2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

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Rooms and times subject to change.
58 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

I can't wait for science class! - The How and Why of 3D Phenomenon-Based Learning

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 H


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

In pre-NGSS approaches to science teaching, units were often sequenced based on how experts understand the relationship among concepts. This means that it typically requires an understanding of the concepts being taught to understand why a unit is sequenced the way it is. The result is that the sequence of activities may make sense to a teacher, but doesn’t necessarily make sense to the students. The shift to phenomena-based 3D learning brings the student to the center of the learning and uses their life experiences and approaches to sensemaking to drive the learning. This session will highlight how powerful this shift is for student ownership of learning and general engagement. Additionally, we will describe HOW to make this a reality in classrooms and provide participants with resources and supports to bring this learning to life in their classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
The shift to phenomena-based 3D learning brings the student to the center of the learning and uses their life experiences and approaches to sensemaking to drive the learning forward.

SPEAKERS:
Matt Krehbiel (OpenSciEd: New York, NY)

Engaging Young Investigators in Sensemaking: How Does the Project Approach Fit into the Pillars of Sensemaking in PreK-2?

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2208



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
New Vision for Science Education.pdf
Research on Project Work NAEYC 23 Project Catalog FINAL (1).docx
List of resources for learning more about the Project Approach and Sensemaking
Sensemaking note sheet .pdf
Sensemaking attributes

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Explore how the Project Approach is effective for increasing authentic sensemaking experiences in PreK-2 settings. Grounded in classical procedures of science, the Project Approach builds a foundation for science learning. A project, or long-term investigation, begins with children’s questions about the phenomena of interest, proceeds to cycles of predictions and data collection, and concludes with representation of learning. Projects provide rich opportunities for discipline integration, optimizing learning for young children through integrated curricula. Project work assists teachers in building on children’s innate abilities and curiosity about phenomena that they find intensely interesting, such as worms seen on sidewalks after it rains. Participants will identify key project phases, how to use planning tools for topic selection, and intentionally teach through standard integration. Participants will examine documentation of project work including photos and children’s questions.

TAKEAWAYS:
Examine classroom documentation to evaluate alignment between NGSS sensemaking pillars and the Project Approach components, such as how to select topics for investigation; gather children’s questions; and support young scientists to plan, investigate, collect data, and communicate their learning.

SPEAKERS:
Karrie Snider (Associate Professor: Lee's Summit, MO), Rebecca Wilson (Van Meter Community School District: Van Meter, IA)

Claim, Evidence, Reasoning: Often Misunderstood But Inherently Valuable

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2203


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The claim, evidence, reasoning method is a well-researched and effective tool in helping students engage in argumentation. However, in our work with teachers, we find that the method is often not well understood or implemented. In practice, especially in elementary classrooms, teachers are using claim to replace the word hypothesis, leading to the incorrect use of the method. Teachers are also starting by having students make a claim and then evaluating the evidence shown as to provide reasoning. A better way of using the method is to evaluate the evidence, then make a claim, and finally use reasoning to support the claim. We want to help teachers understand the research and how to use the method in their classrooms. Once the background is understood, the teachers will practice the method themselves by gathering evidence from the provided visualizations, writing a claim based on the evidence, and using the evidence along with their own background knowledge as their reasoning.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn where and how to use the claim, evidence, reasoning method and practice using it to make their own reasoned claims based on evidence.

SPEAKERS:
Susan Licher (Cornell Lab of Ornithology: Ithaca, NY)

What is OpenSciEd HS? What are the premises of our instructional model?

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 C


STRAND: Leadership and Advocacy

Show Details

Join us to see how OpenSciEd’s materials can help build science learning experiences anchored in compelling phenomena and in important community and global problems. OpenSciEd high school uses a storyline approach that emphasizes coherence from the student perspective. Participants will explore the curricular routines, discourse strategies, and comprehensive assessment system that support equitable participation

TAKEAWAYS:
OpenSciEd HS's storyline approach, curricular routines, student discourse strategies, and assessment systems work together to help students build equitable science learning experiences.

SPEAKERS:
Zoe Buck Bracey (Senior Science Educator and Director of Design for Justice: Colorado Springs, CO), Michael Novak (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Kate Henson (University of Colorado Boulder: Boulder, CO)

Speaking Like a Scientist Leads to Reading and Writing Like a Scientist!

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2209


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

It's difficult for educators at the primary level to imagine creating “additional time” for science, but when we understand strong language skills provide greater success in reading and writing, we see that science isn't just "one more thing." Science and critical thinking creates opportunities for students to have authentic conversations–which allows us to guide student language in a way that's unmatched! We will include a brief review of SEPs, standards for spoken/written language, and examples for using NGSS DCIs to facilitate student conversations. Ideas for explicitly teaching conversational language skills and behaviors will be shared. Participants will learn ways to combine the use of guided student language and current best practices in literacy instruction along with other ideas that can be used immediately. The session will end with participants developing plans for scientific conversations in their own classrooms, and ideas for how they might guide & build student language.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will be provided with ideas for engaging students in scientific conversations, ideas for guiding student language within those conversations, and ideas for using language to facilitate literacy instruction.

SPEAKERS:
Paige Garrett (Teacher: Nixa, MO), Courtney Mills (John Thomas School of Discovery Partner School: Nixa, MO), Shannon Winkler (John Thomas School of Discovery Partner School: Nixa, MO)

Sensemaking and the Crosscutting Concepts Conference Course Kick-Off

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 B


Show Details

This is session 1 of 4 in the PL Committee CCCs conference course. It is designed to support K-12. This session is an opportunity for members of NSTA's PL Committee to recruit and connect with fellow NSTA members. Attendees will be introduced to topics included in the conference course highlighting how CCCs are used as tools in service of DCIs and SEPs, student sensemaking, and assessment of CCCs to guide further instruction. Using the Framework progression documents and STEM Teaching Tools, attendees will have the opportunity to collaborate with fellow participants to uncover vertical progressions of CCCs and have tools to use within the classroom to elicit student sensemaking. The PL Committee will utilize research from Jeffery Nordine and Okhee Lee's book, "Crosscutting Concepts: Strengthening Science and Engineering Learning," to ignite the call to action for realizing the power of CCCs.

TAKEAWAYS:
This session is a call to action for realizing the power of CCCs. Attendees will have an opportunity to connect with NSTA's PL Committee, collaborate with fellow science leaders, and leave with an invitation to continue the conference course to further understandings of sensemaking and CCCs.

SPEAKERS:
Rebecca Abbott (The Lawrence Hall of Science: Berkeley, CA), Kimberley Astle (Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction: Olympia, WA), Sharon Cates (Phenomenon Science Education: Amherst, MA), Zoe Evans (Bremen City Schools: Bremen, GA), Leah Litz (Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo & Aquarium: No City, No State)

“AUTHOR” Activating Students' Ideas! Linking Formative Assessment to Instructional Sequence

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 C


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Activating Students' Ideas! is a one-stop professional learning experience that will inspire you to reimagine how you teach. This session discusses how two popular teaching resources can be used in tandem: (1) Uncovering Student Ideas formative assessment probes and (2) Explore-before-explain teaching. We show how simple shifts in arranging and combining activities help students construct knowledge while allowing you to put the three dimensions of the K-12 Science Education Frameworks into practice. The session includes: (1) A concise review of research on why the order in which you structure your lessons is so critical; (2) The critical planning considerations for becoming an “explore-before-explain” teacher; (3) Ready-to-teach lessons that use science phenomena as a hook to provide an interdisciplinary learning experience; and (4) Reflection questions will spark thinking throughout the sequencing process and help you develop the knowledge to adapt these concepts to you

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn about a resource for formative assessment and explore-before-explain teaching.

SPEAKERS:
Patrick Brown (Fort Zumwalt School District R-II: O'Fallon, MO)

Selection Pressures and Urban Spaces: A Storyline Approach in OpenSciEd Biology

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Basie Ballroom A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

This unit helps students develop an understanding of the elements of evolution by natural selection and learn to apply that understanding to protect populations endangered by urbanization. Students learn through modeling, reading and discussing adaptations of published scientific studies of nonhuman populations impacted by urbanization. They develop criteria for designing urban systems that protect populations from the harmful effects of fragmentation in urban systems and evaluate proposals for development in a real US city.

TAKEAWAYS:
Leave motivated to use OpenSciEd’s storyline to teach the elements of evolution by natural selection using real-world examples. Students will learn how their understanding of biological concepts can be used to design more sustainable systems that benefit the human and more-than human world.

SPEAKERS:
Sara Krauskopf (University of Colorado-Boulder: No City, No State), Wayne Wright (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Kate Henson (University of Colorado Boulder: Boulder, CO)

Moonflower Magic: Inclusive Argumentation in the Elementary Classroom

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2210


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Participants will discover how argumentation can support the vision of inclusive instructional strategies across the curriculum. This session will anchor in learning theory and focus on student work examples, including graphic organizers and transcripts, that tell the story of an instructional sequence about pollinators. How the routines of science support learning for literacy and math will be investigated and made explicit. We’ll pull apart the underlying instructional practices evident in the student work for how to plan for engagement, elicit student ideas, support changes in student ideas, and press for complete explanations through argumentation.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will come away with an example of how to structure argumentation in the 4th grade classroom through observing student data organization and student discourse.

SPEAKERS:
Lindsey Roy (Science and Digital Learning Coordinator: Lincoln, NE), Miranda Orellana (Elementary Teacher: Lincoln, NE), Betsy Barent (Lincoln Public Schools: No City, No State)

Creating a Sustainably Integrated Pedagogy Using STEM, Social Studies, and ELA

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2209



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA 2023_ Creating a Sustainably Integrated Pedagogy.pdf

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

According to recent studies, teaching elementary reading, writing, and math in isolation is not the most effective way for students to learn. We will show how it is possible to develop integrated learning opportunities using all of the subjects in the elementary school day-- building strong connections within young students' brains. Such rich and impactful experiences in student learning enhances the likelihood for students to make lasting connections with what they're learning every day. The Framework for K-12 Science in Education in conjunction with the NCSS C3 Framework is our basis for designing lessons and units. Presenters will model and help teachers brainstorm robust, integrated lessons with STEM, ELA, and social studies to improve student understanding in all subject areas as they gather, reason, and communicate connections in problem-solving STEM activities, fiction, informational text, writing, and simulated learning experiences– all capable of supporting each other.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn the connections between NGSS, NCSS, and CCSS and the impact they can have on student learning with mindful integration of these subjects. Using a template to guide their planning, attendees will begin to practice integrating lesson/unit plans based on their own core requirements.

SPEAKERS:
Deborah Draper (Cedar Ridge Elementary School: Cedar Hills, UT), Julie Siebach (Retired Teacher: Cedar Hills, UT)

Next Gen Standards for Next Gen Students: Supporting the Teacher as the Designer of Science Instruction

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Truman A


STRAND: Leadership and Advocacy

Show Details

Supporting the teacher as the “designer” of science instruction is essential to cultivating a learning environment in the science classroom that leverages sense-making. Participants will learn about “look for’s” for high quality instruction, their implications for evaluation and the value of giving teachers both confidence and inspiration to innovate.

TAKEAWAYS:
Administrators will learn practical ways to support teachers in shifting instructional practices that support the demands of the NGSS.

SPEAKERS:
Zoe Evans (Bremen City Schools: Bremen, GA), Michael Fumagalli (Assistant Director of Teaching & Learning: Glen Ellyn, IL)

Creating Chemistry Storylines Using Digital Interactive Notebooks

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Basie Ballroom C



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Creating Chemistry Storylines using Digital Interactive Notebooks.pdf
NSTA 2023 Phenomenon Based Ionic Bonding DICNB 2023 - 2024

STRAND: Tech Tools

Show Details

Over the last few years, access to digital resources to capture student understanding of chemistry concepts has greatly increased. This technological shift, along with a focus on the use of storylines to engage students in chemistry, provides an opportunity to implement digital interactive notebooks. Through the use of various on-line platforms, student beliefs and understanding can be documented and tracked over the course of a storyline. Digital notebooking is a dynamic process that integrates different learning experiences to challenge and reinforce student understanding. This method actively engages students in a manner that encourages discussion and collaboration. Support is built into the digital notebook for absent students and those that need additional resources to understand a concept. This session provides an overview of the digital interactive notebook creation, along with guidance for educators to take this process and use phenomena relevant to their students.

TAKEAWAYS:
This session will provide a brief overview of how I use digital interactive notebooks in my classroom, along with guidance on how educators can begin the process of building their own. Resources and editable chemistry notebooks will be shared that focus on different chemistry phenomena.

SPEAKERS:
Sarah English (Sweet Home High School: Amherst, NY)

How to Use EdReports to Select High-Quality Instructional Materials (Grades K-12)

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 E



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA_Selecting HQ NGSS-Aligned K-12 IM.pdf

STRAND: Leadership and Advocacy

Show Details

In this session, participants will learn about the characteristics of high-quality instructional materials, and how to use EdReports’ reports to identify these characteristics in a curriculum adoption process. Participants will participate in a mock materials adoption where they will learn how to use EdReports’ resources to identify priorities and compare and contrast sample programs around the identified criteria. Through this process participants will learn how to effectively read and leverage EdReports reports and how to begin to narrow materials selection through a critical lens, through guided practice and discussion. Finally, we will orient participants to EdReports' complete reviews of instructional materials, existing adoption and selection tools, as well as other resources for making materials selections for their school or classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
Through engaging in a sample materials selection process, participants will gain an understanding of the characteristics of high-quality instructional materials and how to use EdReports' free resources.

SPEAKERS:
Teresa Eliopoulos (EdReports.org: Alexandria, VA), Sam Shaw (EdReports.org)

Using the NSTA Sensemaking Tool to Evaluate Lessons for Sensemaking - Secondary

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 C



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Demystifying the Practice of Using Mathematics and Computational
Kansas City 2023 Elementary and Secondary Sessions

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The NSTA Sensemaking Tool (adapted from the research-based NGSS Lesson Screener) is designed to help educators be critical consumers of curricular materials as well as create and/or revise science lessons to reflect the instructional shifts required by new standards (sensemaking). Join us to gain experience using the tool and facilitating criteria-based consensus conversations with colleagues.

TAKEAWAYS:
Recognize the critical aspects of sensemaking in a science lesson.

SPEAKERS:
Emily Mathews (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Holly Hereau (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Kate Soriano (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Learning to be an Ambitious Science Teacher

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2105


STRAND: Leadership and Advocacy

Show Details

In order for teachers to support the three-dimensional learning of their students, they need high-quality professional learning (PL). This presentation outlines a PL approach that focuses on Ambitious Science Teaching (Windschitl, M. Thompson, J., & Braaten, M., 2018) as an approach to support teacher and student three-dimensional science learning. The PL model includes 4 PL sessions followed by 3 action periods to “try-on” strategies in their classrooms. During the PL sessions teachers experienced ambitious strategies as learners, connected theory to practice, collaborated meaningfully with colleagues, and reflected on their implementation of strategies. The sessions led to a change in teacher practice that was evident through the artifacts they collected. Teachers also made cross-curricular connections with many of the introduced strategies. This presentation provides suggestions for supporting teachers in implementing ambitious science teaching strategies.

TAKEAWAYS:
The audience will walk away with a model for high-quality professional learning for teachers that supports student growth in three-dimensional science learning. The model can be implemented at the school, district, or cross-district level.

SPEAKERS:
Heather Milo (Washington University in St. Louis: St. Louis, MO), Alex Gerber (Instructional Specialist: University City, MO)

School and District Leaders: Learn About NSTA Professional Learning Opportunities for Groups of Teachers

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 G



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA-National-Conference-KC-10-26-2023-Admin-Final.pdf

STRAND: Leadership and Advocacy

Show Details

School and district leaders will learn about the variety of professional learning opportunities that NSTA offers, delivered in-person, online, and blended, that give their teachers the power to personalize their learning as well as the ability to learn with their peers. Presenters will share how to utilize NSTA's online learning resources to support in-person professional learning experiences. A few case-studies will be presented representative of different professional learning options available, including coaching, in-person workshops, online book studies, and district/school partnerships.

TAKEAWAYS:
School and district leaders will learn about the variety of professional learning opportunities that NSTA offers, delivered in-person, online, and blended, that give their teachers the power to personalize their learning as well as the ability to learn with their peers.

SPEAKERS:
Flavio Mendez (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Elevate the Innovator : Inspiring Teachers in the Shift to 3-Dimensional Learning

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Truman A


STRAND: Leadership and Advocacy

Show Details

This session will help administrators to answer: What should I see and not see in a 3-dimensional science classroom? How do I provide effective feedback to the teacher? How do I support instructional innovation as an instructional leader?

TAKEAWAYS:
Administrators will feel empowered to lead science instruction in their schools, even without a science background.

SPEAKERS:
Michael Fumagalli (Assistant Director of Teaching & Learning: Glen Ellyn, IL)

Turn Up the Discussion - Increasing the Quality and Quantity of Discussion in the Science Classroom

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 H


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The negotiation and construction of scientific ideas through talk is a central part of the science learning described in the Framework for K-12 Science. Discussion is the glue that connects science and engineering practices to one another, and it connects those practices to disciplinary core ideas and cross-cutting concepts. But just because it is a key part of the vision, making it a reality in the classroom isn't always easy. In this session, we will dig into the types of discussions and approaches for ensuring they are equitable and meaningful. We will share planning tools, and teaching moves that will support science discussion. Participants will engage in discussion, analyze classroom videos and plan for how they may implement aspects in their own classrooms.

TAKEAWAYS:
Discussion is the way that a classroom community makes sense of what it is investigating, and there are tools and approaches that teachers can use to ensure that all students have access to this sensemaking.

SPEAKERS:
Matt Krehbiel (OpenSciEd: New York, NY)

Johns Hopkins Wavelengths Lessons: Connecting Secondary Students to Cutting Edge Science

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 C


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

This session will introduce participants to a lesson designed to introduce high school students to cutting-edge research on planetary science. The lesson is designed around the critical aspects of sensemaking: students experience a phenomenon, engage in science and engineering practices, and share ideas to build and/or apply disciplinary core ideas and crosscutting concepts needed to explain how or why the phenomenon occurs. Sensemaking is in the vision of A Framework for K-12 Science Education -- “the doing of science and engineering is highlighted as a strategy that can capture students’ interest in science and motivate their continued study.” (A Framework for K-12 Science Education, pp 42-43). JHU Wavelengths lessons co-designed by NSTA and Johns Hopkins University provide opportunities for all students to engage in science learning that is meaningful to them.

TAKEAWAYS:
The Johns Hopkins Wavelengths lesson introduced in the session provides opportunities for secondary students to learn about cutting-edge planetary science research and figure out science ideas related to earth and space science, and physical science.

SPEAKERS:
Patrice Scinta (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Using Modeling to Support Chemistry Storylines

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Basie Ballroom C


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Models engage students, promote critical thinking, and help students connect abstract concepts to real-world phenomena. This session will promote using the science and engineering practice of developing and using models as a technique to explore concepts, promote sense making, and demonstrate student understanding. Presenters will include modeling techniques that have been successfully used in both rural and urban chemistry classrooms to help students better understand complex concepts within storyline units. The use of simulations, hands-on activities, physical manipulatives, drawings, and technology will be demonstrated. The benefits of models used as an equitable tool will be examined using student data and examples. Sample chemistry storylines will be used to show how student coherence builds throughout the unit with the use of models. Strategies for teachers will be provided to help students develop better models, and a discussion of formative assessment value will be stressed.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will leave with various modeling strategies to implement into their chemistry courses. This will promote student sensemaking and more equitable evaluations of student ideas.

SPEAKERS:
Jennifer Jones (Ogallala High School: Ogallala, NE), Christine Gustafson (Millard South High School: Omaha, NE)

Authentic Literacy and Language (ALL) for Science: Reading, Writing, and Thinking Like a Scientist!

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2202


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Participants will explore the Authentic Literacy and Language (ALL) for Science curriculum framework and discover how the combination of guided science investigations, mini-lessons on science-based disciplinary literacy, and science inquiry circles can increase learner performance. They will receive and be guided through a sample lesson and a template they can use to develop their own lessons using this framework. Teachers who used lessons using this curriculum framework reported that children demonstrated increased engagement with lessons and improved their language skills as they began to read, write, and think like scientists. They also found that children performed better overall on assessments of science concepts, attributing the use of collaborative learning teams that build a community of science practice as a factor. Participants will receive access to the ALL for Science website where they can download FREE curriculum resources aligned with NGSS standards.

TAKEAWAYS:
Educators will explore how they can create their own lessons unifying science investigations with science-specific disciplinary literacy using the ALLS framework to engage learners in the practices of science. Participants will receive the framework template and access to free resources.

SPEAKERS:
Jimmie Thomas (Baylor College of Medicine)

Assessment of Sensemaking Through the Crosscutting Concepts

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 B


Show Details

The crosscutting concepts provide a consistent language for student communication. When teachers’ assessment prompts are designed with the crosscutting concepts, the focus of student thinking can be directed to key aspects of the phenomenon or, the system being investigated. Patterns may be used as evidence to support explanations or arguments for the causes of a phenomenon. Participants will explore the progression of Crosscutting Concepts throughout a student’s K-12 career. They will consider phenomenon and discuss several appropriate prompts that bring different CCCs to the forefront (patterns, scale, systems). Participants will review and evaluate sample prompts and responses which employ different crosscutting concepts.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will leave with resources that guide their development and use of Crosscutting Concepts to focus student sensemaking on assessments. These can be integrated with assessment prompts which are aligned to Science and Engineering Practices and Disciplinary Core Ideas.

SPEAKERS:
Rebecca Abbott (The Lawrence Hall of Science: Berkeley, CA), Sharon Cates (Phenomenon Science Education: Amherst, MA), Leah Litz (Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo & Aquarium: No City, No State)

What are the NGSS Really Asking? Lessons Learned From the Classroom, District, and State Levels As We Figure It Out!

Friday, October 27 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 B


STRAND: Leadership and Advocacy

Show Details

The three presenters: a classroom teacher, a district science coordinator, and a state science supervisor, will share the different roles and perspectives we each hold in Kansas science education and how that has shaped our different paths to understanding NGSS through collaborative work with each other over the last 6+ years. We will highlight multiple resources that have helped our understanding and implementation of the NGSS in various contexts. During this session, resources will include: unpacking tools, administrative book studies, PLC guidance, and recommendations for how tools might be modified while maintaining integrity of the standards in different contexts.

TAKEAWAYS:
The session will provide resources to collaborate with various stakeholders to improve capacity and efficacy with the NGSS. We will share processes for how we have unpacked the science standards which resulted in better understanding of classroom practices, instruction, & assessment across Kansas.

SPEAKERS:
Meg Richard (Kansas Department of Education: , KS), Stephanie Alderman-Oler (Washington High School: Kansas City, KS), Spencer Martin (Kansas City Kansas Public Schools: Kansas City, KS)

Engaging Students Through Sensemaking Discussions in Middle School Science

Friday, October 27 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2207



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1t4mU686fREgY9yRUF7S6btUWrHb6tjt-XNLg6URENYc/edit?usp=sharing

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Research shows that when students are typically engaged in science class discussions, the teacher asks a question, one student responds, the teacher gives feedback, and the cycle continues. The teacher then only knows about the understanding of science of one student. But what are the other students able to make sense of? This presentation will share with attendees research that was conducted through a dissertation, explicitly looking at talk moves developed by Sarah Michaels and Cathy O'Connor, and how they increased engagement with female students. This presentation will also provide teachers with these talk moves, and tips and tricks on how they can be used in a middle school science classroom, and how they better help students make sense of science phenomena.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will takeaway with tips and tricks that will get middle school students engaging in sensemaking discussions. Teachers will be provided with a set of talk moves that can be implemented Monday with students!

SPEAKERS:
Betsy Lawrence (Summit Trail Middle School: Olathe, KS)

CONSTRUCTing Effective Assessment Questions Using the NGSS DCIs

Friday, October 27 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2205



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA-KC 2023, CONSTRUCT presentation, NSTA upload.pptx

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Using the Disciplinary Core Ideas and a research-based “citizen science” approach, science educators contributed their own test items, and also helped to revise existing test items in order to address crucial issues such as difficulty, gender, and racial/ethnic bias that were present in the item analysis characteristics. We share the analysis and results of these efforts so that educators can assess their own test items to be more inclusive of all students understandings in one of the dimensions of the 3-D approach to learning. Learn what changes contributed to improvement of the item as well as what types of changes or revisions made the item worse than before. We also share results of field testing of these items in student classrooms and discuss the importance of incorporating students’ misconceptions into the response choices to capture their true understanding of science concepts as outlined in the DCIs.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn to evaluate assessment questions that you use to assess students’ sensemaking of elements outlined in the NGSS DCIs. Are the questions free of bias, not too difficult, indicative of overall student performance? Do they include common misconceptions that students hold? Access a free resource.

SPEAKERS:
Cynthia Crockett (Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian: Cambridge, MA)

Alternative Approaches to (Pre)Assessment

Friday, October 27 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2206


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

In this session, participants will consider three alternatives to traditional multiple-choice pre-assessments: modeling, self-documentation, and class discussions. We will discuss the purpose of pre-assessments as a critical data point for instructional planning, especially with many schools moving towards PLC structures around data cycles. We will see examples of these three alternative strategies for pre-assessment (which can also be used as formative assessment structures). For each assessment structure, we will discuss how to collect and use data. Authentic examples will be provided from the presenter’s middle school and high school classrooms.The session will synthesize and apply ideas from the following ACESSE Stem Teaching Tools: Modeling #8 / self-documentation #31 / class discussions #6, #35 / using pre-assessments #15, #18, #25, #34, #37. These STEM teaching tools will be shared with participants to continue their learning beyond the 60-minute session.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how to use different assessment formats to collect data without relying on multiple-choice questions. The assessment formats allow students to use knowledge & experiences of a phenomenon or science idea while providing meaningful information to guide instructional choices.

SPEAKERS:
Stephanie Alderman-Oler (Washington High School: Kansas City, KS)

What is it like to teach with OpenSciEd High School? A teachers' panel discussion

Friday, October 27 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 H



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
What is it like to teach with OpenSciEd High School A teachers' panel discussion-1.pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Building classroom culture is essential for students to collectively make sense of phenomena. Students need to buy into the idea that each of their ideas is crucial for pushing the class forward. In this session, we highlight strategies for co-creating community agreements. We also report on challenges we have encountered in our classrooms, which strategies we have found to be successful, and which tend to turn students off. We highlight how, as culture challenges arise throughout the year, we can return to these community agreements to reground our classroom. The facilitator will begin the session with a brief overview of OpenSciEd’s view of the teacher's role in instruction and community-building, which will then be followed with a guided panel featuring experienced teachers in using storylines, and finally open Q&A.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will understand how community agreements and other strategies are used in OpenSciEd and other high school classrooms to support collective and equitable sensemaking.

SPEAKERS:
Dan Voss (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Kerri Wingert (Good Question Research: Boulder, CO), Rachel Patton (Denver Public Schools), Nina Blanton (Educator: , MO), Calvin Atkins (Bellingham High School: Bellingham, WA), Sarah Evans (Olathe South High School: Olathe, KS)

Hooking Key Scientific Concepts for Below-Proficient Readers Using Anchor Texts

Friday, October 27 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2207


STRAND: Research to Practice

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In the first part, participants will gain an understanding of how anchor texts are connected to science and engineering practices -- what students do using student work samples and sample anchor texts. First, we will explore the use of concept loading in scientific complex texts through a discussion, examples, and video. We will look at how scientific texts are organized to communicate key ideas through concept loading using text/visual features and text structures such as direct definition context clues through a group discussion. In groups, teachers will dissect a given text to develop a think-aloud to explicitly teach scientific key ideas and concepts using text/visual features. Next, we will compare informational and science fiction text using a model and T-chart for text organization/structure. We will unpack an NGSS standard so participants understand which key concepts and vocabulary must be presented in the given text through a group summary for key takeaways.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers as change agents provide the cultural tools through the modeling of science and engineering practices using literacy strategies. Through modeling, teachers can engage students to interact with complex informational texts for increased sensemaking.

SPEAKERS:
Leslie Birdon (Richwood High School: Monroe, LA)

Does coherence perspective matter? Examining a comparison of 5E and storylines curricula on students’ academic achievement and attitudes toward science.

Friday, October 27 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Dissertation Defense Presentation.pdf
Copy of presentation - you can search for the full dissertation on ProQuest.

STRAND: Research to Practice

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Educators have struggled with maintaining student engagement in science, especially as students transition from primary to middle school and upper grades (Vedder-Weiss & Fortus, 2012). With the adoption of the Next Generation Science Standards, teachers are looking for curricula to support its implementation. Two curricula, mySci 5E and OpenSciEd storylines, were compared in terms of student academic achievement and attitudes toward science. The research questions were: (1) To what extent is there a difference between achievement in science by eighth grade students experiencing the OpenSciEd storyline science curriculum and those experiencing MySci 5E as measured by end of unit assessment scores? (2) To what extent is the difference between attitudes towards science by eighth grade students experiencing the OpenSciEd storyline science curriculum and those experiencing MySci 5E as measured by My Attitudes Toward Science (MATS) surveys (Hillman et al., 2016)?

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will hear about the results of the study and potential impacts of the perception of coherence on students’ academic achievements and attitudes toward science. Implications for future research will be discussed.

SPEAKERS:
Nina Blanton (Educator: , MO), Nicole Vick (Northwestern University)

Working Smarter not Harder - Grading that's Good for Students and Teachers

Friday, October 27 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 H


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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As educators shift their teaching practice to align with the Framework for K-12 Science and the NGSS, they face various challenges and barriers. One pressing challenge is how to align their new approach to teaching and learning with existing assessment and grading systems. In this session, we will provide examples of 3D assessments and associated scoring guidance. Participants will review student work for these sample assessments and identify evidence of understanding. They will collaborate with others in the session and determine how they would give grades based on set criteria. The second part of the session will highlight different approaches to grading based on local grading expectations (e.g., standards-based grading, daily grade requirements, or 100 point-based systems). Participants will leave the session with approaches to assessment and grading that support student sensemaking and honor the diverse resources students bring to the classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
The process of giving feedback and assigning grades is easier when there are strong materials and assessments to build from, and technology can help make it faster without decreasing effectiveness for students.

SPEAKERS:
Matt Krehbiel (OpenSciEd: New York, NY)

An Introduction to the 5E Instructional Model Incorporating Three-Dimensional Learning

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2206



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
An Introduction to the 5E Instructional Model Incorporating Three-Dimensional Learning.pptx

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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Roger Bybee's Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS) 5E Instructional Model is based on constructivist theories and enhances student inquiry through a series of planning strategies. This model is designed to incorporate all aspects of inquiry learning environments by engaging students and allowing students to explore the concepts being introduced, discover explanations for the concepts they are learning, and elaborate on what they have learned by applying their knowledge to new situations. Through the engage, explore, and explain stages of the model, knowledge about science is gained. In the elaborate stage, a problem is introduced and engineering and mathematics are used to help solve the problem. In this session participants will be introduced to the model through a states of matter lesson that can be adapted to the intermediate, middle, and high school levels. Three-Dimensional Learning will be highlighted and participants will have access to a 5E Model planning template.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will gain an understanding of the 5E instructional model and how the stages incorporate Three-Dimensional Learning -- the framework of the Next Generation Science Standards.

SPEAKERS:
Christina Hilton (Central Indiana Educational Service Center: Indianapolis, IN)

Equity and Social Justice in Space: Visioning culturally sustaining astronomy education (using an example from OpenSciEd Middle School)

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 H


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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In this workshop we will work through the "anchoring phenomenon" from the OpenSciEd Middle School space unit, which helps students see the relevance of astronomy by drawing on traditional indigenous astronomy knowledge, and students' own cultural knowledge to engage students in identifying and explaining patterns in the sky that set the rhythm for our lives. Participants will get a chance to experience the anchoring phenomenon, and share their own experience, expertise and ideas, to begin visioning how astronomy education can draw on student and community resources, connect students to traditional knowledge from around the world, and build on natural curiosity about questions that are older than Western history.

TAKEAWAYS:
Anchoring astronomy instruction in phenomena that invite connections between science and students' identities can support culturally sustaining pedagogy in the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Zoe Buck Bracey (Senior Science Educator and Director of Design for Justice: Colorado Springs, CO), Thomas Clayton (K-5 STEAM Specialist: Berkeley Heights, NJ), Jamie Noll (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO)

Unpacking the Crosscutting Concepts with a New NSTA Quick-Reference Guide to the Three Dimensions

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 C


STRAND: Leadership and Advocacy

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The NGSS and other standards based on the Framework of K-12 Education are quite complicated and often tricky to interpret. What teachers need is an easy-to-use reference guide to the standards, and since its release in 2014, the NSTA Quick-Reference Guide has become a perennial best-seller and an essential tool for many educators across the country. This session will be hosted by Ted Willard, the editor of the Quick-Reference Guide and formerly the in-house standards expert at NSTA. Ted will review the features listed above and how educators can use the Quick-Reference Guide to unpack the standards in their work developing curriculum, instruction, and assessment. Specifically, we will spend time exploring the crosscutting concepts in the standards using the tools and other resources in the Quick-Reference Guide.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how to unpack the three dimensions using the tools and resources in the Quick-Reference Guide and will gain insights into the meaning of the crosscutting concepts.

SPEAKERS:
Ted Willard (Discovery Education: Silver Spring, MD)

Planning for Effective Three-Dimensional Learning

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2208


STRAND: Research to Practice

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Helping students make sense of science means planning for high-quality science experiences that engage students in all three dimensions of the NGSS. This session focuses on exploring the ASET 3-D Mapping Tool as a mechanism for planning lesson sequences and units that integrate the Science and Engineering Practices, Disciplinary Core Ideas, and Crosscutting Concepts as outlined in the Framework (NRC, 2012). The presenter will lead the participants in analyzing an existing 6-8 curriculum with respect to the related standards, phenomena, learning objectives, science practices, crosscutting concepts, and disciplinary core ideas. The session is concluded by sharing the lessons learned from researchers and practitioners who have used the 3-D map in planning and revising NGSS-aligned science learning experiences. After working in small groups and engaging in whole-group discussions, participants will walk away with an NGSS planning tool and tangible unit and lesson plan ideas linked with NGSS.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will explore the ASET 3-D Mapping Tool for planning lessons and units that integrate the three dimensions of the NGSS. After working in small groups and engaging in whole-group discussions, they will leave with an NGSS planning tool and tangible unit and lesson ideas linked with NGSS.

SPEAKERS:
Stephanie Harmon (PIMSER (KY): No City, No State)

The Benefits of Immersive, Place-Based Professional Learning for Teachers

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 E


STRAND: Leadership and Advocacy

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The NGSS provides a powerful set of performance expectations to guide improvements in science education. Translating these performance expectations into practices requires support and professional learning opportunities for teachers. Even after a decade, the conceptual shifts and three-dimensional learning laid forth in A Framework, and defined in the NGSS, continues to be a challenge. As we shift students’ learning experiences from "learning about" to "figuring out" so too should we offer professional learning experiences to educators that allow them to experience the three-dimensional elements of science authentically. Immersive or place-based professional learning for teachers builds understanding, empathy, and connection to the three dimensions of NGSS. Learn how to connect educators and enhance their understanding of disciplinary core ideas through immersive experiences.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn about the benefits of immersive and place-based learning and how it can bring the sensemaking process to life. We will provide phenomena and examples which fully engage the three dimensions of the NGSS approach, and are in use in daily practice by researchers and scientists.

SPEAKERS:
Rick Henningfeld (Vivayic, Inc.: No City, No State), Brian Beierle (Vivayic, Inc.: No City, No State)

Supporting Preservice and New Teachers to Understand & Implement the NGSS

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 H


STRAND: Research to Practice

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We will engage with some examples of what has been used to prepare preservice and support novice teachers over the last 6 years leveraging HQIM to assist teachers with making sense of and planning to implement the NGSS. The session will cover how HQIM have been curated and modified to help teachers see examples of resources designed for the NGSS and then use those resources to plan and modify their instruction. Other resources for instruction and planning will also be shared.

TAKEAWAYS:
Ideas for ways use HQIM to help teachers understand and implement the vision of the Framework for Science Education, as well as resources to scaffold unpacking 3-D standards.

SPEAKERS:
Spencer Martin (Kansas City Kansas Public Schools: Kansas City, KS), Matt Krehbiel (OpenSciEd: New York, NY)

Embracing Empathy: Applying Human-Centered Design Principles to Support the Implementation of NGSS

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 B


STRAND: Leadership and Advocacy

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Learn to design moments people will remember and experiences that can have immediate impacts by adopting a human-centered mindset. Human-centered design thinking lets you better understand people's needs, motivations, and concerns to create highly-effective learning experiences for teachers and students. Implementing NGSS and three-dimensional teaching and learning requires ongoing support and high-quality professional learning opportunities for all stakeholders in science education. This session will explore how strategies and methods found in human-centered design can be leveraged to create professional learning to address the complexities teachers face in shifting practices to meet the vision of A K-12 Framework and the three-dimensional pedagogy of the NGSS. These strategies will enable designers to create inclusive spaces and environments to enhance professional development. Likewise, these strategies can be used by teachers to facilitate the student sensemaking process.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will experience practical human-centered design processes, methods, and tools used to deeply understand the people they are looking to serve and to continuously innovate solutions. Participants will leave this session equipped with strategies to design impactful learning experiences.

SPEAKERS:
Abby Tolley (Learning Analyst), Brian Beierle (Vivayic, Inc.: No City, No State)

Increasing Sensemaking in Gender and Minority Populations Through Innovative Learning Communities

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2207


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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In understanding how cultural bias affects underrepresented populations, teachers as change agents can design learning communities to increase peer collaboration for gender and minority populations. As students interact with each other, teachers provide the cultural tools needed for students to take on the role as a scientist or engineer. We will explore the essential components for framing innovative learning communities for underrepresented STEM populations. First, we will analyze intentionality in selecting cooperative learning structures for making learning targets through different scenarios. Second, we will conduct a reading jigaw on the importance of peer collaboration for increased diversity. Third, we will analyze lesson planning for learning communities using student work samples, videos, and instructional strategies and techniques. Lastly, educators will reflect on sensemaking through collaboration in a group summary.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers as change agents provide the cultural tools to affect learning communities. This session will provide tools and techniques to improve sensemaking through peer collaboration for gender and minority populations.

SPEAKERS:
Leslie Birdon (Richwood High School: Monroe, LA)

Sensemaking with Phenomenon Questioning Technique

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2102 A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Sensemaking with the Phenomenon Questioning Technique.pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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In this session, participants will experience and unpack the Phenomenon Questioning Technique and will be able to apply it in their classroom. Students observe a phenomenon and are given time to observe and wonder. In groups, students: - Ask as many questions as they can. - Don’t stop to discuss, judge, or answer questions. - Change any statements into questions. - Circle their best question. Remind students to think about what makes a good question as they make their choice (related to science, helps explain phenomena, able to be investigated or researched, etc.). - Share their questions on a “Student-Driven Question Board.” - ​​Using the commonalities, create one guiding question for the class. - Students reflect on how they did with questioning by way of the formative assessment.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will experience and unpack the Phenomenon Questioning Technique and will be able to apply it in their classrooms.

SPEAKERS:
Eric Hadley (Little Creek Nature Area: Florissant, MO), Rebecca Prokopf (Regional Curriculum Coordinator)

Do You Hate Writing Learning Targets? So DID We, Until We Made Them Work for Science

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2206



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Do You Hate Writing Learning Targets? NSTA KC 2023.pdf
PDF of presentation

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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School leaders frequently require teachers to share learning targets and success criteria to provide tangible goals for students. However, science sensemaking requires that students figure out, not learn about, science ideas by making sense of phenomena. Learning targets can undermine this sensemaking if they're written, as is often expected, in ways that give away the content. Our collaborative group of teachers developed a way to write learning targets to meet leadership expectations, support the intentions of learning targets, AND preserve the three-dimensional sensemaking at the core of A Framework for K-12 Science Education. This participatory presentation will share our tools and approach to integrating SEPs and CCCs into learning targets, as well as reflections on how this work supports deeper phenomenon sensemaking and standard alignment. Attendees will consider and discuss these tools and reflections, including application to their own classroom contexts.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will explore how dimension-aligned sentence stems help to make science learning targets and success criteria more 3-D and supportive of sensemaking. They will consider how the resulting targets and criteria support administration goals while improving teacher planning and practice.

SPEAKERS:
Richard Carroll (Teacher: Green River, WY), Matt Freze (Science Teacher: Green River, WY), Shawna Mattson (Green River High School: Green River, WY), Megan Allen (Teacher: Green River, WY), Katie Camis (SPED Teacher / support science: Green River, WY), Clare Gunshenan (University of Wyoming: Laramie, WY)

Now You’re Talking! Leveraging Conversations to Drive Student Understanding

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2211


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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Students collaboratively figuring out phenomena or solutions is key to the NGSS. Teachers need tools to facilitate these discussions into academically rich experiences that support ALL students. Science investigations offer opportunities for engagement for all, but need to be guided expertly. Student engagement is critical for academic success, especially for our English Learners, Special Education, and Foster Youth. Science investigations offer a way to engage students at any level and keep them excited about learning. While working through phenomena, students need to crystalize their own thinking, then share these thoughts with others in order to fully develop them. To do so, certain academic language and terms must be used. Through the shared activity of investigating phenomena, students work through science concepts and use the needed science vocabulary. Teachers guide the discussions through scaffolded questions that facilitate student communication by clarifying their t

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn to lead students to conceptual understandings by using discussion tools, academic language, and discussion routines that promote equity and engagement.

SPEAKERS:
Heather McDonald (Riverside Unified School District: Riverside, CA), Julia Smith (Riverside Unified School District: Riverside, CA), Shannon Dadlez (Riverside Unified School District: Riverside, CA)

“How to Cook a Turkey”: Students’ Misconceptions in Science, What We Assume vs. What They Think

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA-KC, Oct. 2023, How to Cook a Turkey”, Students' MIsconceptions..... upload.pptx

STRAND: Research to Practice

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Our students make sense of science and construct their ideas from many experiences, then use that “knowledge” as a foundation for their learning. However, it may not always be a solid foundation. We can help students develop their science knowledge through a deeper understanding of the misconceptions they hold, using phenomena, observation, sensemaking, and robust assessment. We can then assess students’ ideas and misconceptions in the sciences at various grade levels creating and using research-based assessments, understanding the importance of including their ideas in those assessments. When each item contains a choice between a scientifically correct answer and a common, widely-held, student misconception, we can more accurately evaluate our students’ true understanding of the DCI components of the NGSS.

TAKEAWAYS:
Educators will learn how to work with misconceptions that students hold in order to incorporate those into useful assessments. Use students’ sensemaking to discover ways to get at those ideas, and share your students’ misconceptions, hear others as well, and build research-based assessments.

SPEAKERS:
Cynthia Crockett (Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian: Cambridge, MA)

STEM for Special Populations

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2102 A


STRAND: STEM Haven

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Many educators do not utilize integrative STEM to its full potential. Integrative STEM benefits all students but can be especially impactful for gifted learners for whom academics come easy and struggling learners who constantly overcome failures. When STEM is done in homogeneous groups, students often contend with collaboration challenges and are forced to compromise. When working in heterogeneous groups, it is often the struggling students who are able to persevere in the face of failure and adversity that serve as leaders. In this session, attendees will be presented with the benefits of integrative STEM for their diverse learners. Examples of the positive impact it has on struggling learners and high achievers will be shared. Finally, attendees will leave with ideas about how to implement integrative STEM in their own classrooms based on their individual needs.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how integrative STEM benefits all students when done collaboratively.

SPEAKERS:
Erika Neuman (University of Texas at San Antonio: No City, No State)

Understanding Natural Hazards Using Free Online Simulations

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Julie Lee


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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As science educators, we often ask our students to make sense of phenomena that have a direct impact on human life such as hurricanes, floods, or wildfires. During this session, participants will explore free online modules which contain uncertainty-infused argumentation sets and interactive models that allow students to explore these events. Students’ work samples will be examined to see how their capacity for developing scientific arguments grows as they learn more about natural hazards. These samples include making claims from evidence, writing explanations that support their claims, and discussing the uncertainty of their explanations. The uncertainty discussions also include students’ evaluations of the models and data presented. This session is designed to introduce you to the modules and demonstrate how using them can strengthen your teaching and deepen student understanding of natural hazards through modeling and argumentation.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will explore a series of simulations designed to deepen students’ understanding of natural hazards. They will create a free account to access these simulations and associated curricula. An emphasis on the practices of modeling and argumentation will be used as part of the sensemaking process.

SPEAKERS:
Stephanie Harmon (PIMSER (KY): No City, No State)

The Amazing Power of Nature!

Saturday, October 28 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
The Amazing Power of Nature! Slides

STRAND: Leadership and Advocacy

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Nature, we vacation near it, we immerse ourselves in it, we need it for survival. A student’s natural curiosity about nature and the world around them can drive science learning and outcomes. Investigating natural phenomena within your state and close to your school creates authentic and relevant opportunities for students to research their local ecosystems. Experiences with nature not only promotes learning, but can help close the achievement gap (Liberman, 1998. Closing the Achievement Gap.) Citing studies, we will discuss how spending time in nature is healthy for students, faculty, and staff. Nature can lower blood pressure, calm anxiety, and improve mood. Using Missouri Department of Conservation’s Discover Nature Schools Curriculum as an example, we will discuss how taking learning outside can meet NGSS Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics and the Earth and Human Activity Strands. We will discuss ways to find and/or create nature experience near you.

TAKEAWAYS:
Nature is everywhere, accessible to everyone; from studying a crack in the sidewalk, where ants and other insects travel, to studying ponds, prairies, and forests. I can find and create nature study opportunities at my school, whether it is urban, suburban, or rural.

SPEAKERS:
Kathi Moore (Conservation Educator: HANNIBAL, MO), Sherri Russell (State Wildlife Veterinarian: Jefferson City, MO)

Assessing 3-D Understanding Using the NSTA Student Work Analysis Protocol -- Elementary

Saturday, October 28 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 C


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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Participants will gain experience evaluating student learning across the three dimensions using authentic student work samples. Discussion will focus on lesson-level three-dimensional performance expectations and what counts as evidence of student understanding for the three dimensions targeted by the assessment task. We will also use data collected from these student work examples to identify patterns/trends teachers can use to inform instruction to ensure all students have access to science learning.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants gain experience using the NSTA Student Work Analysis Protocol (open educational resource) and can share the protocol and application with colleagues in their school/district.

SPEAKERS:
Zoe Evans (Bremen City Schools: Bremen, GA), Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

STOM: Crosscutting Concepts as Sensemaking Tools

Saturday, October 28 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 G



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA_STOM_CrosscuttingConcepts.pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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Four methods to integrate (Charles W. [Andy] Anderson): Identify productive questions and goals; Provide rules for sensemaking; Guide the search for evidence; Support analogical reasoning. Using the lesson example - Marshmallows in a Vacuum: Set up a vacuum chamber and place a marshmallow inside. Start removing the air from the chamber. Ask students to make observations of what they see. Once most of the air is removed, stop and reverse the air movement to return to the chamber. Take the mass before each step. Another lesson example, Cookie Alarm: Design a cookie jar that sounds an alarm every time someone opens the jar. Participants are provided a container and micro:bit that they use to construct a solution. We will look through what information we need to gather in order to find the optimum solution to the problem. This will be accomplished without participants needing to code or have access to materials.

TAKEAWAYS:
How to harness the power of CCC's as tools to assist students in making sense of phenomena or solving engineering problems.

SPEAKERS:
Susan German (Hallsville Middle School: Hallsville, MO)

Standards-Based Grading and Learning in 3-D

Saturday, October 28 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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I will walk the audience through a landing page of my scale development for grading based off of Marzano’s book of scales for NGSS. I will explain how to convert the 0-4 grade into percentages for conventional grading systems. I will walk them through how to allow students to self-assess their knowledge gain based on objectives and putting those objectives into ladders of curriculum sequence. I will also explain how to use benchmark sheets for the Science and Engineering Practices that match their SEP part of the scale. I will also share the books and websites I gained my knowledge from, so attendees can develop their own mental model of the system for Standards-Based Grading and Learning.

TAKEAWAYS:
You will walk away with a landing page that lays out a system that can be your starting point into SBG & L in the three dimensions, with many resources contained within.

SPEAKERS:
Michelle Gall (Science Teacher and MTSS Facilitator)

Digital Moves To Boost Student Agency

Saturday, October 28 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 A


STRAND: Tech Tools

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Digital notebooking is a tool that can support both teaching and learning and can be utilized for a variety of purposes. The time during this 60 minute session will be split between the presenters sharing information including examples of various ways to implement digital notebooks that align with research-based best practices and participants having time to plan and prepare usage for their own setting. Teachers will leave with ready-to-use takeaways to assist them in empowering students to not only learn content more independently but also reflect on their learning path and level of understanding to gear up for future success. Teachers will also be able to explore how the notebooks provide quick access to each student's progress in learning and the ability to give feedback when and where it is needed.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will leave this session with a digital notebook template and the knowledge and resources to create and implement one successfully, as well as a framework that coicides with the use of a digital notebook and fits any curriculum to allow for students to have influence on their learning.

SPEAKERS:
Vera Hayslip (7th grade Science: Cincinnati, OH), Kelly Hartings (Indian Hill Middle School: CINCINNATI, OH)

Applying Crosscutting Concepts and Science and Engineering Practices to Elective Courses

Saturday, October 28 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2210


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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As a district, we have worked to ensure that all courses have three dimensional standards. We currently teach all of the NGSS standards by the completion of sophomore year. Our freshmen physical science course teaches the physical science standards and one-half of the earth science standards, while our sophomore biology course teaches the biology standards and the other one-half of the earth science standards. To meet the rigor of NGSS, our elective courses such as Chemistry, Physics, Environmental Science, Earth Science, Forensics Science and Plants and Propagation have all built upon the NGSS standards in content, along with identifying Science and Engineering Practices and Crosscutting Concepts. Our goal would be that participants would leave with a process in which they could do the same. Our process has been influenced by the 5 tools training as well as many of the NSTA publications designed to lead teachers and teacher leaders in standard development.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will leave with a process for creating elective standards that are three-dimensional.

SPEAKERS:
Teresa Bender (Omaha Northwest High School: No City, No State), Jennifer Rhine (Omaha Public Schools: Omaha, NE)

Questions and Crosscutting Concepts: How can we support students in asking good questions?

Saturday, October 28 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 F



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
CCCs.pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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The Framework requires that students engage in three-dimensional sensemaking around phenomena. In OpenSciEd units, this begins with the anchor lesson, in which students engage with a phenomenon in supported ways before generating the questions that drive the unit. Many teachers wonder how we get students to ask questions that align with the learning goals of the unit. In this session, participants will see for themselves how crosscutting concepts can appear in student questions and how those questions are motivated in the lesson. The presenters will discuss the important role crosscutting concepts play in supporting students' question generation, and participants will have an opportunity to see how students' initial questions and key crosscutting concepts continue to play a prominent role in sensemaking later in the storyline.

TAKEAWAYS:
Instruction can be designed so that crosscutting concepts are both a tool for student sensemaking as well as a desirable outcome. In particular, crosscutting concepts can help students ask questions that will be productive throughout a storylines unit.

SPEAKERS:
Whitney Mills (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO), Jamie Noll (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO), Dan Voss (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL)

Demystifying Models: Practical Modeling in the Science Classroom

Saturday, October 28 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2104 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
2023 NSTA Kansas City Conference Session Packet (1).pdf
NSTA Conference Student Modeling Examples.pdf
NSTA Conference_ _Approachable and Practical Modeling in the Science Classroom_ Session .pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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It can be daunting to incorporate scientific modeling in a practical and applicable way. This inquiry-centered session will address modeling in the science classroom through hands-on experiences and discussion using NGSS-linked phenomena. The goal of this session is to provide teachers with an overview of modeling routines while providing ready-to-use resources to demystify this Science and Engineering Practice. This practice is an essential springboard for student discourse and increasing their science literacy. Models give students the opportunity to reflect on their learning and see their thoughts evolve over time about a given natural phenomenon. Participants will have a hands-on experience explaining the phenomenon, “What is happening when the boiling water hits the cold air?”. Participants will construct models illustrating their scientific explanation of this phenomenon and engage in collegial discussions about how they can incorporate scientific modeling practices into their

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how to model a given natural phenomenon using scaffolds and ready-to-use resources for immediate classroom implementation.

SPEAKERS:
Brittany Blair (Charles H. Barrows STEM Academy: North Windham, CT), Nicole Vitello Lowell (Charles H. Barrows STEM Academy: North Windham, CT)

Using Fish in a Tree (Lynda Mullaly Hunt) to Incorporate STEM into Literacy

Saturday, October 28 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2208


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Using a story, such as Fish in a Tree, that is already being used in the classroom as the structure and inspiration for STEM-related activities is one way to incorporate additional time into the week for STEM. Some of our school districts have 45 minutes every other week dedicated to Science, so the idea is to incorporate scientific thinking and activities into the Literacy and Math blocks. Fish in a Tree is a perfect example of ways to incorporate science habits of mind from a non-science specific book. In this presentation, attendees will explore connections between the three dimensions of NGSS through the lens of literature, including the tools to create questioning strategies and prompts to incorporate into any book they and their students are reading. This session will provide attendees with the skills to take any reading and layer science and engineering into the context of the literature.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will take a deep dive into ways to incorporate aspects of three-dimensional science instruction through questioning strategies and activities using Fish in a Tree as the example literature. These strategies can be applied to any book you use with your students.

SPEAKERS:
Heather Summers (Project ECHO for Education)

The Matter-Energy-Forces Triangle: A Common Approach to Make Sense of Physics, Chemistry, Biology, and Earth Science in OpenSciEd

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 H


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Many students experience high school science without considering the interconnectedness of different domains. By leveraging the Energy and Matter crosscutting concept and uniting this lens with a forces perspective, we consider how a Matter-Energy-Forces (MEF) triangle can help students apply core principles of physical science across multiple domains. We explore the MEF triangle’s use in three different units that highlight Earth and Space Science alongside Biology, Physics or Chemistry to make explicit connections to the crosscutting concept of energy and matter and core life and physical science Disciplinary Core Ideas. Examples include fires, polar ice melt, tectonic plate motion, and meteors. We also consider how this tool could be useful for students over the course of many units and how it can increase access to more difficult life and physical science concepts through the use of this routine. Participants will practice applying the MEF triangle to phenomena in their contexts.

TAKEAWAYS:
The Framework calls for “a common use of language about energy and matter across the disciplines in science instruction.” The MEF triangle uses cues and prompts to draw attention to interactions between matter, energy, and forces to help students make sense of complex phenomena across domains.

SPEAKERS:
Whitney Mills (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO), Jamie Noll (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO), Dan Voss (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Diego Rojas-Perilla (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO)

How About a Field Trip...to Mars?

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 1501 A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Links and resources
NSTA_2023.pdf
NSTA_2023.pptx

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Since the first interplanetary probes were launched, the data that have been returned by these probes have been both fascinating in the insight they have returned, but daunting in their sheer volume, making their use by classroom teachers limited. Yet engagement with planetary phenomena rarely cease to generate “wows” among students. A free software package, JMARS, allows GIS-based imagery and chemical data for planetary bodies to be accessed to address the questions of classroom-based investigations. This presentation will show how JMARS, coupled with the broad range of Mars rover photography (Spirit, Opportunity, Curiosity, and Perseverance) available online, can be used to design virtual field trips on Mars, and mesh with the NSTA Sensemaking framework by generating student questions about another planet, as if they were standing on it themselves. Attendees are encouraged to bring a laptop device and download the software appropriate to their computer at https://jmars.asu.edu/.

TAKEAWAYS:
Space exploration seems to be an abstract concept to many students, so placing them as close as possible to the available data, including not just images but chemical and physical information as well, allows them to gain a deeper understanding of Earth phenomena and processes.

SPEAKERS:
Eric Pyle (James Madison University: Harrisonburg, VA)

Creating and Sustaining a Virtual Professional Learning Community

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2202



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Slides
Slides used to guide the discussion during the presentation. Associated links (website, resources, etc.) can be found embedded in the slides.

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Come see a successful online professional learning model that promotes collaboration around universal problems of practice. Each session allows educators to learn about new strategies implemented in classrooms, debrief in job-alike roles, share resources, and develop a plan to refine their practice.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will gain access to tools and resources for use in classrooms from both a teacher and instructional coaching role, as well as work on how they might make use of these resources for their own learning, learning within their own PLCs, or to develop a community of their own.

SPEAKERS:
Amy Johannsen (Southeast Polk High School: Pleasant Hill, IA), Jason Martin-Hiner (Keystone Area Education Agency: Elkader, IA)

Green Schools: Modeling Sustainability, Fostering Hands-On Learning, and Nurturing Student Leaders

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2204


STRAND: Leadership and Advocacy

Show Details

OPENING: Define 'green school'; Introduce pillars; Provide examples; “Green Lens” Evaluation: Attendees rate their school for each pillar. 'Challenges' reflection for incorporating green schools practices. WHOLE-SCHOOL SUSTAINABILITY (WSS) & SHOW-ME GREEN SCHOOLS: Define WSS - work within campus, curriculum, culture. Show-Me Green Schools explained with video testimonials: Green Schools Quest (student-driven, project-based contest; community mentors assist lead teacher with project development & implementation); Missouri Green Schools (annual recognition for systems approach to WSS; roadmap for achievement); U.S. Depart. of Education Green Ribbon School Award (national award for demonstrated excellence & innovation of designated pillars); Green Schools Network BENEFITS: Increased job satisfaction, student engagement & achievement, better health for school community, social-emotional well-being; ADDRESSING CHALLENGES: Team development, staff collaboration, whole school support; CLOSING: Programs in US.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn what green schools are and how they benefit students, staff, and administration. Participants will walk away with some ideas for getting started, addressing common challenges, and connecting with green school teams in their state.

SPEAKERS:
Traci Jansen (Kirkwood School District: KIRKWOOD, MO)

Turn Your Classroom Into Hogwarts - Gamification!

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2504 A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Links to ZedScience Website and Presentation Files
One of the QR codes will take you to Zedscience.co where you can sign up for my "Science Smarter" newsletter and learn more about The Science Pawdcast. The other QR code will take you to my community where you can make a free account and then have access to SCIENCE SLIDES which has all of my resources for my current presentations.

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

A sure-fire way to engage your class is to try to turn your concepts into a game! I have been running a Hogwart's House Cup challenge for 8 years and, for many students, it is the highlight of my students' semester. In short, students are sorted into one of the four Hogwart's Houses and they compete against the other houses for the cup! It seems simple, but it's so much more than that! I'll go through how I set it up, all the tips and tricks that I've learned along the way, and how easy it would be to do it in your class, with your subject, for your grade level. Friendly competition is a great motivator, as well as teaching kids to work together as team. It's the perfect blend of leadership and engagement!

TAKEAWAYS:
Gamification is difficult without a blueprint. This session will give you the blueprint for Hogwarts.

SPEAKERS:
Jason Zackowski (Science Curriculum Lead)

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