2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

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Rooms and times subject to change.
36 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Students and Challenging Texts—Graphic Narratives, Lay Summaries, and Cooperative Groups

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2105



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Note to participants
Slide presentation (info, resources, agenda)
Students and Challenging Texts
Workshop on helping students with challenging texts. Folder with a number of resources and examples.

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Science writing is an essential part of authentic science. However, both perception and reality suggest that science texts of various genres are difficult and challenging for many students. What can a teacher do to help students meet challenges so that they can realize the beauty and significance of pivotal works in the history of science, groundbreaking contemporary research, and the deep reflections found in scientific creative non-fiction? In this workshop we will try out techniques based on cooperative groups who create graphic narratives and lay summaries. An assortment of texts will be available to explore, like the concluding paragraph to Darwin’s Origin of Species and the story of Carbon by Primo Levi. Experience in the classroom will be shared where understanding of the texts is achieved by students, including reluctant readers and English language learners.

TAKEAWAYS:
Great, significant, and sometimes difficult written works in science can become accessible to students through cooperative groups, graphic narratives, and lay summaries.

SPEAKERS:
Richard Frazier (retired)

Developing Visual Literacy in Science: Strategies and Resources

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2102 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Participants will experience using dialogue structures and literacy skills in the science classroom. Research shows that when students are engaged with the content and are allowed the chance to make sense of it for themselves, they will learn more. Participants will experience mini lessons that incorporate phenomena and showcase research-proven structures. Participants will be actively learning strategies that can be implemented in classrooms to increase visual literacy amongst students. Strategies include reading, writing, speaking, and graphing skills. Science examples will be modeled. There will be collaborative discussions on how these strategies can be incorporated into a variety of grade levels. Throughout these strategies, we will focus on the dialogue structures set in place to encourage all students to participate and use the academic language. Each of these structures focuses on the teacher being the facilitator of the learning, rather than leading the discussions.

TAKEAWAYS:
Takeaways include: 1. Identify how literacy and dialogue are an integral part in sensemaking; 2. Engage in examples of activities that integrate speaking, listening, and reading into the science classroom; and 3. Pick up tips to promote retention of vocabulary through scaffolding.

SPEAKERS:
Molly Niedens (Tays Junior High School: Katy, TX)

How to Promote and Support Learning After Introducing a Phenomenon

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The session will give teachers an opportunity to participate in the same sort of rich and meaningful learning experiences that are called for by the NGSS. This session, as a result, will include approximately forty minutes of audience participation in student hat. Teachers will leave with high-quality instructional materials that they can use in their own classrooms. The agenda for this session is: • A discussion of characteristics of phenomenon-based instruction and sensemaking (5 mins). • A discussion of obstacles to sensemaking during a learning experience (10 minutes). • An opportunity for participants to experience an example of how support learners use DCIs, CCs, and SEPs during a learning experience in a way that makes the process of sensemaking useful and inclusive (40 mins). • Questions and suggestions for learning more (5 mins).

TAKEAWAYS:
Introducing meaningful phenomena is necessary, but not sufficient for fostering sensemaking. Students must also have opportunities to use DCIs, CCs, and SEPs during the learning experience, and the experience must be structured in ways that make the process of sensemaking useful and inclusive.

SPEAKERS:
Victor Sampson (The University of Texas at Austin: Austin, TX)

People and Wildlife: Lessons on Interconnections and Biodiversity

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2104 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The growth of human settlements and natural resource use have impacted our wild spaces and led to fragmented habitats, pollution, and overharvesting. In this hands-on session, the presenter will lead participants in hands-on classroom activities that explore ecological footprints and possible paths toward sustainability. The presenter will introduce concepts around human ecology, including human population trends, biodiversity trends, and how human activities (agricultural expansion, deforestation, etc.) have impacted wildlife habitats. Most of the session will be the demonstration of hands-on activities that address NGSS content, but also integrate mathematics, social studies, and language arts. Activity formats include a large-group simulation on carrying capacity in nature, a visual demonstration of the breakdown of land use around the globe, and a modeling activity on biodiversity threats in different ecosystems.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn hands-on, collaborative approaches to guide students’ inquiry around key ecological concepts on population, wildlife, and biodiversity, using 3-D strategies and sensemaking.

SPEAKERS:
Vanessa Wyss (Professor: Big Rapids, MI)

Getting a Foothold for Creating Three-Dimensional Classroom-Based Assessment Tasks

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 A


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Learn a design process for creating three-dimensional assessment tasks that support instruction and student learning. Participants will be introduced to each phase: unpacking dimensions, developing integrated dimension maps, articulating learning performances, identifying phenomena, and designing tasks.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn the steps of a systematic process for designing three-dimensional tasks that align with NGSS performance expectations, take into consideration students’ diverse backgrounds, and can be used in classrooms to provide information to teachers and students to improve learning.

SPEAKERS:
Joseph Krajcik (CREATE for STEM Institute, Michigan State University: East Lansing, MI)

Smart Circuits: The Power of Logic Gates and Relays

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2104 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Hebert.pptx
Smart Circuits 2023 NSTA.pdf

STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

University of Illinois STEM educators have created classroom activities that allow students to conceptually explore topics in electricity. The workshop activities include assembling a breakout board that models a simplified power system for a small neighborhood. The circuit prototype responds to an outage and redirects the flow of power. Participants explore the components and characteristics of simple circuits, logic gates, and relays. They also engage in an energy delivery themed, escape room style activity developed by educators at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign with support from the US Department of Energy. This virtual environment presents a fictional, but based on real events, cascading blackout scenario and challenges players to find the cause. Participants analyze data from the blackout, determine what went wrong, and propose strategies to prevent another such event in the future. Time will be allotted for debriefing and sharing ideas for classroom implementation.

TAKEAWAYS:
The US power grid is the system of producers and consumers of electricity. It includes power generators, switches, substations, miles of power lines, and millions of transformers. The power grid is continually evolving as we integrate alternative power resources and invent technologies.

SPEAKERS:
Lara Hebert (Assistant Director, Engineering Public Engagement: Urbana, IL), Jana Sebestik (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign: Champaign, IL)

Exploring Practices, Nature of Science, and Science in Society: Analyzing Historical Primary Sources from the Library of Congress

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2102 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
CCC One Pager
How to use primary sources in the science classroom, phenomena and cross cutting concepts focus
Historical continental drift newspaper headlines
Historical continental drift newspaper headlines
Human Ferris Wheel primary source
Human Ferris Wheel primary source
Library of Congress Connecting List
List of primary sources we used for our opening activity, with urls to access.
NOS One Pager
How to use historical primary sources in the classroom...nature of science focus.
Primary Source Analysis Tool and Guide
Primary Source Analysis Tool and Guide
Ptolemaic Universe Primary Source
Ptolemaic Universe Primary Source
Using Historical Primary Sources in the Classroom Presentation
Using Historical Primary Sources in the Classroom Presentation

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Digitized versions of Thomas Jefferson’s weather journal, Robert Hooke’s first drawings of cells, photographs from the Dust Bowl, and historic newspaper accounts of electric cars all provide opportunities to understand how scientists and engineers think, practice, and apply scientific principles in the real world; how scientific ideas evolve over time; and how science and engineering are related to society. The Library of Congress has millions of free primary sources online. This workshop will focus on how analyzing such sources can help K-12 teachers meet standards and teaching goals, particularly around the nature of science, practices of scientists, and how science, technology, and society interact. Library education experts will facilitate hands-on activities using primary sources and share ways teachers nationwide have used them. Participants will also leave with strategies for using primary sources to develop critical thinking skills and highlight interdisciplinary connections.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how to access millions of free digitized primary sources and practice hands-on strategies for using them to promote critical thinking skills and a deeper understanding of real-world scientific practices, the nature of science, and connections between science and society.

SPEAKERS:
Kelsey Beeghly (Einstein Fellow: Altamonte Springs, FL), Michael Apfeldorf (Library of Congress: Washington, DC)

Cracking the CER Code: How a Mi-STAR Lesson Can Help Your Students Construct Explanations and Argue from Evidence with Confidence

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2102 A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Cracking the CER Code Handout
Cracking the CER Code Slides

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Mi-STAR is a program at Michigan Technological University dedicated to quality NGSS-aligned curriculum since 2015. We listen carefully to teachers and respond with support. One of the struggles teachers mention most often is in scaffolding students to write CERs and arguments. In our presentation, we propose an addition to the traditional template: the scientific principles, which are then combined with evidence in the reasoning statement. Later, we add another part: a space for using persuasive writing to construct an argument. We model activities from our 5E lesson throughout. Teachers collaborate to create CERs, and to evaluate arguments written by others. Then, they construct their own arguments using a productive talk routine and persuasive language prompts. Participants gain confidence in supporting students to construct explanations and arguments, as well as get first-hand experience with a lesson, tools, and activities they can take back to their classroom for immediate use.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will leave with clear and concise definitions of reasoning, explanations, and argumentation, along with a lesson plan, activities, and templates to help students define and construct all three in the science classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Jenne VandePanne (Michigan Technological University/Newaygo Public Schools: Newaygo, MI), Chris Geerer (Mi-STAR: , MI)

I’ll Have Another Drink…And Another…And Another... A 3-D Lesson to Investigate and Make Sense of the Drinking Bird Phenomenon

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The drinking bird is a classic heat engine toy that has been featured in popular culture. Although the cause-and-effect relationship for this phenomenon is clear, the mechanism for its repetitive movement is puzzling for most students. In this workshop, participants will use investigative and sensemaking practices to explore the drinking bird phenomenon. This interactive 3-D lesson is in alignment with the goals, standards, and practices of the NGSS. In addition, tips to enhance the development and use of student explanatory models will be featured.

TAKEAWAYS:
Workshop participants will experience an interactive and engaging three-dimensional lesson that is in alignment with the goals and practices of the Next Generation Science Standards. In addition, tips to enhance the development and use of student-created explanatory models will be featured.

SPEAKERS:
Bryan Horan (Northport - East Northport UFSD: Northport, NY)

Classroom Discourse for Sensemaking Through the Crosscutting Concepts

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

This is session #2 in the NSTA Professional Learning Committee's CCCs Conference Course and is designed to support K-12. Attendees will explore the Framework progression documents to understand what is appropriate for their grade level. They will learn about and engage in hands-on activities paired with talk strategies and protocols that focus classroom talk on making sense of observations and data using the Crosscutting Concepts. Attendees will have the chance to talk with fellow participants about how they might use these strategies and tools in their classroom or role and how they can be differentiated to be used at different grade levels. Participants will leave with a virtual toolbox of resources they can take home and apply right away in their sphere.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will leave with discussion strategies and tools they can implement right away in classrooms to support student discourse and sensemaking anchored in the Crosscutting Concepts.

SPEAKERS:
Rebecca Garelli (Arizona Science Teachers Association), Kimberley Astle (Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction: Olympia, WA)

Making Sense of Data Through the Crosscutting Concepts

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

This is session #3 in the PL Committee CCCs Pathway and is designed to support K-12. Participants will explore the Framework progression documents to understand what is appropriate for their grade level in relation to the Crosscutting Concept of Patterns. They will learn about and engage with a few effective instructional strategies, including the I2 Strategy from BSCS (Identify and Interpret), and how to use a “slow reveal” approach to help students make sense of data and graphs. Attendees will also have the opportunity to explore a variety of online sources for obtaining data for students to analyze and interpret. Participants will leave with a virtual toolbox of resources they can take home and immediately apply in their classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will leave with sensemaking strategies for engaging students in the Science and Engineering Practice of Analyzing and Interpreting Data, through the lens of the Crosscutting Concept of Patterns, that can immediately be implemented with students!

SPEAKERS:
Kimberley Astle (Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction: Olympia, WA), Rebecca Garelli (Arizona Science Teachers Association)

Infographics: Increasing Visual Literacy

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Infographics: Improving Visual Literacy Participant Handout
This link provides access to this session's participant handout.
Infographics: Improving Visual Literacy Presentation Slides
This link is for access to the presentation slide deck.

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Students today are exposed to an information-rich environment that is inundated with visual images. Likewise, science relies heavily on the use of visuals to present technical information. Instructional strategies will be shared that use infographics to engage students with the science and engineering practices to make sense of complex information quickly and clearly. Participants will experience a “think-aloud” to extrapolate information from an infographic and work through an evaluation tool to determine its scientific credibility. In addition, they will learn ways to incorporate infographics to spark debate, construct a scientific argument using the claim-evidence-reasoning framework, and complete a problem analysis to find a solution to an everyday problem. Finally, resources will be shared in how to develop student-created infographics.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn instructional strategies to support student sensemaking through the use of visually-rich infographics. This includes using science and engineering practices to analyze and interpret data, construct explanations, and engage in argument from evidence in secondary classrooms.

SPEAKERS:
Tina Hovance (Katy ISD: Katy, TX)

Phenomenal Lesson: Hudson Bay River Ecology

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2104 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

How do populations fluctuate in the Hudson River ecosystem, and how do these changes affect the larger ecological community? Using data and hands-on investigations, we will explore how food webs and the abiotic resources have changed in response to the zebra mussel invasion. Teachers will get a lesson explaining how the zebra mussel invasion affected the food web of the Hudson River and be able to explain at least two connections within the food web that were affected using evidence from provided data. Data will include charts and graphs that depict organisms commonly found in the Hudson. When utilizing this lesson in the classroom, students will know what lives in the Hudson River, and will be able to create & study a food web drawing to represent the organisms living in the river. They will also know that the Hudson River food web is changing in response to the zebra mussel invasion, and will be able to make predictions about how native organisms will be affected by this invasion.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will get a lesson explaining how the zebra mussel invasion affected the food web of the Hudson River and be able to explain at least two connections within the food web that were affected using evidence from provided data.

SPEAKERS:
Karen Pennywell (Cardiff Junior High School: Katy, TX), Sandra Rodriguez (Katy ISD: Katy, TX)

CER-iously Fun: Engaging Students in Science with Claim-Evidence-Reasoning

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2101



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA KC.pptx
NSTA KC_Session Worksheet.pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

A meta-learning experience of Claim Evidence Reasoning for participants to experience best practices first hand. Intro Activity: Reflect and share their level of knowledge with CER Explore the CER framework and the importance of each component Guiding Question: How can we deeply incorporate CER throughout an entire concept? Claim What is a claim? Benefits of teaching CER? How do we support students in stating claims? Activity: Make your claim about the guiding question after they explore an engaging phenomena. Observations to Evidence What is evidence? Why is it important? How do we build students' muscles to collect quality evidence? Activity: Explore several examples of evidence and use a rubric to determine the quality of evidence. Reasoning and closing Share criteria for a strong reasoning and how students can differentiate evidence from reasoning Activity: Look through reasoning examples, highlight key components based on the criteria. Close out with a 3-2-1 reflection

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how to improve evidence-based writing skills and communicate scientific knowledge exploring each component of CER. Specifically, how students can construct clear claims, select appropriate evidence to support their claims, and how reasoning ties together claim and evidence.

SPEAKERS:
Brooke Bouldry-Morrison (Standards Alignment Specialist), Anna Meyer (Pickerington Local School District: Pickerington, OH)

eCYBERMISSION STEM Competition - The Power of Phenomenon-Based Learning

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 H


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

eCYBERMISSION is a free online STEM competition for students in grades 6-9 that promotes teamwork, self-discovery, and real-life applications of STEM. The competition’s phenomenon-based learning approach encourages students to investigate challenges in their community while developing critical thinking and problem-solving. We’ll discuss how you can utilize the standards-aligned resources, grants and student awards worth thousands of dollars to engage students. We’ll also form teams to compete in our own mini-eCYBERMISSION competition. You’ll choose a community challenge, develop a plan to explore it and apply STEM concepts throughout the process. The winning team will even walk away with a special prize! This session is aimed at STEM educators who are looking for innovative ways to engage their students. Join us as we discover how eCYBERMISSION can enhance your students' learning experience! eCYBERMISSION is part of the Army Educational Outreach Program and administered by NSTA.

TAKEAWAYS:
eCYBERMISSION is a free, virtual STEM competition for grades 6-9 that is supported by a wealth of standards-aligned resources. Attendees will discover strategies to utilize student-chosen local phenomena as the basis for long-term projects while participating in a rewarding STEM competition.

SPEAKERS:
Carey Dieleman (National Science Teaching Association: No City, No State), Brian Kutsch (National Science Teaching Association, eCYBERMISSION)

The Highs and Lows of the Weather - A Look Into Nor'easters and The Winter Bomb Cyclone

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2105


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The conceptual understanding of the interactions between Earth Systems, particularly the atmosphere and the hydrosphere, allows students to expand their knowledge further of concepts like weather, climate, and climate change. But research (Dove, 1999; Henriques, 2002; Phillips, 1991) shows that teachers and students have a poor understanding of basic weather-related concepts. In this workshop, teachers will be given a 5E lesson incorporating activities that will enable them to better integrate the phenomena of high and low-pressure systems (Disciplinary Core Idea ESS2D) into their curriculum. Besides the 5E lesson, participants will receive additional resources for implementing how these highs and lows interact during the winter to produce Nor'easters and Midwestern Winter Bomb systems. This workshop aims to better prepare those teaching about this important phenomenon in our nation's classrooms.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will be given a 5E lesson incorporating activities that will enable them to integrate better the phenomena of high- and low-pressure systems into their curriculum. Participants will also receive additional resources on incorporating winter weather systems in the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Dannah Schaffer (Minot State University: Minot, ND)

Examining Socio-scientific issues with Historical Primary Sources

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2102 A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Analyzing Historic Primary Sources with a Socio-scientific focus presentation
Analyzing Historic Primary Sources with a Socio-scientific focus presentation
CCC One Pager
How to use primary sources in the science classroom...phenomena and cross cutting concepts focused
Connecting List_Socio-scientific
List of primary sources we used for opening activity, with URLs for free access
Look Before You Eat primary source
Look Before You Eat primary source
Nature of Science One Pager
How to use primary sources in the science classroom...nature of science focus
Primary Source Analysis Tool and Guide
Primary Source Analysis Tool and Guide

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Science does not exist in a vacuum. From environmental policy, to public health issues, to the regulation of food, drugs, and dangerous materials, addressing socio-scientific challenges requires an understanding of both scientific concepts and social contexts. Analyzing historical primary sources from the Library of Congress – including photographs, political cartoons, newspapers, maps and more – can provide students with an opportunity to reflect on this interplay between science and society and offer insights into how citizens and scientists have contributed to social change. The Library has millions of primary sources free online. In this workshop, Library education experts will facilitate hands-on activities using select primary sources and share ways that teachers have used them with students. Participants will leave with concrete strategies for engaging students in primary source analysis to build critical thinking skills and deepen their understanding of socio-scientific issues.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how to access millions of free digitized primary sources and practice hands-on strategies to help students gain critical thinking skills while they reflect on the connections between science, society, and social change through authentic historical examples.

SPEAKERS:
Kelsey Beeghly (Einstein Fellow: Altamonte Springs, FL), Michael Apfeldorf (Library of Congress: Washington, DC)

STOM: Sensemaking by Design

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 G


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

If the ultimate goal is for students to understand from experiences, we must carefully consider our professional practices. While hands-on learning can naturally be engaging for students, the experiences must be carefully woven into the flow of instruction to produce the desired outcomes. An important finding from America’s Lab report is that many students view science as a “false dichotomy,” meaning that students think that the hands-on, “doing” part of science is separate from content (Singer, Hilton, and Schweingruber 2006). As a result, the desired outcomes are for students to discard incorrect ideas, accept the most accurate scientific explanations, and for students to learn the nature by which these scientific explanations are generated. Explore-before-explain teaching allows teachers to meet these goals by providing students with immediate experiences to form accurate understandings; and connecting students’ claims to scientifically accepted explanations.

TAKEAWAYS:
An overview of essential planning considerations covers becoming an “explore-before-explain” teacher and designing lessons that use the assets all students bring to learning science.

SPEAKERS:
Patrick Brown (Fort Zumwalt School District R-II: O'Fallon, MO), Anne Green (Fort Zumwalt School District R-II: OFallon, MO)

Literacy Strategies: Supporting All Students in Sensemaking with Text in Anchored Science by Mi-STAR Units

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Literacy Strategies Handout
Literacy Strategies Slides

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Mi-STAR, now also known outside of Michigan as Anchored Science, is a program at Michigan Technological University dedicated to quality NGSS-aligned curriculum since 2015. We listen carefully to teachers and respond with support. Consistently we’ve heard teachers request materials that will help them promote literacy in their science classrooms. In response, we’ve worked with West Ed's Reading Apprenticeship specialists and classroom teachers to develop both integrated instructional practices and optional reading support materials. Our literacy activities are designed with strategies to promote metacognition and model the text interactions of skilled readers for students of all reading levels. We’d like to share our journey, and also share some examples and templates for teachers to use in their own classrooms. Come see how this approach can promote literacy and equity in science.

TAKEAWAYS:
A selection of Anchored Science by Mi-STAR examples and templates for scaffolded literacy supports will be provided. Use them with your own texts in your classroom next week!

SPEAKERS:
Jenne VandePanne (Michigan Technological University/Newaygo Public Schools: Newaygo, MI), Chris Geerer (Mi-STAR: , MI)

Sensemaking First: Designing Assessments to Elicit 3D Sensemaking

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sensemaking with the three dimensions is the focal construct we want to measure in science assessments - not the phenomenon or problem or the three-dimensions. Making sense of phenomena and/or problems is how students show us they can use the three dimensions to figure out something. This is what we want to assess and how we will really know that students understand the three dimensions. Yet, centering sensemaking in assessment design is difficult and often sensemaking is missing in assessments. Join us for a deep dive into sensemaking and 3D assessment. In this interactive session, participants will engage with exemplary examples of sensemaking in assessment tasks and practice foregrounding sensemaking in assessment design. The resources and processes shared in this session are applicable to K-12 science learning. The session will be interactive.

TAKEAWAYS:
Leave with examples of 3-D sensemaking in assessment tasks and activities for building better assessments that elicit student sensemaking.

SPEAKERS:
Sara Cooper (Contextus), Kelley Turner (Winchester Public Schools: Winchester, VA)

Making Meaningful Connections to Social Emotional Learning Alongside the NGSS

Friday, October 27 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2201


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Since the NGSS, science teachers have been increasingly considering how to effectively engage students during science lessons using science and engineering practices (SEPs). In order to engage in these practices deeply, students need to have effective social and emotional skills. Therefore, embedding social-emotional learning (SEL) can be a tool that teachers use to build a classroom community that deeply engages in the SEPs. This session will engage students in three science activities (one elementary, one middle school, and one high school) that promote 3D learning and SEL. For example, the high school activity will consist of us doing a simulation where participants will act as animals getting "food". We will use it to connect SEL to HS-LS2-8. We will then have participants reflect on SEL teaching strategies such as explicit/reflective SEL questions (Bahnson et al., 2020) in order to demonstrate how to meaningfully embed SEL into 3D NGSS lessons.

TAKEAWAYS:
You will learn strategies to teach SEL in existing NGSS lessons.

SPEAKERS:
Kathryn Borton (Science Teacher: Nevada, IA), Jesse Wilcox (University of Northern Iowa: Cedar Falls, IA)

Tweet! Tweet! Using Social Media Structure & Function to Elevate Instruction

Friday, October 27 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 B


STRAND: Tech Tools

Show Details

Discussion boards and class discussions can tend to become routine, unproductive, and often frustrating to both teachers and students. After participating in a NGSS Twitter Chat, I began to wonder how I could replicate this experience in my course. Using the structure of Twitter and the function of the Twitter Chat, I reimagined facilitation of a class discussion that promoted increased engagement and learning for all my students. Using the stream format in Padlet and intentional questions for reflection, I replaced a typical reading response and class discussion. To my surprise, it was one of my students’ favorite strategies and continues to be each semester. Participants will engage in a Twitter chat simulation to support their understanding of the simulation and how students participate. Directions for creating the Padlet will be demonstrated and participants will have time to design their own Twitter chat simulation padlet and chat questions to use with upcoming content.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will use the structure and function of social media experiences, understand how they can be safely simulated in our classrooms using tools like Padlet, and leave with a Twitter Chat simulation they design around their upcoming content. (No Twitter account needed.) Upper Elem-PostSec.

SPEAKERS:
Beth Pesnell (Kansas State University: Manhattan, KS)

Ways to Structure Student Discussions to Increase Participation and Collaborative Sensemaking

Friday, October 27 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2210


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The session will give teachers an opportunity to participate in the same sort of rich and meaningful learning experiences that are called for by the NGSS. This session, as a result, will include approximately forty minutes of audience participation in student hat. Teachers will leave with high-quality instructional materials that they can use in their own classrooms. The agenda for this session is: • A discussion of characteristics of collaborative sensemaking and productive discussions (5 mins). • A discussion of some of the challenges with promoting and supporting productive discussions where all students participate during a learning experience (10 minutes). • An opportunity for participants to experience an example of productive small group discussion that fosters collaborative sense-making (20 mins). • An opportunity for participants to experience an example of productive whole class discussion (20 mins). • Questions and suggestions for learning more (5 mins).

TAKEAWAYS:
Collaborative sensemaking requires productive and inclusive talk. Teachers can foster productive talk between students using specific activity structures, talk prompts, talk moves, and supports.

SPEAKERS:
Victor Sampson (The University of Texas at Austin: Austin, TX)

An Introduction to Designing Three-Dimensional Assessment Tasks to Support NGSS Teaching and Learning

Friday, October 27 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 C


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

This course is designed to introduce participants to the Next Generation Science Assessment (NGSA) design approach including unpacking dimensions, developing integrated dimension maps, articulating learning performances, identifying phenomena, and designing tasks.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn the steps of a systematic process for designing 3-dimensional tasks that align with NGSS performance expectations, take into consideration students’ diverse backgrounds, and can be used in classrooms to provide information to teachers and students to improve learning.

SPEAKERS:
Joseph Krajcik (CREATE for STEM Institute, Michigan State University: East Lansing, MI), Christopher Harris (WestEd)

AI or Oh My? A ChatGPT workshop that's not artificial!

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2201


STRAND: Tech Tools

Show Details

The NGSS emphasizes practices including: 1) analyzing/interpreting data, 2) constructing explanations, and 3) obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information. Passive learning will not help middle school students practice these skills. But by giving students agency, ChatGPT, and proper scaffolding, teachers can incorporate such practices. This workshop will support teachers as they navigate through a scaffolded learning experience with ChatGPT. Attendees will discover that ChatGPT can be used to offload lower-level thinking skills and advance students into higher order thinking. For example, MS-PS1-3 reads: Gather and make sense of information to describe that synthetic materials come from natural resources and impact society. Students could use ChatGPT to gather the information and then analyze, evaluate, and construct explanations to make sense of the information. After one hour, attendees will have developed an NGSS-aligned activity using ChatGPT that they can confidently use!

TAKEAWAYS:
To be successful with ChatGPT in the science classroom, we need to give students agency. In this workshop, attendees will control their learning. They will develop a valuable idea for using ChatGPT in their class AND witness a fully different way of managing their class…by giving students agency.

SPEAKERS:
Walter Ryan (Retired Educator), Chris Turner (Chief of Staff: Rockaway, NJ), Denise Bressler (Chief Ideologist: Liberty Corner, NJ)

'So a teacher walks into a classroom…' bringing identity and belonging through story to the classroom

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2202


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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During this workshop, the presenters will use improv techniques and connection Jenga to build identity, culture, and story for the classroom. Goals of this presentation are to: -empower individuals to feel they can speak up and contribute by sharing their own stories -engage attendees in an innovative, creative way by building inclusive, interactive bridges through play -ensure a safe environment where people feel comfortable in understanding that everyone has bias -assemble diverse teams who will collaborate to create action plans to share resources back in their districts and states

TAKEAWAYS:
Addressing bias, creating efficacy, and clarifying accessible, diverse, equitable, and inclusive leadership are the primary goals of this workshop.

SPEAKERS:
Kelly Day (Department of Energy: No City, No State), Amy Szczepanski (Einstein Fellow: New York, DC), Melissa Thompson (Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship: No City, No State), Michael Stewart (Stonewall Jackson High School: Manassas, VA), Kelsey Beeghly (Einstein Fellow: Altamonte Springs, FL), Jacquelyn Southerland (Accokeek Academy: Accokeek, MD)

Scaffolding Learning to Engage Diverse Learners in Informational Science Text

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 B


STRAND: Research to Practice

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During this workshop we will present and engage participants in literacy and math-based strategies supported by research that science, mathematics, English language arts, and special education middle school teachers can use scaffold learning to engage in informational science text and argumentation connected to life sciences (e.g., vaping) for diverse learners in their classrooms. By the end of the workshop participants will be able to: 1. Define content and instructional scaffolding and how these types of scaffolds can be used to structure learning experiences to engage diverse learners in making meaningful sense of informational text. 2. Identify literacy- and math-based strategies that connect to content and instructional scaffolds that are designed to structure meaningful learning experiences to engage diverse learners in informational text. 3. Implement strategies within their content instruction that will scaffold learning to engage their diverse learners in informational text.

TAKEAWAYS:
All learners, including diverse learners, with the right instructional scaffolds can meaningfully engage in complex informational science text.

SPEAKERS:
TARA GREEN (student: , MO), William Folk (University of Missouri: Columbia, MO), Amy Lannin (University of Missouri: Columbia, MO), Cassandra Smith (University of Missouri: Columbia, MO), Delinda Van Garderen (University of Missouri: Columbia, MO)

Leverage Real-World & Daily Data to Engage Learners

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2202



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Shared resource document

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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There is an explosion of data all around us to teach our science standards. But can we use them to help our students struggle less with data? Yes! Come unpack “Analyzing & Interpreting Data” in ways that invite all learners into the discussion. We will explore strategies for finding high-quality datasets and discuss different approaches to integrate real-time data into our teaching to better build data skills. We will discuss how to foster science learning for all students. These short practice sessions that are low-floor-high-ceiling have powerful returns-on-investment in terms of building students' confidence and competence with data skills. We will discuss what this could mean for our teaching. Participants will increase their toolkit of strategies to use data to enhance their current 6-12th grade instruction. Let’s leverage all this data around us to best prepare our learners for the 21st century of data!

TAKEAWAYS:
Identify ways to integrate low-floor-high-ceiling data activities using real-world data into existing curriculum to build data skills, engage learners, and teach your science.

SPEAKERS:
Kristin Hunter-Thomson (Dataspire Education & Evaluation, LLC)

Engaging in Argumentation from Evidence in the Middle School Realm

Saturday, October 28 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2207


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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What does rich student discourse look like in a middle school science classroom? How can spirited debates over scientific principles erupt from prepubescent teens? I found myself skeptical when my colleague first brought the PEER Physics curriculum to my attention. How could a curriculum that was initially designed for undergraduate non-science majors and was revised to be applicable for high school contexts, possibly work in middle school? But I found that it not only “worked”, students thrived. I had longed for my students to authentically engage in science practices. In this workshop, I’ll share my experience with bringing PEER Physics into middle school. I’ll invite you into examples of middle school discourse by showing video and student reflections. Workshop participants will consider norming strategies that can support students in rich discourse in middle school science courses. And see how the three-dimensional learning from PEER changed the rest of my instruction.

TAKEAWAYS:
Through video examples and hands-on learning, participants will see what evidence-based student discourse looks like at the middle school level. They will also walk away with tangible strategies, having experienced some of these strategies themselves.

SPEAKERS:
Daniela Del Cid (8th grade Science teacher: Thornton, CO)

Implementing ELL Strategies in Science

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2208


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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During this presentation topics such as creating language objectives, color-coding vocabulary, using graphic organizers to help further comprehension of content, and using the expert readers strategy will be covered.

TAKEAWAYS:
Various strategies for scientific literacy that are easily applicable to any science classroom such as using language objectives, graphic organizers, and color-coding key vocabulary.

SPEAKERS:
Mikayla Kagey (Central Kitsap Middle School: Silverdale, WA), Sydnie Chouery (Science Teacher: Silverdale, WA)

Building Insights Through Observation – Integrating Science and Art to Support Data Literacy

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 B


STRAND: STEM Haven

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Data is an increasingly prevalent resource for addressing real-world challenges, however, the transdisciplinary skills needed to interpret and think critically about data are lacking in the public. Geospatial data visualizations are tools used to transform large datasets into representations that support learning, but our understanding of how to effectively use them in instruction is under-studied. To support data literacy, a new model for teaching with data visualizations in middle school science uses arts-based instructional approaches including visual thinking skills that apply in both science and art. The model helps teachers develop greater comfort with data visualizations, understand arts-based pedagogies that support close observation and critical thinking, and integrate these approaches in their curricula, resulting in students’ data literacy skills gains. Workshop attendees will experience the program as students and reflect on how the approach supports teaching and learning.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will experience a new model for exploring geospatial data using arts-based instructional approaches for learning about earth science and learn how this transdisciplinary approach supports teachers and students in improving data literacy.

SPEAKERS:
Kathryn Semmens (Science Director: Easton, PA)

Supporting English Language Learners in the Science Classroom

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2210


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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I would like to introduce and allow teachers to interact with strategies that I have used while teaching at a school that consists of at least 70% English Language Learners (ELLs). I have worked to compile strategies that support students' language development in all four language domains and in all science content areas. For developing reading, I have used stations with multiple means of representation, as well as interactive visual vocabulary activities to frontload vocabulary prior to reading a science text. For listening, I have used videos with pause points for comprehension checks, as well as note-taking while listening, to practice active listening. For writing, I have used sentence frames, single point rubrics, and visual vocabulary word banks to support student writing. For speaking, I have used questioning strategies, as well as organized systems, for student participation. These strategies have positively impacted language and content acquisition in my classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
Strategies and supports that can be easily implemented in your classroom tomorrow no matter the lesson, content, or activity.

SPEAKERS:
Celeste Pistole (Guadalupe Centers Middle School: Kansas City, MO)

Nature Meditation IRL (In Real Life)

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2201


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There is a strong need in the post (ish) COVID world, to help overworked, under supported teachers find the mental clarity needed to be the creative, innovative, and caring teachers we need to develop the future STEM minds of the future. As a certified nature therapy guide and long time NSTA presenter, I would love to bring this practice to the NSTA community. Participants will meet in the room and listen to a short overview of nature therapy and its roots in Shinrin-yoku. We will walk outside - encouraged to notice what is moving slowly as we walk through the busy conference. Once we are outside, I will lead in a land acknowledgement and sensory meditation. Participants will be given a chance to share what they noticed in a sharing circle. We will walk to the next locations and engage in more invitations / sharing circles. The invitations will be finalized once I am on site and connect with the land for inspiration.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn about the practice of nature therapy and its roots in the Japanese practice Shinrin-yoku which is widely researched for its health benefits.

SPEAKERS:
Gina Tesoriero (Student / Educator / Researcher / Healer: Saratoga, CA)

Can You Grow Food in a Bottle? Abiotic & Biotic Interactions in Food Ecosystems

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Session ID #39625 Sense Making Strand Can You Grow Food in a Bottle?
Can You Grow Food in a Bottle? Abiotic & Biotic Interactions in Food Ecosystems. Sure!! Using alternative food systems to understand the abiotic and biotic interactions.

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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Session participants explore matter-energy ecosystem transfer phenomena by modeling alternative food production & creating design plans/systems to grow food with minimal materials. The phenomena of energy & matter transfers is abstract; yet, as part of ecosystem services, provides for many student-led investigations and design solutions to improve life, such as food production. In MS LS2-3, students develop a model to describe the cycling of matter and flow of energy among living and nonliving parts of an ecosystem. If we take this a step further, students would create functional models of alternative food growth while demonstrating minimal to no impact on the ecosystem. Session participants will explore the idea of alternative food production and create design plans (and possible functioning systems) to grow food with minimal materials. The intent is to provide session participants with realistic, functional modeling to increase student understanding & ability to synthesize the content.

TAKEAWAYS:
The energy-matter transfer phenomena is crucial in ecosystems. Creating functional ecosystem models leads to understanding ecosystem interactions and services such as food production. We can mimic nature to provide sustainable food supplies with less impact to natural environments.

SPEAKERS:
Sue Meggers (Interstate 35 Community School District: Truro, IA)

When a Knot Is Not a Knot: Excursions in Topology

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Folder for presentation, references, welcome for When a Knot is Not a Knot
Presentation (pdf) When a Knot is Not a Knot

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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Disentanglement puzzles, string figures, rope tricks, magic knots, and other curious objects offer interest for students. Such physical riddles yield engaging, entertaining, instructive, and enlightening opportunities for students. Topology applies to a range of sciences; students can investigate empirically and safely. Advanced math is not needed to search for solutions and to describe procedures/results through language and visualisation. There are occasions for communication, collaboration, and creative problem solving. There are cross-curricular connections abound from cultural anthropology to visual arts. Experience with these puzzles and problems helps develop spatial thinking and gives practice in pattern-finding, hypothesis-testing, and scientific inference. We will construct puzzles to take home, try solving such puzzles and problems, practice describing and systematising solutions, and present/discuss a number of activities for students. NGSS relevance will be discussed and references will be shared.

TAKEAWAYS:
Topology offers rich, diverse, and perhaps surprising opportunities for science learning through practices, core ideas, and cross-cutting concepts. Applicable phenomena, relevant scientific approaches, and rewarding occasions for finding patterns and testing hypotheses emerge.

SPEAKERS:
Richard Frazier (retired)

Visualizing the Sun-Moon-Earth System

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2210


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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Science teachers can use visual data strategies to help students come to understand what they are seeing, as well as pick out how those representations differ from reality. Strategies such as teacher modeling, questions, and small group work (McTigue & Coleman, 2013) help direct students’ attention to graphics and help them make sense of them. In this presentation, we will engage students in middle school space science lessons about eclipses, seasons, and moon phases (partially addressing MS-ESS1-1). We will use visual data throughout the 5E, along with teaching strategies, to show participants how we help our students move towards a more complete understanding of eclipses, seasons, and moon phases. We have found that by focusing on teaching students through and about visual data, they are better able to think critically about the content and the way the content is represented. We will discuss specific strategies on how to include visual data and how to help students make sense of that data.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will have examples and strategies to engage students with visual data.

SPEAKERS:
Jesse Wilcox (University of Northern Iowa: Cedar Falls, IA)

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