2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

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FILTERS APPLIED:Poster, Leadership and Advocacy, Physical Science

 

Rooms and times subject to change.
6 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Process Over Product: Student Sensemaking Through Modeling

Friday, October 27 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

In this poster session, we highlight how two 5th-grade teachers of linguistically diverse students strategically used the Science and Engineering Practice of Developing and Using Models over the course of a physical science unit to increase opportunities for sensemaking with all students. First, we show sample models from multilingual learners across three time points in the unit: initial, revised, and final model. At each time point, we highlight what the teachers did to elicit and interpret student thinking. In particular, we share how “final models” can serve as a more authentic end-of-unit task when an iterative modeling process has been enacted. We describe how the teachers’ own perceptions of modeling changed over the course of the unit. As a result of heightened student sensemaking with the more iterative modeling process, the teachers shifted away from positioning models as products and toward positioning models as evidence of current and evolving sensemaking.

TAKEAWAYS:
By strategically allowing all students, particularly multilingual learners, to develop and use increasingly sophisticated models over time, teachers shifted away from “models as products” and toward “models as evidence of sensemaking.”

SPEAKERS:
Iovanna Williams (Science Teacher: , NY), Adriana Romanzo (Elementary Science Teacher: New York, NY), Abigail Schwenger (Research Associate)

Make Your Own Poly-density Bottles

Friday, October 27 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Poly Density Bottles Poster1.jpg

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Polydensity bottles are made with salt, isopropyl alcohol, water, UV beads, and pony beads. These materials are easily accessible and relatively inexpensive. With the polydensity bottles, students can engage in sensemaking related to density, molecular properties, solubility, and other concepts supported by the NRC K-12 Framework. Students can be challenged to complete calculations and create their own bottles, or teachers can make bottles to be used as an introductory or anchoring phenomenon. This session will provide multiple ideas on ways to use these interesting bottles to give students at multiple levels the opportunity to engage in sensemaking and Science Practices. Instructions will be given for creating bottles with multiple recipes, and sources of instructional materials will be provided to participants.

TAKEAWAYS:
Poly density bottles are an effective and inexpensive way to provide a discrepant event to intrigue students. Students at various levels can engage with this phenomenon to engage in sensemaking as they employ several different concepts in Physical Science.

SPEAKERS:
Kelly Moore (Tennessee Tech: Cookeville, TN)

Using Pan and Digital Balances to Describe and Compare Weight

Friday, October 27 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Different Instruments for Quantifying Qualifying Weight
Weight measurement with pan and digital balances.

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The poster aims to present student ideas about mathematics and computational thinking (MCT) in the context of weight (elementary) or mass (secondary). Standards K-PS2-1 and 3-PS2-1 emphasize and guide the three-dimensional approach. Participants consider the differences and similarities between a pan and digital balance with a Venn diagram. Students typically think of weight as a quantitative measure. The pan balance can be used to describe the weight of an object both qualitatively and quantitatively. In mathematics education, pan balances quantify the weight of objects with a set of known weights. Weighted plastic of one, five, or ten increments placed on one side of the pan quantitatively measures the ”weight” of the object on the other pan. Educators use “weight” to describe “mass” and refer to heaviness or the amount of stuff an object has at the elementary level. Comparing and contrasting quantities and relationships align with the SEP of using MCT.

TAKEAWAYS:
After comparing the weight of two or more objects with a pan and digital balance, a Venn diagram structures students' thinking about the weight measurement tools. We present students’ ideas about balances and offer strategies to uncover students’ ideas about qualitative and quantitative measurements.

SPEAKERS:
Jaclyn Murray (Mercer University: Macon, GA)

Computing Earth's System's -- A Project {FUTURE} Computer Science Integrated Unit

Friday, October 27 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

In Wisconsin, 5th-grade students develop models to explain how Earth's systems interact. 10 Milwaukee Public Schools are engaged in Project {FUTURE}; a DOA research and outreach grant as partners with Marquette and Sacred Heart Universities to bring Computer Science into elementary classrooms. A group of these Project {FUTURE} teachers are members of a collaborative cohort developing integrated computer science units. These units embed and bridge Computer Science content, such as algorithms and programming, into other content areas. The highlighted "novel" integrated unit connects the science topic of Earth's systems to the beginning computer programming language of Blockly to create interactive models using CODE.org's Sprite Lab. The culminating project requires students to incorporate research and data gathered on two or more of Earth's systems, and create an interactive app using sprites, variables, and simulations within CODE.org Computer Science Fundamental Course F.

TAKEAWAYS:
The poster session will outline the collaborative process experienced by a cohort of teachers in designing integrated computer science units. The featured Earth's System unit embeds computer science components of programming and algorithms with the WI and NGSS grade 5 standards for physical science.

SPEAKERS:
Renee Scianni (Milwaukee Public Schools: Milwaukee, WI)

Worthwhile Words: Implementing Effective Vocabulary Instruction

Friday, October 27 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

A middle school PLC observed that students were not retaining or using content specific vocabulary or completing teacher provided practice. Through a coaching partnership, educators researched and determined to prioritize the following learning: conceptual understanding, explicit instruction, connection between words, multiple interactions with words, and discourse among peers. First, teachers minimized the words in each unit to focus only on Tier 3 and Tier 2 words. Next, the educators placed the words in a flow chart on a large wall showing connections between words. Teachers developed conceptual understanding during instruction and ways for students to interact with each word. Examples included; labs, readings, definitions, and discourse with peers. The teachers intentionally selected strategies to interact with each word such as defining, drawing, comparing, summarizing, discussing, and synthesizing their understanding. Student work was displayed on the interactive wall.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will leave with strategies to implement vocabulary instruction in any science content area.

SPEAKERS:
Maryam Siddiqui (Teacher: , IL), Meghan Chuipek (Thompson Middle School)

Mountain Rescue: Recasting STEM Students as Middle School MacGyvers

Friday, October 27 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Aligned to Next Generation Science Standards, our collaborative card game called Mountain Rescue engages players in STEM learning while immersed in an authentic and thrilling context: seeking rescue from a plane crash. Designed for grades 5-8, the game is playable in about 30-minutes. Preliminary play-test results indicate that students are engaged and feel the game has value for collaborative learning. During gameplay, players utilize collaborative skills essential to STEM careers by working together to solve puzzles related to electricity, physics, chemistry, and engineering design. Yet, to convert our research into effective classroom practice–we need you. Please stop by our poster and share your feedback with us. We would love to hear your thoughts about gameplay, game design, and potential implementation issues which we will incorporate into our next round of funding. Maybe you would even like to have the next version of Mountain Rescue come to your classroom!

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn about the collaborative STEM card game called Mountain Rescue. Presenters will share the design, gameplay basics, and research findings. Presenters will engage attendees in lively discourse around necessary improvements and implementation issues.

SPEAKERS:
Denise Bressler (Chief Ideologist: Liberty Corner, NJ)

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