2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

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Rooms and times subject to change.
9 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Latinas in STEM - Using An Asset-Based Mindset to Encourage Latina STEM Persistence

Friday, October 27 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2211



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA KC 2023_ Using an Asset-Based Approach to Identify Sources of Persistence for Latinas in Selecting STEM Undergraduate Degrees.pdf

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

The population of Latinx students is rapidly growing in the United States, yet Latinas are underrepresented in STEM careers compared to their peers of other identities. This could be in part due to the deficit-based ideology that has historically been utilized when describing this group's success in academic disciplines. This presentation will highlight the findings of a recent qualitative study that asked Latina STEM undergraduate students to reflect on their sources of persistence in high school STEM coursework. The study participants’ responses were correlated with Yosso's (2005) “Community Cultural Wealth Model" to identify their unique sources of strength and persistence in STEM. The study findings will serve as the foundation for recommendations to be made for the implementation of equitable and asset-based shifts to promote Latinas’ persistence and success in STEM at the secondary levels.

TAKEAWAYS:
Using an asset-based approach, participants will engage in social justice-themed conversations to equitably encourage Latina high school students’ persistence in STEM coursework. Ready-to-use strategies will be featured to promote greater perseverance in STEM for Latinas.

SPEAKERS:
Nicole Vitello Lowell (Charles H. Barrows STEM Academy: North Windham, CT)

Vision, Change, and Interactions in General Education Life Science (IGELS) Courses

Friday, October 27 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

For many students, an undergraduate general education life science (GELS) course may be the only one where they are exposed to scientific reasoning at the collegiate level. In order to contribute to a scientifically literate and informed society, the Interactions in General Education Life Sciences (IGELS) project aims to engage students in reasoning skills around topics that are highly relevant to students. We describe the goals and activities of IGELS and provide preliminary results of our survey of GELS instructors that assesses their current knowledge and implementation of the “Vision and Change” (AAAS, 2009) framework in their courses. These data will inform our future activities to provide faculty development and develop curricular models that support reasoning and relevancy in GELS courses while implementing principles of “Vision and Change.”

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will be able to describe the mission of IGELS and envision how future projects can assist educators in increasing reasoning skills in learners in ways that are relevant to their lives.

SPEAKERS:
Heather Rissler (North Iowa Area Community College)

Playing Games: A Study Into the Effectiveness of the Inclusion of Gamification in Science Lessons and the Impact of Engagement of Exceptional Learners

Friday, October 27 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

This poster focuses on the study that aims to investigate the effectiveness of gamification in science classes for exceptional learners, specifically those with emotional behavioral disorders (EBD) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The study seeks to determine if gamification can increase engagement in science classes for exceptional learners, identify methods for incorporating gamification, identify the specific components of lessons that can be gamified, and measure the level of engagement of exceptional learners in science classes. The study includes 11 exceptional learners from a Title 1 alternative school in Florida. The participants come from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds, including some designated as homeless and living in group homes. The majority of the participants are male and African American. The study highlights the importance of engaging exceptional learners in science classes to improve their academic performance and prevent negative attitudes towards education.

TAKEAWAYS:
Using gamification in science classes can increase exceptional learners' engagement and interest in science. Educators can use the study's insights to gamify specific components of science lessons and improve engagement, which can aid in closing the achievement gap for exceptional learners.

SPEAKERS:
Lacie Conner (ESE Science Teacher, EBD)

Community Science Data Talks

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 A


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Community Science Data Talks are short 10-15 minute classroom conversations prompted by local data and data visualizations, similar to a number talk or a notice and wonder activity. In such, students will begin with data visualizations and add lenses to examine their place, such as historical (e.g. policy of "redlining"), ecological (e.g. amount of tree canopy cover), socioeconomic (e.g. rental burden), personal (e.g. photographs they take). Throughout a Community Science Data Talk, students are positioned as the most knowledgeable agents about their communities and, by experiencing multiple data talks over time, the accumulation of multiple lenses on the same place should support students in making sense of how these places come to be over time and promote discussions about how science and math can help them understand, advocate for, and appreciate the places they live. We will share lessons learned from piloting these data talks with teachers in multiple countries and contexts.

TAKEAWAYS:
You will takeaway specific teaching tools including a description of the thinking behind a Community Science Data Talk, a how-to planning and implementation guide, and ideas for how to navigate student emotions towards collective actions around local environmental impacts.

SPEAKERS:
Imogen Herrick (Assistant Professor of STEM Education: , CA), Michael Lawson (Teaching Assistant Professor)

Culturally Responsive STEM: Care, Culture, & Consistency

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2206


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Cultural misunderstandings often occur in many environments because of cultural norms that are ingrained in different people from their home environment, community, and heritage. This is especially prevalent in many STEM fields. People must be taught situational appropriateness for the different settings without diminishing the value of their cultural norms. Often these misunderstandings occur when dealing with interactions. Using the "3C" Model of Care, Culture, and Consistency, will allow educators to engage with them in more positive atmospheres that promote student learning in STEM for all. Showing students that you care, recognizing their cultures, and being consistent will enable STEM teachers and students to have a better understanding of one another, and will also create a positive learning environment where students feel valued and effective enough to want to pursue careers in STEM fields.

TAKEAWAYS:
By the end of this session, attendees will learn about their own biases as it pertains to student ability and be able to use the "3C Model" of Care, Culture, & Consistency to address their misconceptions and better service students of various cultural backgrounds.

SPEAKERS:
Kristen Antoine-Morse (East Baton Rouge Parish School System: Baton Rouge, LA)

Advocating for Culturally Inclusive Practices in STEAM

Saturday, October 28 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 A


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

After a brief introduction of session presenters and review of session norms, participants will be engaged in small group review and whole group discussion of a case study that provides evidence of why culture is important in the context of STEAM lessons. Following the case study, participants will be introduced to a Culturally Inclusive Lesson Planning Tool to enhance the participation of diverse learners from traditionally underrepresented students. The tool is grounded in culturally relevant research strategies that ensures that all students feel included in their specific classroom environment. The session will conclude with a debrief and evaluation of the experience.

TAKEAWAYS:
Why are culturally inclusive strategies important in STEAM classrooms? How can you synthesize strategies that challenge and engage a diverse group of learners? In this session, we will reveal a planning tool that you can use to advocate for learner success in STEAM classroom settings.

SPEAKERS:
Deanna Taylor (Interactive Learning Solutions LLC: Columbia, SC)

NASA Science Activation Strategies for Creating Authentic STEM Learning in Rural Communities and Classrooms

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2202



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NASA Rural Presentation.pptx

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Curious about establishing sustainable relationships within rural communities? Join NASA Science Activation members who live and work in rural communities for an interactive discussion about building reciprocity, relationships, and project sustainability while enhancing NASA STEM education experiences for learners of all ages. To broaden participation and learn about the vast knowledge and practices shared among the members, NASA conducted interviews with the awarded project members working with rural communities, coded their stories, and found emerging themes. NASA Science Activation aims to share the lessons learned, solutions, challenges, and recommendations of these projects, which may assist you by providing best practices for engaging your community; providing diversity, equity, inclusion, and accessibility tips for reaching underserved audiences, and providing opportunities to enlist NASA support and bring subject matter experts into your classroom or school district.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will receive connections to NASA subject matter experts working with rural communities as well as virtual resources and future opportunities for classroom support and collaboration.

SPEAKERS:
Rachael Arens (Curriculum Specialist: Bennington, NE), Matthew Cass (Physics and Astronomy Instructor: Sylva, NC)

Reducing Gender Disproportionality and Increasing Enrollment in Advanced STEM Courses for Female High School Students with Advanced Placement Potential

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2504 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA National Conference Presentation - Gender Disproportionality - Observations, Initial Findings and Action Steps to Achieve Gender Parity.pptx
Protocol and Criteria for School Counselors to Increase Female Student Enrollment in AT Physics.pdf
Protocol and Criteria for Teachers to Increase Female Student Enrollment in AT Physics.pdf

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

The purpose of this program is to develop an understanding of the problem of gender disproportionality as it impacts enrollment in advanced STEM courses. Quantitative and qualitative data will be reviewed along with the foundation for the development of models and intervention strategies school districts can develop to begin to reverse this trend. Advanced Placement Physics-C Potential was used as a factor to determine which female students to target for intervention, with the anticipated result being a more proportional enrollment in the targeted advanced STEM course. The research revealed that an encouraging message from school counselors, teachers, and peers, delivered along with awareness of individual AP Physics-C Potential, can promote an increased level of female student enrollment in advanced STEM courses such as AT or AP Physics and reduce the phenomenon of gender disproportionality which precipitated this study.

TAKEAWAYS:
Research-backed models of intervention to reduce gender disproportionality will be presented, along with strategies for implementation by school districts.

SPEAKERS:
Richard Stec (West Windsor-Plainsboro High School: Plainsboro, NJ)

Using Photovoice to see Climate Change in your Everyday Life

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2201


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Heat domes! Wildfires! Drought! Students across the world are experiencing the impact of climate change in their everyday lives, but often students feel hopelessness and fear when thinking and learning about these issues. In this workshop, we will discuss Photovoice, a flexible (e.g. low-floor, high-ceiling task) classroom practice that unpacks students’ ideas, experiences, and emotions through critical reflection on self-generated photos of climate impacts in their own community. Through individual and collaborative reflection, students investigate their ideas in ways that shift feelings of fear and hopelessness toward constructive hope and action. We will first explore how student-generated photos from their local community can build teacher capacity to identify and understand students’ thinking about climate change and the phenomena they find compelling about the topic. Then we will dig into how to utilize photovoiceas a launching point for relevant climate change instruction.

TAKEAWAYS:
You will takeaway a Google slide deck with specific teaching tools that are how-to guides for facilitating students' individual and collaborative teams, meaning making around the photos they generate, and how to navigate their emotions towards collective actions around local climate change impacts.

SPEAKERS:
Michael Lawson (Teaching Assistant Professor), Imogen Herrick (Assistant Professor of STEM Education: , CA)

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