, and One-Pagers). The “gallery” will include student work.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn how to use visual representations, informal writing activities, and collaborative structures to help students explain physics phenomena.

SPEAKERS:
Jaimie Foulk (Rock Bridge High School: Columbia, MO), Karen King (Physics Teacher)

Exploring Sound Waves Using The Human Body & Simple Instruments

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2102 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/12EMQcx20vFs6XNBkoL-vsq2PosR1Dt2V

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Slides with diagrams of the anatomy of the larynx are shown with the parts & functions being described to participants. As the anatomy is being taught there will be breaks for participants to talk to each other while feeling their throats, chest, nose, mouth, jaw, etc to feel the vibrations & notice how damping the vibrations changes how participants sound to themselves & others. Next, videos of an opera singer in an MRI machine are shown to see the anatomy in action. After this whistles, & recorders will be passed out for participants to play the same note but hear the difference in sound. A visualizer showing the relative amplitude of each frequency is used as participants play so they can see that each instrument creates its own unique set of waves in addition to the fundamental tone that is being played. The process is repeated for multiple singers that are singing the same note.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will be able to use direct instruction, demonstrations, and short activities to explain the basics of how human voices are able to produce sound, why each person/instrument has a unique sound, and why your voice sounds different to you than it does on recordings.

SPEAKERS:
Brendan Emig (Middle/Upper School Choral Director: Houston, TX), Clark Ellis (The Kinkaid School)

Analyzing X-Ray Pulses from Stellar Cores Using Physics and Web-Based NASA Data, and STEM Image Analysis Tools

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Lester Young A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Analysis of Two Pulsating X-ray sources js9 (revised).pdf
Analysis of X-Ray Sources with Js9 presentation
Js9 Astronomy Image Analysis Software
X-Ray Spectroscopy of SNRs js9 presentation

STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Participants will use light curve graphs and image analysis software tools located on the web to investigate stellar objects at the centers of supernova remnants, and determine if the objects are white dwarfs or neutron stars. Two sets of data from the Chandra X-Ray public archive will be used to plot brightness versus time to determine the rate of rotation of the object. Centripetal acceleration and Newton's Universal Law of gravitation calculations will then be applied. This activity is designed for physics and/or astronomy classes and integrates STEM analysis tools with the crosscutting concepts, physical science core disciplinary content and engineering concepts embodied by NGSS. Students may also use tools learned in this activity to use js9 to do further research projects using publicly available astronomy data sets.

TAKEAWAYS:
Light curves generated from web-based js9 image analysis software can be used to determine the period of rotation and identify objects as white dwarfs or pulsars using Newton’s Universal Law of gravitation and centripetal acceleration calculations.

SPEAKERS:
Pamela Perry (Lewiston High School: Lewiston, ME)

AUTHOR: Once Upon a Physical Science Book: Real Science, Real Literacy Instruction

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 C


Show Details

The session will open with having participants work through pieces of Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 from Once Upon a Physical Science Book. We will play with marbles to explore inertia, read about inertia's effect on kids in a school bus, and write an explanation of inertia. Then we'll try out gumdrop wave machines read, an article on bat echolocation, and outline a short letter that students could write after doing the reading. Next, we will discuss the "shape" of the lesson we just worked through, called a literacy learning cycle. From there, we will look at several specific difficulties that arise for students when they are asked to read and write (expectations, background knowledge, and meaningful writing). These topics will illustrate why a literacy learning cycle is so helpful. Finally, we will talk briefly about how the Once Upon a Science Book series can serve as a resource for literacy learning cycles.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will be introduced to the literacy learning cycle format, in which hands-on work precedes meaningful reading and writing activities. They will see how this system works by participating in lessons on wave motion and inertia.

SPEAKERS:
Matthew Hackett (Delta Woods Middle School: Blue Springs, MO), Jodi Wheeler-Toppen (Author/ Staff Development: Atlanta, GA)

Microwaves: Introducing the OpenSciEd HS Electromagnetic Radiation Unit

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Basie Ballroom A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

OpenSciEd HS Physics units use a storyline approach to help students figure out answers to their questions in a three-dimensional, coherent, and equitable way. In this session, participants will experience that approach firsthand as they engage with the fifth unit’s anchor in ""student hat"", a unit anchored in the use of the microwave and its interactions with wireless devices. Participants will see how students develop and use different models to explore ideas about electromagnetic waves and their interactions with matter. They will also see some of the investigations students plan and carry out using different materials inside the microwave oven to explain energy transfer. Participants will also see how the unit supports students’ sensemaking to explain how different technologies apply these ideas to produce, transmit, and capture signals, and the potential risk associated with their uses.

TAKEAWAYS:
This unit is anchored in the use of the microwave and its interactions with wireless devices. Students figure out and use ideas about waves and their interactions with matter to explain how different technologies apply these ideas to transfer energy and to produce, transmit, and capture signals.

SPEAKERS:
Zoe Buck Bracey (Senior Science Educator and Director of Design for Justice: Colorado Springs, CO), Diego Rojas-Perilla (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO)

Physics Lessons in the Science Practices Innovation Notebook (SPIN)

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Bennie Moten


STRAND: Tech Tools

Show Details

SPIN, a FREE web-based notebook created with funding by NSF, has 4 customizable lessons for data-focused investigations in Physics on Centripetal Force, Ohm’s Law, Pendulums, and Impact. Teachers can also input their own lessons into SPIN. One of the teachers who created the lessons in the notebook will be presenting. During the first 30 minutes, presenters will give teachers accounts in SPIN and show how students can use the notebook and the metacognitive support features such as the Communication Hub, I’m Stuck button, and SPAARC prompts. Experiences of teachers and students who have used SPIN will be discussed. In the final 30 minutes, teachers will customize a lesson in SPIN or input their own lessons with help from the presenters. By the end of the session, teachers will be able to use SPIN effectively with the ability to share the notebook with all of the teachers at their school. Use of SPIN is entirely free and is found at https://spin.cehd.gmu.edu/login.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will learn how to use SPIN to download and edit a lesson from the Global Marketplace or create their own lesson in SPIN. Teachers who have used SPIN note that it has helped their students understand data practices explicitly.

SPEAKERS:
Erin Barrett (Physics Teacher: Purcellville, VA), Erin Peters-Burton (George Mason University: Fairfax, VA)

Physics Through Flight

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Lester Young B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
National Free Flight Society Homepage
Presentation Slides
Science Olympiad Homepage
Science Olympiad Program Information

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Ever since the Wright Brothers first took flight in Kitty Hawk, the idea of powered flight has fascinated and captivated people. Unfortunately, despite flight's engaging nature and connections to fundamental physics concepts it is not a common topic in classrooms. Throughout our combined 97 years of existence our organizations, the National Free Flight Society and Science Olympiad, have been working to change this reality. In this session, we will introduce attendees to the idea of free flight model aircraft, demonstrate how these aircraft can be flown safely in schools, and share the variety of instructional resources that are immediately available for classroom use. Following this, we will identify ways attendees can take what they have learned and the activities available to enhance their classroom instruction. The session will close with a demonstration flight of a free flight model aircraft built from start to finish during this 60-minute session.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn the art of the possible when it comes to using flight as a topic to engage students in their study of forces, free body diagrams, and Newton's Laws.

SPEAKERS:
David Lindley (President: Lisle, IL), Julie Newman (Engineer), John Loehr (Science Olympiad: Oakbrook Terrace, IL)

Space-Based Observatories – Use Them Like an Astronomer

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Lester Young A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Presentational content will include a high level overview of NASA’s Great Observatories and other past and present orbiting telescopes, how their missions are coordinated, and how they work in concert to provide full spectrum data from across the sky in bands from gamma down to far infrared – almost all of which are invisible to the human eye. In the workshop portion, participants will access archived astronomical data from orbiting observatories using the same browser based tools used by astronomers. They will process their datasets using a variety of tools and techniques for reducing data, vetting objects, and generating results, such as Spectral Energy Distribution, Color-Color and Color-Magnitude plots. Teachers will bring this experience back to their classrooms adding depth of knowledge to astronomy content they may teach, as well as a deeper understanding of the conduct of science research.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn to access astronomical data such as monochrome images at various wavelengths and wavelength magnitude measurements for thousands of stars at a time just as professional astronomers do, and how to process such data for research using techniques of professional astronomy.

SPEAKERS:
Donna Kaiser (Stamford High School: Stamford, CT), Vincent Urbanowski (Academy of Information Technology & Engineering: Stamford, CT)

Upgrading Science with Artificial Intelligence

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Andy Kirk


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Seckinger High School utilizes an Artificial Intelligence framework that is incorporated into every subject. The framework will be shared with a see-think-wonder protocol. Participants will work through 3 sample lessons integrating parts of the framework. The Biology lesson will feature 3 uses of generative text models for learning: analysis of generated text for accuracy, creation of generative images for student productivity, and use of generative text models for creative problem-solving and student ideation. For the Chemistry lesson, students will use PASCO probes, along with their knowledge of acids and bases, chemical bonding, and properties to design a solution to a real-world problem. The Physics lesson will use an inquiry-based investigation to discover the coefficient of friction while comparing data between a spring scale and PASCO probes. Participants will receive hard copies of handouts and access to all digital resources.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how to “upgrade” their lessons as education continues to move into the phase of artificial intelligence.

SPEAKERS:
Holly Hall (Seckinger High School: No City, No State), Natasaskia Wayne (Gwinnett County Public Schools: No City, No State), Krystal Shearon (Seckinger High School)

Designing for Justice with Attention to Social and Emotional Learning in OpenSciEd HS Physics

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Basie Ballroom A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Justice in P3 NSTA KC 2023- uploaded to NSTA.pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

"Designing for justice means centering inquiry on phenomena that cross the artificial boundary between human and natural systems. The result is instruction that not only teaches students to understand the natural world, but broadens their perspectives on how humans fit into natural systems, what constitutes science, and what they can accomplish using science. In high school, some of the design problems that students are noticing in the world may feel overwhelming, but breaking them down using the ideas and practices of science and providing social emotional supports can help students find hope and resilience. For example in OpenSciEd High School Physics, students ask: What can we do to make driving safer for everyone? Consider how instruction can support students in making positive changes in their communities while attending to students social and emotional needs. "

TAKEAWAYS:
In OpenSciEd HS Physics, students use science ideas and practices to make sense of design problems that emerge from complex systems at the nature-human divide with attention to students’ social and emotional needs.

SPEAKERS:
Whitney Mills (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO), Laura Zeller (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO)

Clean Cut - Learning about Simple Machines and Engineering Design

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2102 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
CleanCut

STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Simple machines are historically a difficult subject to teach due in part to limited integration with other content. The Clean Cut unit is suitable for upper elementary students and combines the concept of the wedge and the engineering design process. The goal is not only to introduce students to simple machines but also to introduce them to the nature of engineering design. Throughout the unit, students learn that one perfect solution does not exist; instead, they learn to tolerate and learn from failures. The students learn why simple machines are used in everyday life and design a solution to a problem while learning about and using an engineering design process. The students refine their design to fit within the constraints and criteria set by a client. Students test the design and collect qualitative data to refine their design. The unit includes a summative assessment in the form of a letter to the client describing what was learned about simple machines and engineering design.

TAKEAWAYS:
The context of the lesson is designing a tool to split soap for use by people who have been through a natural disaster. Participants will learn about the integrated approach using engineering design and simple machines, experience part of the unit, and receive the handouts for use in the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
William Walker (Assistant Director, CATALYST: No City, No State), Sopheak Seng (Mr.: Lafayette, IN)

New Tools for Analyzing and Creating Astronomical Images from Vera C. Rubin Observatory

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Lester Young A


STRAND: Tech Tools

Show Details

Rubin Observatory is a public US observatory funded by the NSF. Educational materials and services are freely available to all. “Coloring the Universe” is one of six free online investigations that offer a complete, classroom ready lesson. Designed to support the NGSS, it comes with a phenomenon, teacher guide, presentation slides, videos, and a variety of three-dimensional formative and summative assessments and scoring guides. Since the entire lesson cannot be completed in 60 minutes, we will adopt a drop in approach at various places of the phenomenon and online app, and role-playing from the student perspective.We will then visit the website to preview additional resources. This workshop will also model how the lesson can be incorporated in Earth-Space or Physics storylines, and will demonstrate formative assessment and inclusive learning techniques.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how to use the free interactive Coloring the Universe online investigation and support materials designed for NGSS teaching and learning, as well as active learning and assessment strategies that support inclusive techniques for building student communication skills.

SPEAKERS:
Ardis Herrold (Vera C. Rubin Observatory: Tucson, AZ)

Vehicle Efficiency: An Engineering Design Challenge to Promote Equity in the Science Classroom

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Lester Young B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Vehicle Efficiency_ An EDC to Promote Equity in Science.pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Authentic engineering challenges are a highlight of my physics courses because of the increase in student engagement and depth of content understanding. I’ve also experienced the ways these design challenges level the playing field for all because problem solving and applying knowledge is valued. Yet, despite the many benefits of integrating engineering design in science classrooms, this component of the NGSS can easily be overlooked. In this workshop, participants immerse in the world of engineering design and optimization. Teacher teams will engage in a design task and subsequent design optimization. We’ll debrief strategies for incorporating engineering design activities into high school units and discuss techniques for implementation, while focusing on the engineering design cycle and the importance of optimization. Observations on how these design challenges invite all students into the discipline of physics will be shared. The takeaways are applicable to all science disciplines.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will take away a complete Engineering Design Challenge (EDC) that includes strategies for incorporating an EDC into an energy unit, highlighted disciplinary core ideas, templates for student analysis and reflection, and a three-dimensional assessment based on the EDC.

SPEAKERS:
Susan Swan (Vashon High School: Vashon, WA)

Engaging in Argumentation from Evidence in the Middle School Realm

Saturday, October 28 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2207


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

What does rich student discourse look like in a middle school science classroom? How can spirited debates over scientific principles erupt from prepubescent teens? I found myself skeptical when my colleague first brought the PEER Physics curriculum to my attention. How could a curriculum that was initially designed for undergraduate non-science majors and was revised to be applicable for high school contexts, possibly work in middle school? But I found that it not only “worked”, students thrived. I had longed for my students to authentically engage in science practices. In this workshop, I’ll share my experience with bringing PEER Physics into middle school. I’ll invite you into examples of middle school discourse by showing video and student reflections. Workshop participants will consider norming strategies that can support students in rich discourse in middle school science courses. And see how the three-dimensional learning from PEER changed the rest of my instruction.

TAKEAWAYS:
Through video examples and hands-on learning, participants will see what evidence-based student discourse looks like at the middle school level. They will also walk away with tangible strategies, having experienced some of these strategies themselves.

SPEAKERS:
Daniela Del Cid (8th grade Science teacher: Thornton, CO)

Engaging in Argumentation Around Complex Socioscientific Decision-Making: Using the Learning in Places Framework in OpenSciEd High School Physics

Saturday, October 28 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 H



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Argumentation in P3 NSTA KC 2023- uploaded to NSTA.pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The Framework calls for students to engage in argumentation from evidence in a way that considers relevant social, ethical, and environmental tradeoffs that cannot be resolved without considering the values of interested parties. As educators, we need to honor students’ diverse experiences and value systems while also engaging students in the process of respectful scientific argumentation. OpenSciEd High School uses the Learning in Places Framework to inform the design of an argumentation tool for students to guide them through the process of weighing science ideas, societal and environmental impacts, and ethical considerations when evaluating potentially controversial arguments and design solutions. Join us to engage with an adapted version of this argumentation process. Participants will explore the Learning in Places Framework for Socio Ecological Decision Making and discuss use of the Learning in Places Framework within the classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
The NGSS calls for students to weigh complex socioscientific tradeoffs, including social, cultural, and environmental impacts. The Learning in Places Framework can be used to help structure student engagement in argumentation that requires decision-making around these tradeoffs.

SPEAKERS:
Whitney Mills (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO), Laura Zeller (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO)

Co-design as a strategy for developing high quality instructional materials that support coherence from the students’ perspective in OpenSciEd High School Physics

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 H


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Over the past decade, researchers and practitioners have been calling for more attention to coherence from the student perspective as a key part of curriculum design. This type of coherence arises when students see what they do in the science classroom as productive for addressing meaningful questions and problems. A curriculum that is coherent from the student perspective provides opportunities for all students to contribute to class sensemaking. We will present co-design strategies used by OpenSciEd teams to develop high quality, NGSS-aligned instructional materials that are coherent from the student perspective. Participants will engage in a student hat experience to focus on how that lens can support student coherence in materials and instruction. Participants will explore a variety of co-design strategies for building coherence in developing and implementing instructional materials, with an emphasis on coherence from the student perspective through the use of student hat.

TAKEAWAYS:
When designing and revising NGSS-aligned high-quality instructional materials, co-design in student-hat is a powerful tool for weaving together coherence from the teacher’s perspective within science content, and from students’ perspective.

SPEAKERS:
Laura Zeller (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO), Diego Rojas-Perilla (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO)

Connecting Math and Science Through Technology: Data Analysis Made Easy

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2504 B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The workshop will offer ideas to move from the typical teacher-led classroom to one that focuses on problem-solving, data analysis and exploratory learning. Learn how to combine graphing calculators with handheld sensors to maximize class time and provide opportunities for engaging inquiry and discussion. We will illustrate how you can utilize science tasks to support your 3-D initiative and the goals outlined in the NGSS, while at the same time reinforcing and seamlessly integrating CCSS for Mathematics. You can use one sensor at a time or multiple sensors simultaneously for lab-based or in-the-field data collection to quickly collect and analyze data. Several sensors will be available to explore this integrated solution. Hands-on science using this integrated technology gets students excited about science and math and deepens their understanding of seemingly complex concepts. It will free up class time for student engagement in the analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of real data.

TAKEAWAYS:
Use real data to develop mathematical models and learn how to test your hypothesis by performing an experiment and analyzing your results, combining graphing calculators with handheld sensors to maximize class time.

SPEAKERS:
Karlheinz Haas (Science/Math Instructor, Retired: Tequesta, FL)

Google Sites for the Advanced Science Lab

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2102 A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Resources for Building Your Google Site

STRAND: Tech Tools

Show Details

Attendees will walk through the process of creating a Google Site specific to their classroom. They will learn how to create a master template to share with their students and how to help their students get started with the Google Site. They will also learn how to support their students as the Google Site is used to submit projects, portfolios, or lab notebooks. Attendees will learn how to insert pictures, files, and videos into the Google Site to create a more interactive resource for students. Attendees will begin to create their own template in the session with the goal of having a template ready to use in their classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
Google Sites streamlines the grading process for lab notebooks and projects.

SPEAKERS:
Brodie Solomon (Physics Teacher: Ft Worth, TX), Katie Labadie (Science Department Chair: Fort Worth, TX)

Building Thinking Classrooms in Science

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 1501 B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Participants will engage in a thinking classroom for developing and using a constant velocity particle model by: • Observing a constant velocity toy car moving across the floor • Recording and summarizing their observations of the car • Developing a driving question board about their observations • Designing an experiment that could answer their question • Working in small groups to make sense of the model and apply it to a new situation using a thinking task • Discussing in a whole group a consensus model for any particle moving with a constant velocity • Examine the pedagogy that led to student thinking and sensemaking of the scientific model.

TAKEAWAYS:
Thinking classroom practices create the optimal conditions for learner-centered, student-owned science thinking and learning, and have the power to transform science classrooms.

SPEAKERS:
Earl Legleiter (Legleiter Science Consulting: Hays, KS)

Using Authentic Data to Evaluate the Expansion of the Unverse

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 E


STRAND: Tech Tools

Show Details

Rubin Observatory is a public US observatory funded by the NSF. Educational materials and services are freely available to all. “Expanding Universe” is one of six free online investigations that offer a complete, classroom ready lesson. Designed to support the NGSS, it comes with a phenomenon, teacher guide, presentation slides, videos, and a variety of three-dimensional formative and summative assessments and scoring guides. This workshop will model scaffolded teaching and assessment techniques to help students achieve success in making sense of abstract concepts presented in the lesson. Since the entire lesson cannot be completed in 60 minutes, we will adopt a drop in approach at various points by using portions of the phenomenon and the online app, and role-playing from the student perspective. We will then visit the website to preview additional resources.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how to use the free interactive Expanding Universe online investigation and support materials designed for NGSS teaching and learning, as well as scaffolded teaching, and as formative assessment strategies to ensure that all students may achieve a successful learning experience.

SPEAKERS:
Ardis Herrold (Vera C. Rubin Observatory: Tucson, AZ)

Making Physics Accessible: A Pedagogy For Engaging High School Students Using Socio-Scientific Issues (SSI)

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 1501 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Dylan Fedell - NSTA23 Workshop Presentation
NSTA23 - Activity1_AllAboutSpeed.pdf
Students gather information on the SSI using teacher-selected articles. The KWL helps students organize information to include in their posters and during the jigsaw activity.
NSTA23 - TakeaStanceActivity.pdf
Students elucidate their initial positions using this CER document.

STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

By reframing curricular content already taught by the teacher, a debatable issue introduces and guides each curricular unit by engaging students at the intersection of their current level of scientific understanding and the world outside of the classroom. Students are then navigated through this multi-step process, which deepens their understanding of physics while at the same time developing their stance on the issue using evidence to support their claim. New learning in both transdisciplinary content and student agency aspects allows students to leave the classroom experience empowered to make real changes to their surroundings.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will leave this workshop with hands-on experience engaging in the SSI process from a learner’s perspective, and with a framework for developing and implementing their own.

SPEAKERS:
Dylan Fedell (Physics Teacher: KINTNERSVILLE, PA)

Start Your Engines: Middle School Physics Fun

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 C


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

In the presentation, I will be sharing activities for a 6-8 aligned unit on force and motion. The activities the participants will experience will include: a hands-on activity with technology to collect and analyze data that will aid in calculating speed and a hands-on activity using technology to graph motion in real time. I will also provide links to activities/projects that participants can use that will not be demonstrated/experienced that will align the concept of force and motion to TEKS for grades 6-8.

TAKEAWAYS:
Vertically aligned lessons for teaching force and motion that involves hands-on experiences which will engage your students. We will use hot wheels to collect data to calculate speed and create motion graphs using hands-on technology.

SPEAKERS:
Rebecca Walker (Tays Junior High School: Katy, TX), Amy Rush (Lufkin Middle School: Lufkin, TX)

"When am I Going to Use This?" Resources That You Can Use to Make Topics That Students See as Irrelevant More Meaningful for Students

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2206


STRAND: Tech Tools

Show Details

The session will give teachers an opportunity to participate in the same sort of rich and meaningful learning experiences that are called for by the NGSS. This session, as a result, will include approximately forty minutes of audience participation in student hat. Teachers will leave with high-quality instructional materials that they can use in their own classrooms. The agenda for this session is: • A discussion of some topics that are challenging to teach because many students see them as irrelevant and why students think this way about them (10 mins). • An opportunity for participants to experience an example of how a meaningful and authentic phenomenon can drive a learning experience (40 mins) • An overview of a tech tool to help teachers create these types of learning experiences (5 mins) • Questions and suggestions for learning more (5 mins)

TAKEAWAYS:
Meaningful phenomena and authentic problems can make topics not only more meaningful for students, but can also make instruction more rigorous and equitable.

SPEAKERS:
Todd Hutner (The University of Alabama: Austin, TX)

Back to Top