2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

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Rooms and times subject to change.
14 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

SC-2: Designing and Using Three-Dimensional Assessment Tasks to Support NGSS Instruction

Wednesday, October 25 • 8:15 AM - 3:30 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 B

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STRAND: Research to Practice

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This full day course will introduce and immerse participants in the Next Generation Science Assessment (NGSA) design approach including unpacking dimensions, developing integrated dimension maps, articulating learning performances, identifying phenomena, and designing tasks.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn the steps for designing 3-dimensional tasks that align with NGSS performance expectations, take into consideration students’ diverse backgrounds, and create their own tasks at the grade level and science topic of their choice.

SPEAKERS:
Joseph Krajcik (CREATE for STEM Institute, Michigan State University: East Lansing, MI), Christopher Harris (WestEd)

Getting a Foothold for Creating Three-Dimensional Classroom-Based Assessment Tasks

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 A


STRAND: Research to Practice

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Learn a design process for creating three-dimensional assessment tasks that support instruction and student learning. Participants will be introduced to each phase: unpacking dimensions, developing integrated dimension maps, articulating learning performances, identifying phenomena, and designing tasks.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn the steps of a systematic process for designing three-dimensional tasks that align with NGSS performance expectations, take into consideration students’ diverse backgrounds, and can be used in classrooms to provide information to teachers and students to improve learning.

SPEAKERS:
Joseph Krajcik (CREATE for STEM Institute, Michigan State University: East Lansing, MI)

Evaluating Information & Digital Literacy

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Andy Kirk



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Evaluating Info & Digital Literacy Slides
Evaluating Info & Digital Literacy Slides

STRAND: Research to Practice

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One of the most powerful skills we can develop in our students to practice scientific literacy when they leave our classroom is the skill of critically evaluating information. This is particularly pertinent today with an uncharted landscape of misinformation and social media. We will share our experience as high school science teachers of explicitly incorporating the NGSS Scientific Practice of Obtaining, Evaluating, and Communicating information (SEP8) into our classrooms with proficiency-based assessment. We will share the research that influenced our work, resources that include scaffolds, activities, and assessments, and lastly, reflections and strategies after having explicitly taught and assessed evaluating information. After our first year teaching this scientific practice, we asked ourselves, "How had we not taught this skill before!?"

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will be provided with a framework and resources to help students engage in arguably the most important skill needed for them to continue to develop their scientific literacy outside of and after school -- to critically evaluate information for themselves and for a functioning democracy.

SPEAKERS:
Brett Erdmann (Adlai E. Stevenson High School: Lincolnshire, IL), Thomas Wolfe (Adlai E. Stevenson High School: Lincolnshire, IL)

CONSTRUCTing Effective Assessment Questions Using the NGSS DCIs

Friday, October 27 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2205



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA-KC 2023, CONSTRUCT presentation, NSTA upload.pptx

STRAND: Research to Practice

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Using the Disciplinary Core Ideas and a research-based “citizen science” approach, science educators contributed their own test items, and also helped to revise existing test items in order to address crucial issues such as difficulty, gender, and racial/ethnic bias that were present in the item analysis characteristics. We share the analysis and results of these efforts so that educators can assess their own test items to be more inclusive of all students understandings in one of the dimensions of the 3-D approach to learning. Learn what changes contributed to improvement of the item as well as what types of changes or revisions made the item worse than before. We also share results of field testing of these items in student classrooms and discuss the importance of incorporating students’ misconceptions into the response choices to capture their true understanding of science concepts as outlined in the DCIs.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn to evaluate assessment questions that you use to assess students’ sensemaking of elements outlined in the NGSS DCIs. Are the questions free of bias, not too difficult, indicative of overall student performance? Do they include common misconceptions that students hold? Access a free resource.

SPEAKERS:
Cynthia Crockett (Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian: Cambridge, MA)

An Introduction to Designing Three-Dimensional Assessment Tasks to Support NGSS Teaching and Learning

Friday, October 27 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 C


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

This course is designed to introduce participants to the Next Generation Science Assessment (NGSA) design approach including unpacking dimensions, developing integrated dimension maps, articulating learning performances, identifying phenomena, and designing tasks.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn the steps of a systematic process for designing 3-dimensional tasks that align with NGSS performance expectations, take into consideration students’ diverse backgrounds, and can be used in classrooms to provide information to teachers and students to improve learning.

SPEAKERS:
Joseph Krajcik (CREATE for STEM Institute, Michigan State University: East Lansing, MI), Christopher Harris (WestEd)

Does coherence perspective matter? Examining a comparison of 5E and storylines curricula on students’ academic achievement and attitudes toward science.

Friday, October 27 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Dissertation Defense Presentation.pdf
Copy of presentation - you can search for the full dissertation on ProQuest.

STRAND: Research to Practice

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Educators have struggled with maintaining student engagement in science, especially as students transition from primary to middle school and upper grades (Vedder-Weiss & Fortus, 2012). With the adoption of the Next Generation Science Standards, teachers are looking for curricula to support its implementation. Two curricula, mySci 5E and OpenSciEd storylines, were compared in terms of student academic achievement and attitudes toward science. The research questions were: (1) To what extent is there a difference between achievement in science by eighth grade students experiencing the OpenSciEd storyline science curriculum and those experiencing MySci 5E as measured by end of unit assessment scores? (2) To what extent is the difference between attitudes towards science by eighth grade students experiencing the OpenSciEd storyline science curriculum and those experiencing MySci 5E as measured by My Attitudes Toward Science (MATS) surveys (Hillman et al., 2016)?

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will hear about the results of the study and potential impacts of the perception of coherence on students’ academic achievements and attitudes toward science. Implications for future research will be discussed.

SPEAKERS:
Nina Blanton (Educator: , MO), Nicole Vick (Northwestern University)

How do cultural factors impact acceptance of evolutionary theories among university biology majors?

Friday, October 27 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


STRAND: Research to Practice

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Research has shown that student acceptance of evolutionary theories are impacted by cultural factors as well as knowledge of biology and the nature of science. The information technology age is an important change in our culture as Americans in the last 2 decades. The poster will present a comparison of influences on acceptance of evolution in 2000 and 2023. Culturally competent educators must understand and respect multiple cultural ways of knowing in their instruction and assessment.

TAKEAWAYS:
Research has shown that student acceptance of evolutionary theories is impacted by cultural factors, as well as knowledge of biology and the nature of science. Culturally competent educators must understand and respect multiple cultural ways of knowing in their instruction and assessment.

SPEAKERS:
Taylor Alicea (Parkview High School: Springfield, MO), Julie Mayne (Evangel University: Springfield, MO)

Using "Science Friday" to Promote Pre-Service Elementary Teachers' Science Teaching Self-Efficacy

Friday, October 27 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


STRAND: Research to Practice

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Implementing a practice based approach within a science methods course has the power to positively impact the science teaching self-efficacy of pre-service elementary teachers (Flores, 2015). Designing and implementing a performance based final as a culminating experience within a science methods course is an example of such a practice based approach. In addition to submitting a 5E lesson plan with all the accoutrements, pre-service elementary teachers planned, rehearsed, and facilitated a 'Science Friday" event at a local elementary school. This "Science Friday" event included six classrooms, two from each grade (Grade 3-5), where the pre-service elementary teachers facilitated a science lesson that included a 4-station hands-on, minds-on activity. All of the pre-service elementary teachers who participated in the performance final found the "Science Friday" experience to be a "value added" experience that positively impacted their perception of their science teaching self-efficacy.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will leave this poster session with knowledge of how to implement a performance-based final within a science methods course that effectively promotes the science teaching self-efficacy of pre-service elementary teachers.

SPEAKERS:
Trish Arnold (Minnesota State University, Mankato: Mankato, MN)

NMLSTA-Don’t Cross the Streams; Assessment Literacy in the Inquiry-Based Classroom

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 B


STRAND: Research to Practice

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Based on the work of Andrew Ho and Margaret Heritage, this session will outline the four major “quadrants” of the assessment matrix and review the nature and the stakeholders for each. We focus then on the process of moving from a structured Formative Assessment Process to an Invisible Formative Assessment Process, and benchmarks for delivering high-quality assessment alongside high-quality instruction.

Lastly, we will focus on the NGSS specific requirements for classroom-based assessment and align it to the Herron scale of inquiry to ensure that our assessment process is inclined in the same direction as our instruction.

TAKEAWAYS:
Implementation of inquiry-based standards and the shift to a more inquiry-based classroom requires a clear vision of the assessment opportunities and processes classroom teachers will need to engage in and administrators will need to support and review.

SPEAKERS:
John White (Breakthrough Technologies: , IL)

“How to Cook a Turkey”: Students’ Misconceptions in Science, What We Assume vs. What They Think

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA-KC, Oct. 2023, How to Cook a Turkey”, Students' MIsconceptions..... upload.pptx

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Our students make sense of science and construct their ideas from many experiences, then use that “knowledge” as a foundation for their learning. However, it may not always be a solid foundation. We can help students develop their science knowledge through a deeper understanding of the misconceptions they hold, using phenomena, observation, sensemaking, and robust assessment. We can then assess students’ ideas and misconceptions in the sciences at various grade levels creating and using research-based assessments, understanding the importance of including their ideas in those assessments. When each item contains a choice between a scientifically correct answer and a common, widely-held, student misconception, we can more accurately evaluate our students’ true understanding of the DCI components of the NGSS.

TAKEAWAYS:
Educators will learn how to work with misconceptions that students hold in order to incorporate those into useful assessments. Use students’ sensemaking to discover ways to get at those ideas, and share your students’ misconceptions, hear others as well, and build research-based assessments.

SPEAKERS:
Cynthia Crockett (Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian: Cambridge, MA)

Compacting Curriculum in Junior High Science

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2204


STRAND: Research to Practice

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Curriculum compacting replaces content that students already know with new content, enrichment options, or other activities. It can be effective for: students who have already mastered the material and those students that may learn material quickly. Research shows that students who received compacted curriculum scored significantly higher on achievement posttests than their peers who received "all of the work" with no compacting. On my team, we compacted curriculum for several units last year and our mastery scores drastically improved on STAAR from prior years. Compacted curriculum allowed our GT (and advanced) learners to have an opportunity for enrichment rather than learning things they already knew. Participants will be receiving resources and examples of curriculum compacting in science. They are encouraged to ask questions throughout. During the session, attendees can look at their own curriculum to determine where in their science units (and when) they could try compacting.

TAKEAWAYS:
1) Attendees will learn WHAT Curriculum Compacting is and WHY it is so important in the science classroom. 2) Attendees will be shown HOW to begin compacting in their classrooms. 3) Attendees will walk away with resources to help them begin compacting, and will be given opportunities to ask questions.

SPEAKERS:
Sandra Rodriguez (Katy ISD: Katy, TX)

Improving Pre-Engineering and Computer Science Education through Micro-Credentials: Key Learning from a State Agency

Saturday, October 28 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2201


STRAND: Research to Practice

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In 2019, The Louisiana Department of Education was awarded an Education, Innovation, and Research(EIR) grant titled “Improving Pre-Engineering and Computer Science Education through Micro-Credentials”. As one of very few EIR grants awarded to a state education agency, we have had the opportunity to blend both research and practice through multiple lenses as we engage teachers and students across our state. The project has served as a mechanism for the research team to examine how job embedded professional development impacts the practices of our teachers, the content delivery in our classrooms, and its effects on student learning. We plan to share key take aways, including insights into the writing and revision process, how the series took shape over time, and preliminary outcomes from the qualitative measures utilized. This may be of interest to participants considering portfolio based assessments as a means of improving professional learning within their own context.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will gain insight from the perspective of a state agency into the process and key learnings from a four-year project focused on portfolio-based assessments in STEM.

SPEAKERS:
John Underwood (Louisiana Dept. of Education: Baton Rouge, LA)

More than a Score: Three Practical Strategies for Maximizing Assessment

Saturday, October 28 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 1501 B


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: Stile Education

N/A

SPEAKERS:
Shawna Jensen (Stile Education: Portland, OR)

Teaching Science with Superheroes: Engage Students with Illustrations from Movies, TV, Comics, and More!

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2104 A


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Student engagement is a vital element for effective science instruction (Heddy & Sinatra, 2013). However, students typically become less engaged in science as they advance in school years (Ofsted, 2015). Superheroes have been a mainstay in popular culture and multimedia for decades. Science teachers can harness this widespread interest to enhance lessons, broaden assessments, and increase student engagement. Participants will examine multiple superhero examples, each with applications to specific NGSS performance expectations. They will also consider research content from science journals and organizations (National Geographic, Scientific American, NASA, NOAA, WHO, etc.) to catalyze further exploration and extensions. In addition to specific activities, teachers will practice analyzing popular culture and research for wider engagement. They will also review important copyright parameters and “fair use” in the classroom, with an emphasis on appropriate implementation.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants in this interactive session will examine a variety of multimedia superhero examples, with a focus on immediate classroom implementation AND legal copyright “fair use.” In addition to specific lessons, teachers will practice analyzing and applying media and research to engage students.

SPEAKERS:
Daniel Bergman (Wichita State University: Wichita, KS)

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