2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

All sessions added to My Agenda prior to this notice have been exported to the mobile app and will be visible in your account when the app launches. Any sessions added now, will also have to be added in the app.
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Rooms and times subject to change.
71 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Physically Active Modeling For Comparing States of Matter

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2104 A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Ideal Gas Law Students as Particles Activity Handout.docx
Physically Active Modeling Ideal Gas Laws Lesson Plan.docx
Physically Active Modeling States of Matter (1).pptx
Physically Active Modeling States of Matter Blank Handout NSTA 2023 .docx
Physically Active Modeling States of Matter Slides Handout NSTA 2023 KC.docx
QR Code Physically Active Modeling For States Of Matter NSTA 2023.png

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

This activity has students/participants act as particles. To start, participants are given baseline information about how attractive forces between particles can vary from very strong to negligible, & that particles are always in motion. Participants then split into three groups, strong, moderate, & weak forces. To model very strong forces participants link arms at the elbow, for moderately strong forces they hold hands, & for weak/negligible forces they can only hold each other’s pinky fingers. Participants start far apart & move very slowly to model a very cold temperature. At this speed, all of the participants are able to catch onto each other & form an organized structure (solid). With each iteration the participants move faster; this results in the weak-force group not being able to form a structure (gas), the moderate-force group being clumped together but not organized (liquid), & the strong-force group still being able to form an organized structure (solid).

TAKEAWAYS:
Students will not only know the properties of solids, liquids, and gasses, but will be able to give in-depth explanations as to WHY the properties are different by behaving as the particles at different temperatures and with different attractive forces.

SPEAKERS:
Clark Ellis (The Kinkaid School)

Forms of Energy & Energy Transformations Interactive Lessons

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 A


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Participants will learn about forms of energy and their transformations by experimenting through six stations. Stations cover potential and kinetic energy, endothermic and exothermic processes, radiant energy, thermal and motion energy, chemical energy, and electrical energy. Within each, there are multiple activities to showcase the energy transformations occurring. The stations will be set up with materials needed, a hypothesis prompt, procedure list, and a station guide for recording data. For example, a yo-yo stores gravitational potential energy when it is in your hand until it drops. When it drops, the yo-yo transforms the potential energy into motion. At the end of experimenting, participants will review a “What’s Happening” sheet that explains what form of energy and energy transformation occurred in that station, as well as how it’s tied to the real-world applications. NEED activities are free and easily differentiated at the elementary, intermediate, and secondary level.

TAKEAWAYS:
How to help students master forms of energy and their transformations and how it can be visualized in the world around them.

SPEAKERS:
Don Pruett, Jr. (Washington Science Teachers Association: Everett, WA)

I’ll Have Another Drink…And Another…And Another... A 3-D Lesson to Investigate and Make Sense of the Drinking Bird Phenomenon

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The drinking bird is a classic heat engine toy that has been featured in popular culture. Although the cause-and-effect relationship for this phenomenon is clear, the mechanism for its repetitive movement is puzzling for most students. In this workshop, participants will use investigative and sensemaking practices to explore the drinking bird phenomenon. This interactive 3-D lesson is in alignment with the goals, standards, and practices of the NGSS. In addition, tips to enhance the development and use of student explanatory models will be featured.

TAKEAWAYS:
Workshop participants will experience an interactive and engaging three-dimensional lesson that is in alignment with the goals and practices of the Next Generation Science Standards. In addition, tips to enhance the development and use of student-created explanatory models will be featured.

SPEAKERS:
Bryan Horan (Northport - East Northport UFSD: Northport, NY)

Creating Chemistry Storylines Using Digital Interactive Notebooks

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Basie Ballroom C



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Creating Chemistry Storylines using Digital Interactive Notebooks.pdf
NSTA 2023 Phenomenon Based Ionic Bonding DICNB 2023 - 2024

STRAND: Tech Tools

Show Details

Over the last few years, access to digital resources to capture student understanding of chemistry concepts has greatly increased. This technological shift, along with a focus on the use of storylines to engage students in chemistry, provides an opportunity to implement digital interactive notebooks. Through the use of various on-line platforms, student beliefs and understanding can be documented and tracked over the course of a storyline. Digital notebooking is a dynamic process that integrates different learning experiences to challenge and reinforce student understanding. This method actively engages students in a manner that encourages discussion and collaboration. Support is built into the digital notebook for absent students and those that need additional resources to understand a concept. This session provides an overview of the digital interactive notebook creation, along with guidance for educators to take this process and use phenomena relevant to their students.

TAKEAWAYS:
This session will provide a brief overview of how I use digital interactive notebooks in my classroom, along with guidance on how educators can begin the process of building their own. Resources and editable chemistry notebooks will be shared that focus on different chemistry phenomena.

SPEAKERS:
Sarah English (Sweet Home High School: Amherst, NY)

Implementation and Insights into the Addition of SEP3 Planning and Carrying Out Investigations in a Chemistry Classroom

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Basie Ballroom C



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Google Slide Deck

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

After the pandemic, we wanted to bring in as many hands-on, real-life chemistry experiences to our students as possible. After watching labs through a screen and sending materials home, our team had a new passion to get as many labs and investigations in as possible! What that passion evolved into was working on non-traditional assessments that required students to plan and carry out an experiment for an assessment in addition to the labs during class time instead of the traditional “in your seat” with paper and pencil assessment. We wanted to give our assessment meaning and bring purpose back to the labs. Presenters will share several different formats that we have tried as we went through year one of implementing SEP3 Planning and Carrying Out an Investigation.

TAKEAWAYS:
Presenters will share how they developed non-traditional assessments related to SEP3 Planning and Carrying Out Investigations in their standards-based grading chemistry curriculum. Presenters will share recommendations/challenges for teachers to think about as they implement SEP3 in their classrooms.

SPEAKERS:
Nathan Gustin (Adlai E. Stevenson High School: Lincolnshire, IL), Karen O'Connor (Adlai E. Stevenson High School: Lincolnshire, IL), Ashley Rose (Adlai E. Stevenson High School: Lincolnshire, IL), John Deppong (Adlai E. Stevenson High School: Lincolnshire, IL), Kristen One (Adlai E. Stevenson High School: Lincolnshire, IL)

TikTok: Using Social Media to Build Relationships and Teach Content

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Big Joe Turner B


STRAND: Tech Tools

Show Details

TikTok is all the rage, and student spend a large amount of time on TikTok. Because of this, students do not always like traditional methods of receiving information (notes, lectures, demonstrations, labs). Additionally, according to Pew Research, 26% of 18-29 years old get their news (whether accurate or inaccurate) on TikTok. This number is probably higher for younger ages. Because students spend so much time on TikTok, they are used to getting short (less than 1 min) snippets of information in an engaging environment. In order to better serve our students, educators need to know how to use TikTok to their advantage to inform students. Tiktok can be used to share information with students (as photos or videos) and can serve as a great tool for formative and summative assessments (i.e.: students sharing information about their experimental results, taking polls, analyzing other TikTok's for their educational value).

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how to use TikTok for educational purposes; including disseminating information to students via TikTok and using TikTok as a formative and summative assessment tool for high school and post-secondary students.

SPEAKERS:
Kelsey Mescher (Battle High School: Columbia, MO), Stephanie Coyle (Jefferson Middle School: Columbia, MO)

Glow Labs: Study DNA Structure and Enzyme Activity Using Fluorescence

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2504 B


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: miniPCR bio

Discover a new way to study DNA and enzymes! Use fluorescence to see changes to DNA structure and enzyme activity with your own eyes. Explore how temperature, pH, and genetic sequence affect DNA base pairing. Then, see inhibitors, concentration, temperature, and pH affect enzymatic reaction rates.

SPEAKERS:
Allison Nishitani, PhD (miniPCR: Cambridge, MA)

Why are oysters dying and how can we use chemistry to protect them? Using chemistry to solve ESS problems

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Basie Ballroom A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA23 KC - C.4 Chemical Reactions in our World Webinar September 2023 (1).pdf
Additional materials may be found using the following link: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1AIM1naKisNQng5r-fuUrs-FEUEhlrync?usp=sharing

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

OpenSciEd Chemistry units use a justice-centered storyline approach to help students figure out answers to their questions. The central focus of the Oysters unit is food sovereignty engineering design: how can people reclaim important foods that they’ve lost due to colonization and ecosystem disruption? In this session, participants will experience portions of the unit’s anchor in “student hat” before reviewing the unit as a whole in teacher hat. Participants will see how students develop engineering design solutions using NGSS-aligned chemistry and Earth and space science models and practices including the carbon cycle, acid-base interactions, reversible reactions, and stoichiometry (scale, proportion, & quantity). These lessons include testing pH of various solutions and concentration; using mathematical thinking to inform design solutions; and identifying how humans have impacted the carbon cycle.

TAKEAWAYS:
This unit supports students as they figure out understandings of reversible reactions through explaining changes in ocean chemistry to engineer solutions to prevent oyster die offs. Participants will see how students build these ideas and develop mathematical thinking throughout the unit.

SPEAKERS:
Nicole Vick (Northwestern University), Kerri Wingert (Good Question Research: Boulder, CO)

Using Modeling to Support Chemistry Storylines

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Basie Ballroom C


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Models engage students, promote critical thinking, and help students connect abstract concepts to real-world phenomena. This session will promote using the science and engineering practice of developing and using models as a technique to explore concepts, promote sense making, and demonstrate student understanding. Presenters will include modeling techniques that have been successfully used in both rural and urban chemistry classrooms to help students better understand complex concepts within storyline units. The use of simulations, hands-on activities, physical manipulatives, drawings, and technology will be demonstrated. The benefits of models used as an equitable tool will be examined using student data and examples. Sample chemistry storylines will be used to show how student coherence builds throughout the unit with the use of models. Strategies for teachers will be provided to help students develop better models, and a discussion of formative assessment value will be stressed.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will leave with various modeling strategies to implement into their chemistry courses. This will promote student sensemaking and more equitable evaluations of student ideas.

SPEAKERS:
Jennifer Jones (Ogallala High School: Ogallala, NE), Christine Gustafson (Millard South High School: Omaha, NE)

Upgrading Science with Artificial Intelligence

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Andy Kirk


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Seckinger High School utilizes an Artificial Intelligence framework that is incorporated into every subject. The framework will be shared with a see-think-wonder protocol. Participants will work through 3 sample lessons integrating parts of the framework. The Biology lesson will feature 3 uses of generative text models for learning: analysis of generated text for accuracy, creation of generative images for student productivity, and use of generative text models for creative problem-solving and student ideation. For the Chemistry lesson, students will use PASCO probes, along with their knowledge of acids and bases, chemical bonding, and properties to design a solution to a real-world problem. The Physics lesson will use an inquiry-based investigation to discover the coefficient of friction while comparing data between a spring scale and PASCO probes. Participants will receive hard copies of handouts and access to all digital resources.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how to “upgrade” their lessons as education continues to move into the phase of artificial intelligence.

SPEAKERS:
Holly Hall (Seckinger High School: No City, No State), Natasaskia Wayne (Gwinnett County Public Schools: No City, No State), Krystal Shearon (Seckinger High School)

VSEPR in the 21st Century: Using Coding, SIMS, and Rovers

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Big Joe Turner B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
VSEPR NSTA KC.pptx

STRAND: Tech Tools

Show Details

Using the standard model kits for inspiration, attendees will see how using simulations for 3-D modeling of molecular geometry can help students "see" the unseen. Taking this knowledge, attendees will code a rover to draw the molecular shapes using simple and easy coding commands. NO EXPERIENCE REQUIRED! Student's will be exposed to not only molecular geometry, but will also tie in mathematical geometry with the use of interior and exterior angles for their shapes.

TAKEAWAYS:
Give students new ways to visualize molecular geometry while integrating coding into the science classroom and maybe learning a little geometry!

SPEAKERS:
Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA), Chris Coker (Camden Fairview High School: Camden, AR)

Expanding STEM and Health Science Opportunities: California Northstate University's Outreach Programs Empowering Middle and High School Students and Teachers

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2201


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

California Northstate University College of Health Sciences offers several outreach programs supporting middle and high school students and teachers. Our outreach goals are to expand opportunities, interest, and awareness for students interested in pursuing careers in the STEM and health science professions and to increase and diversify the pipeline of students with access to these career opportunities. Currently, we have 3 active outreach programs engaging the regional communities: Biology Education to Careers, Institute for Chemistry and Physics for Middle School Science Teachers, and Student Powered Activities for Reach Knowledge. Over 400 students have participated in our various outreach programs, and we have added over 50 educators to our training network. Our regional community school affiliations have grown to over 30. By sharing our outreach experiences, we hope to inspire educators in engaging their regional communities about careers in STEM and health science professions.

TAKEAWAYS:
California Northstate University is dedicated to sharing insights gained from developing and implementing our outreach programs and to offer guidance for educators and institutions that seek to engage their local communities about careers in STEM and health sciences.

SPEAKERS:
Allan Ancheta (California Northstate University: Rancho Cordova, CA)

Building Depth Through Storylines: Why Can’t We Walk Through Walls?

Friday, October 27 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2505 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: Savvas Learning Company

N/A

SPEAKERS:
Christopher Moore (University of Nebraska Omaha: Omaha, NE)

Keep Calm and Chemistry On: Successful Lab Activities for the New Chemistry Teacher

Friday, October 27 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2505 B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: Carolina Biological Supply Co.

Explore easy, engaging, and safe chemistry activities that guarantee a reaction in your students. Whether you’re new to chemistry or feeling out of your element, create excitement with hands-on labs and demonstrations.

SPEAKERS:
Laurie Nixon (Watauga High School: Boone, NC)

Teaching Chemistry in a Post-Pandemic World: Strategies That Increase Engagement, Performance and Equity

Friday, October 27 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA 2023 Poster Presentation.pptx
Poster Presentation NSTA 2023 KC

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Student engagement and performance in science and math, especially in underserved populations, have declined as a result of the pandemic and the switch to remote learning. Traditional teaching methods have had to evolve in the face of these new challenges. This work describes how project-based learning (PBL) is woven into the scope and sequence of high school Chemistry. Assessment is a departure from a points-based to a standards-based grading system. Students are evaluated based on their mastery of four different standards: inquiry, design, analysis, and communication. Examinations that test for content are enhanced with inquiry-based problems that connect Chemistry to real life. Students are expected to take responsibility for their own performance, to seek help when needed and to advocate for themselves. The work presented will include classroom strategies, project ideas that promote equity, and samples of assessments and student work.

TAKEAWAYS:
The work presented will include classroom strategies and project-based learning ideas with samples of student work. It describes a standards-based assessment that focuses on the acquisition and mastery of skills as an alternative to a traditional points-based grading system.

SPEAKERS:
Caroline Gochoco-Tsuyuki (Archbishop Riordan High School: San Francisco, CA)

The "Foot-to-Hand" Research Project: Is There a Correlation Between Hand and Foot Length?

Friday, October 27 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Poster NSTA Foot-to-hand Handout.pdf

STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Is there a correlation between the length of someone’s hand and shoe size? While this may seem like a silly question, we've developed a full research project called the "Foot-to-Hand Ratio." This research project uniquely exposes students to units of measurement, dimensional analysis, and research. Over a period of years, a class of 24 students completed this research project. Students measured the length of one hand, one foot, and their height. Then they calculated their Foot-to-Hand, Height-to-Foot, and Height-to-Hand ratios. Surprisingly, there was a direct correlation between the hand and foot length, and height and hand, or foot, length. In addition, students used statistics to dismiss "outliers" in the data.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will have access to a new, simple research project that incorporates mathematics.

SPEAKERS:
Sharron Jenkins (Georgia Gwinnett College: Lawrenceville, GA)

Standards Based Grading for Equity in HS Chemistry

Friday, October 27 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Standards-based grading shifts the focus from traditional grades to a mastery of specific learning objectives. SBG is a comprehensive approach that focuses on identifying and communicating clear learning objectives to students and assessing their progress based on these objectives. We will discuss how SBG can be used in a chemistry classroom to promote student learning outcomes throughout sample storylines. We will explore the benefits of using SBG, including increased student engagement, motivation, and ownership of learning. We will also discuss the challenges of implementing SBG and strategies to overcome them. By attending this presentation, chemistry educators will gain a better understanding of how SBG can promote student learning outcomes for ALL students in their classrooms. They will also gain practical ideas and strategies for implementing SBG in their own chemistry classrooms.

TAKEAWAYS:
Standards-based grading doesn't have to be scary or time intensive. Teachers will learn how SBG strategies can be used in the classroom to make assessing NGSS storylines equitable and centered on learning.

SPEAKERS:
Christine Gustafson (Millard South High School: Omaha, NE)

Just-in-time Teaching in Chemistry

Friday, October 27 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Research has proved that active learning is more effective than traditional lectures. However, active learning requires additional support in addition to textbooks. For example, POGIL needs workbooks to assist students' learning. Flipped classroom needs clickers to collect students' responses. This talk will discuss what kind of support is required by active learning, specifically for flipped classroom and Just-in-time learning from practice standpoint and technology standpoint. After the presentation, the attendees will be able to design their own material for their classroom teaching. The webtool to implement the active learning strategy will also be introduced. After the presentation, the attendees will have skills to design their own material for their classroom teaching. For example, the attendee can prepare teaching material before class, during class and after class for flipped classroom and Just-in-time learning.

TAKEAWAYS:
The audience is expected to implement Just-in-time-teaching in their own classroom to teach chemistry.

SPEAKERS:
Jack Huang (associate professor: Jacksonville, FL)

Incorporating Earth and Space Science NGSS Core Ideas into Chemistry

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Lester Young A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Most students in Missouri only take physical and life sciences to graduate leaving the Earth & Space Science strands of NGSS untouched. Most educators, additionally, do not have a strong enough earth & space science background to integrate these strands into their science classes. However, most of these Earth and Science strands can easily be adapted into a high school chemistry class (and biology, although my background is in chemistry) without having to give up core content. In this presentation, educators will be do a wet lab (Cleaning Up an Ocean Oil Spill) and receive access to additional labs (precipitation lab, acid rain lab, and viscosity of volcanoes) that meet the basic general chemistry class standards (PS NGSS strands) and incorporate earth and space sciences. Attendees will also learn of additional resources such as Gizmos and NASA that can be incorporated and hit the ESS science standards. Lastly, attendees will learn of books and resources for them to learn more.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn how to integrate the Earth & Space standards into a basic chemistry high school class. Resources can be adapted for biology and middle school levels.

SPEAKERS:
Stephanie Coyle (Jefferson Middle School: Columbia, MO)

The Chemistry and Statistics of the U.S. Penny

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Big Joe Turner B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

How can we assess the quality of sampling and variability of the data to help us in decision-making? The various metals and alloys used in the minting of the penny over the years will provide for rich explorations, which are part of the chemistry curriculum. We will highlight the important cross-disciplinary aspect, linking the science content (mass/chemical composition) to the mathematical models outlined in the NGSS section on Systems and Models to show how to use it to simulate systems and interactions. Through hands-on activities and the use of technology, participants will explore a variety of data sets and use this knowledge to better understand and use statistics to make accurate and fair arguments related to everyday topics. We will explore how the sample mean varies from sample to sample. While this is considered one of the more challenging topics for quality control, we will illustrate the concepts though some basic sampling of the typical age and mass of the U.S. penny.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will use real data to develop mathematical models and learn how to test our hypothesis by performing an experiment and analyzing the results, combining chemical analysis with statistical sampling for a cross-curricular approach.

SPEAKERS:
Karlheinz Haas (Science/Math Instructor, Retired: Tequesta, FL)

Experiencing Science by Using Scientific Theater

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Colonial Ballroom



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
AP Biology Theater Evolution Edition.docx
Biology Theater AP Ecology Edition.docx
Biology Theater Cell Signaling Edition.docx
Biology Theater Molecular DNA edition.docx
Chem Theater Example #1.pdf
Chem Theater Example #2.pdf
Chem Theater Example #3.pdf
Chem Theater Example #4.pdf
Chemistry Theater Acids and Bases AP Edition.docx
Chemistry Theater Acids and Bases.docx
Chemistry Theater AP Solutions Edition.docx
Chemistry Theater Bonding.docx
Instructions for Chemistry Theater NSTA.docx

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Scientific Theater might seem like an oxymoron, but over my decade-plus in high school education, it has become a favorite of my students. The goals of this experience are to encourage the attendees/students to be creative in trying to explain sometimes complicated concepts, and to realize that written words and slide presentations are not the only way to explain something. In this workshop, attendees will be given the opportunity to experience Scientific Theater exactly as my students do, by creating their own one-act play explaining a chemical concept. The concept may be one of their own choosing, or there will be several to choose from. After choosing, attendees will split into groups of four, at which point they will collaborate to develop and write a 3-minute play that they best feel illustrates their concept. At the end of the session, volunteer groups will be invited to perform, and it is hoped that the attendees will have seen theater as the powerful and enjoyable tool it is.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will collaborate to create their own plays to describe a scientific concept. After discussion and rehearsal, volunteers will be asked to perform their masterpieces in front of the group. By doing so, attendees will be able to take what they have learned back to their classrooms.

SPEAKERS:
Karen Flummerfelt (Downtown Magnets High School: Los Angeles, CA)

Brain Based Instruction: Using Cognitive Psychology to Boost Science Learning

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Truman B


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

How much assistance should teachers provide to learners and how should they schedule it? When should teachers mix together different kinds of practice problems? Are mnemonics useful? The pragmatic answers to these questions provided by cognitive science tap the innate strengths of human brain systems and have been shown to improve students' ability to retrieve and apply information. I will synthesize and present data about the effectiveness of a variety of different general learning strategies. I will utilize a variety of fun and engaging demonstrations of cognitive phenomena to help teachers understand and learn how to use these cognitive learning strategies. For example, attendees will try to remember new facts through self-testing or re-studying. I will interpret the results of the cognitive demonstrations, connect the results to existing lab-based and classroom data, and explain the brain-based mechanisms behind the effects.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how to apply multiple practical, flexible, and research-based cognitive strategies, including retrieving information from memory, distributing practice across time, scaffolding, and mixing together different examples, within their own classrooms to improve student learning.

SPEAKERS:
Jonathan Tullis (The University of Arizona: Tucson, AZ)

Colorful Chemical Kinetics

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2503 A


Show Details

Sponsoring Company: Vernier Science Education

Find out how you can use a simple reaction between food color and bleach to teach reaction kinetics. Learn how to select the best wavelength on a spectrometer, analyze the data to determine the rate constant, and write the rate expression. Collect data on your own device or use one of ours!

SPEAKERS:
Nüsret Hisim (Vernier Science Education: Beaverton, OR)

Re-remembering and re-affirming why we became teachers in the first place

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2505 A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Wysession_NSTA_ReaffirmationOfTeaching.pdf
Slides on the importance of teaching science and how that provide for a satisfying and meaningful career.

STRAND: Leadership and Advocacy

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: Savvas Learning Company

Join Professor Michael Wysession in an inspirational session to reconnect you with the reasons you chose teaching as your profession. Through the lens of a modernized ancient concept (the Japanese “Ikigai”), participants will reflect on their teaching careers and rediscover the rewards (personal, societal, financial) of the teaching profession.

SPEAKERS:
Michael Wysession (Washington University in St. Louis: Saint Louis, MO)

Crafting Three-Dimensional Multiple Choice Questions & More

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Mary Lou Williams



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Presentation
Revision History of Written Assessment

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

I will take participants through my process of crafting sets of formative multiple choice questions that each use 2 of the 3 dimensions of NGSS, so that all dimensions are addressed. I will also show my process for refining free response questions to get the exact responses I am looking for and that allow for an ease of grading and seeing students’ understanding. I will provide examples from my own classroom & direct them to where they can find more examples from various storylines. As an iHub Chemistry writer, I learned to write 3-D multiple choice formative questions. An assessment graduate course taught me how to write quality distractors to see limits of student understanding and get useful feedback data. I merge these 2 in my own classroom to create assessments to get to what my students know. I will share my learning from these trainings and more to set teachers on the path to quality 3-D classroom assessments.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn to craft three-dimensional assessments, multiple choice, and free response. Using quality distractors in multiple choice formatives allows you to pinpoint student misconceptions. Free response questions direct students to the specific response you want so that grading goes quicker.

SPEAKERS:
Sarah Evans (Olathe South High School: Olathe, KS)

Charting the Course with uBEATS (a FREE Interactive STEM Resource)

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Big Joe Turner A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
uBEATS Module Sample Lesson Plans
uBEATS PowerPoint Presentation

STRAND: Tech Tools

Show Details

Content for our presentation includes: Opening-Introduction, History and Background of uBEATS, Highlights of the Program, Standards Alignment to NGSS and NCHSE, and a Canvas course walk-through Activity-In this activity portion, we will be taking a “Deep Dive” into uBEATS. We will preview a selected sample Freshman biology unit (Cellular Biology) and show specific modules that could be integrated into that unit of study (Cellular Structure and Function, Mitosis, and Cancer). The modules used in this preview will provide two different interactive activities that we will complete together while viewing them in the module. These modules will provide a review of core content, provide an extension to the core content, and bring in a career connection (Careers in Medical Imaging and Therapeutic Sciences). Closing-Register, Module Preview, social media, Podcast

TAKEAWAYS:
In this session, attendees will walk away with a clear understanding of what uBEATS is, how to effectively use this resource, and be fully prepared for implementation in their classrooms.

SPEAKERS:
Zuzi Greiner (Instructional Technologist)

Do Your Students Really Understand Chemical Equilibrium?

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Basie Ballroom C


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Chemical equilibrium is a central topic to the understanding of both Chemistry and Biology, yet students have many misconceptions. The NGSS standard HS PS1-6 covers this important topic. In a recent AP Chemistry Exam, the vast majority of students did poorly on the topic and had misconceptions about equilibrium; 73 % of the students received a zero or had no response to the equilibrium question. Students are most familiar with equilibrium problems and experiments where the K value is small; usually less than one. Exam questions dealing with a large K value cause the majority of students to do poorly. In this presentation, participants will take part in a “hands-on” inquiry activity with an equilibrium having a large K value. Participants will learn methods to overcome student misconceptions of equilibrium. Join this workshop to take an inquiry lab back to use in your classroom. Handouts will be provided. There will be time allotted for participant questions.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn to use Inquiry to overcome student misconceptions about chemical equilibrium.

SPEAKERS:
Gregory Dodd (Retired Chemistry Teacher: Pennsboro, WV)

Stepping into the shoes of a radiologist: isotopes, medicine, and cell division

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Lester Young B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Slides (for use with students)
Student handout

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Engage your students with a real-world application of physical sciences and biology through our scaffolded nuclear radiology case study. Nuclear medicine is a branch of radiology that uses radioactive materials to diagnose and treat disease. The purpose of this session is to introduce students to medical imaging and nuclear medicine alongside Next Generation Science Standards as they attempt to diagnose and treat a hypothetical patient. In addition to fostering critical thinking, this session connects FDG-PET (a type of nuclear imaging) to the following next generation science standards: 1) Develop models to illustrate the changes in the composition of the nucleus of the atom and the energy released during … fission, fusion, and radioactive decay. (HS-PS1-8), and 2) Use a model to illustrate the role of cellular division (mitosis) and differentiation in producing and maintaining complex organisms. (HS-LS1-4).

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will feel prepared to incorporate a nuclear radiology problem-based learning activity (developed by a radiologist and science teacher team) into their own classrooms!

SPEAKERS:
Peter Gunderman (Radiologist), Tina Ahmadi (PhD Student: Indianapolis, IN)

Why did the acid go to the gym? To become a little buffer!

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Big Joe Turner B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Why did the acid to go the gym_ To be a little buffer. (1).pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Teachers will explore a data collection activity to investigate pH and a pH titration curve. Teachers will also explore a variety of card sorts, hands-on activities to model acid base chemistry as well as the application of buffers in real world situations.

TAKEAWAYS:
Acid base chemistry and buffers are difficult concepts for students to grasp. This session will help teachers create and modify traditional lecture activities to be student-centered, hands-on learning opportunities.

SPEAKERS:
Chris Coker (Camden Fairview High School: Camden, AR), Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA)

Integrating Art in a High School Chemistry Class

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Colonial Ballroom



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Integrating Art in High School Chemistry

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Presenters will share student work which showcases art and creativity in the chemistry classroom. Stop-motion videos can be used to show what is happening at the particulate level for different types of chemical reactions, bond enthalpy calculations, and electron excitation in light emission. TV theme song parodies can be used as a way to assess student understanding of a variety of chemistry topics. Sketchnotes can be incorporated to demonstrate knowledge of a particular lab, chemistry unit or short article which pertains to the topic being covered in class. Students also write children's books to showcase their understanding of climate change and ocean acidification. Finally, lab based art projects are a fun way to begin or end a unit of study and the student work can then be displayed in the classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will leave with a variety of ideas about how to incorporate sketchnotes, stop-motion videos, songs, painting, and storytelling into their chemistry classrooms.

SPEAKERS:
Nathan Gustin (Adlai E. Stevenson High School: Lincolnshire, IL), Ashley Rose (Adlai E. Stevenson High School: Lincolnshire, IL)

Stoichiometry: Tools and Tips for Improving Student Understanding

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2502 A


Show Details

Sponsoring Company: PASCO

Help students develop a better understanding of mole ratios, stoichiometry, and limiting reactants through this hands-on activity using household chemicals and a Wireless Pressure Sensor.

The Science Table by Anatomage – Introducing a High-Tech, Interactive, and Collaborative Platform to Your Classroom

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2210


STRAND: Tech Tools

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: Anatomage, Inc.

The Science Table by Anatomage provides a library of biology, chemistry, and physics experiments with realistic-quality visuals and an interactive touchscreen experience. The workshop will focus on incorporating the Science Table into middle school, high school, and college-level classrooms.

Lord of the Probes!

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2503 B


STRAND: Tech Tools

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: Texas Instruments

The King of all sensors in most science departments is the temperature probe. Probes make it easier for students to quickly and reliably collect data so they can spend more time making sense of it. Come to this hands-on session and interact with, "The Lord of the Probes!"

COVID-19, Monkeypox, and other New and Emerging Infectious Diseases

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2505 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: Savvas Learning Company

N/A

SPEAKERS:
Joseph Levine (Science Writer and Producer: Concord, MA)

Evaluating Student Work in the Science Classroom: Standards-Based Scoring & Teacher Calibration

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Jay McShann A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Google Slide Deck

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Making the move from a traditional grading system to a standards based grading system can be an overwhelming task. It was especially challenging for two of Stevenson High School’s largest teams: AP biology (10 teachers) and accelerated chemistry (18 teachers). We will share how we came up with our standards and our success criteria for teaching skills and scoring student work. We will also share how those standards and success criteria have changed over the last four years. Attendees will be able to view our assessments, look at student work, and then score sample assessments. Presenters will also share several different calibration strategies that have worked for our larger team, ranging from Google jamboards, Google slides, and Google forms.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will walk away with a scaffolded way to determine the skills they want to assess in their course and how they can begin to develop success criteria. Attendees will also take away some strategies for how to calibrate their scoring.

SPEAKERS:
Kristen One (Adlai E. Stevenson High School: Lincolnshire, IL), Nathan Gustin (Adlai E. Stevenson High School: Lincolnshire, IL), Karen O'Connor (Adlai E. Stevenson High School: Lincolnshire, IL)

It's Electric! Figuring Out the Structure and Properties of Matter through Lightning

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Basie Ballroom A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
It's Electric! Figuring Out the Structure and Properties of Matter through Lightning.pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

OpenSciEd Chemistry units use a storyline approach to help students figure out answers to their questions in a three-dimensional, coherent, and equitable way. In this session, participants will experience that approach firsthand as they engage with the unit’s anchor in "student hat", experiencing the content as students do in the classroom. Participants will also see how students develop understanding of atomic structure and electrostatic forces through a coherent series of investigations. These investigations include using a Kelvin water dropper and everyday items to reason about static electricity; using simulations and physical models to build understanding of atomic structure and charge transfer; measuring forces of attraction and repulsion to derive Coulomb's Law; and measuring electric current in solutions of different salinity to determine how salts are able to conduct electricity in aqueous solution.

TAKEAWAYS:
This unit supports students as they figure out understandings of atomic structure, charge, and the role of matter, forces, and energy in lightning. Participants will see how students build these ideas through a series of investigations.

SPEAKERS:
Dan Voss (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Kerri Wingert (Good Question Research: Boulder, CO), Rachel Patton (Denver Public Schools)

Incorporating Wet Labs and Writing to Assess Higher Order Thinking of Chemistry Concepts

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Basie Ballroom C


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

This session will provide two example wet lab assessments and information to design one for the general and college/AP chemistry classroom. Both labs were our summative assessment for our molecular structures unit (topics: polarity, intermolecular forces, Lewis structures) and our measuring matter unit (topics: density, metric units, relationship between mass, volume, and temperature). For the molecular structure unit assessment, students determined the polarity of acetone, water, ethanol, and vegetable oil by testing solubility, evaporation rate, surface tension, and drawing Lewis structures. Students wrote a CER to classify each compound as polar or nonpolar. For our measuring matter lab assessment, students had an unknown metal or liquid and had to calculate density and classify the unknown substance and wrote a short CER. Grading can be traditional or SRG.

TAKEAWAYS:
There are numerous ways to assess besides traditional paper and pencil tests in chemistry. This session will focus on using labs and writing CERs based on lab data as an assessment for concepts.

SPEAKERS:
Kelsey Mescher (Battle High School: Columbia, MO), Stephanie Coyle (Jefferson Middle School: Columbia, MO)

The Students and the Standards Have Changed, Have You?

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Basie Ballroom B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

This presentation will involve a Google Slide show detailing why some of our beloved labs do not meet the NGSS standards and how we can adjust these labs through phenomena, critical thinking questions, CER, and rubrics to meet those standards. Furthermore, this presentation's primary purpose is to highlight why we struggle with "students today." It is a fact that students have changed; we expect students to change. It's the fact that we as educators have not adapted to the students that are in front of us today. They have changed but have we, as educators? Have our lessons and lab experiences changed with them? This presentation will show how to adapt and adjust old lab experiences (biology, chemistry, environmental science, and physics) to meet the NGSS standards and why newer phenomena-based lessons differ from old recipe labs. If time permits, teachers will work on a lab they want to update.

TAKEAWAYS:
The main takeaway from this presentation will be how we incorporate rubrics, critical thinking questions, and phenomena into our lab experiences to meet the students & standards of today—cultivating an engaging and collaborative experience for the students.

SPEAKERS:
Dennis Dagounis (Berkeley Heights Public Schools: Berkeley Heights, NJ)

Session Name: Solids: Neglected State of Chemistry

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Colonial Ballroom



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Brassing a Penny Student Instructions
Presentation Slideshow
Test Tube Geology Lab Student Directions

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

various demonstrations will be used to continue to compare and contrast types of solids (materials) and their bonding and properties. For example, (through video) a ceramic alumina rod and metal aluminum rod will be heated to showcase differences in melting point, conductivity, and density. Teachers will also participate in an activity that precipitates copper crystals from copper sulfate. This particular activity mimics how native metals can crystallize in the earth crust naturally. In addition, teachers will participate in a lab that shows how metal atoms can easily be mixed to make an alloy. The concept of solid state diffusion will be discussed.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how to teach basic chemistry concepts using common everyday materials like metals, ceramics, glass, and polymers. Hands-on STEM activities, demonstrations, and labs will make learning these chemistry concepts more engaging and relevant.

SPEAKERS:
Gissel McDonald (Spring Hill High School: Spring Hill, KS), Sarah Ortiz (Teacher: Springfield, NE)

Increasing Student Discourse While Prospecting for Mineral Ore

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2501 D


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: Lab-Aids

How do we engage students to ask questions and develop evidence-based explanations? In this hands-on activity from the Lab-Aids EDC Earth Science program, discourse occurs authentically as you role-play a geologist testing various site extractions for molybdenum, a valuable mineral.

Avogadro’s Law and Order: Investigating a Rocket Launch Failure

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2503 A


Show Details

Sponsoring Company: Vernier Science Education

While building bottle rockets, students are instructed not to use more than 10 pumps on a bicycle pump. When a bottle bursts and injures students, it's up to you to investigate. Use Avogadro’s law and a Go Direct® Gas Pressure Sensor to solve the mystery in this hands-on experiment.

SPEAKERS:
Nüsret Hisim (Vernier Science Education: Beaverton, OR)

Game On! Game-Based Learning vs. Gamification

Saturday, October 28 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 1501 A


STRAND: Tech Tools

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: Plasma Games

It's all fun and games but does it work? Dive into the difference between gamification and game-based learning to innovate your classroom, and engage and excite students to learn Chemistry. Bonus: Leave with an all-inclusive access code to a 3-D game-based platform.

SPEAKERS:
Alison Baker (Lead Curriculum Specialist: Raleigh, NC)

The Vitamin C Workshop: Quantitative Analysis of Vitamin C in Juice and Vitamins - The Perfect Integration of Chemistry and Mathematics

Saturday, October 28 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2201



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
0-Workshop NSTA VitC Titration Handout GraphPaper.pdf
0-Workshop NSTA VitC Titration Handout Instructions.pdf
1-NSTA Vit C Titration Handout.pdf
2-NSTA Vit C Clock Handout.pdf
3-NSTA Red Cabbage Handout.pdf
4-NSTA Foot to Hand.pdf
5-NSTA Milk Lab Handout.pdf
NSTA Pic.jpg

STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Adventures in Laboratory Science is a theme-based physical science course for non-science majors designed to expose students to the basic principles of chemistry and mathematics using common household substances. In addition to "non-science" college students, this workshop is appropriate for teachers of students in the 3rd through 12th grades. Attendees will work in groups of 4 to complete two experiments: the titration of vitamin C with iodine and the iodine clock reaction. The experiments will include the titration of standard vitamin C solutions to produce a linear curve which will be used to calculate the vitamin C content in juice samples. After collecting all data, participants will analyze and interpret the results using Excel and basic algebraic principles. The goal is to have participants do the Vitamin C project with their students and then enter the data into a shared file to create a national collaborative publishable work between the presenter and the attendees.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn how to integrate math into the vitamin C project and customize the project to meet the academic standards of your students and to join a collaborative research project for students in 3rd through 12th grade.

SPEAKERS:
Sharron Jenkins (Georgia Gwinnett College: Lawrenceville, GA)

Utilizing Water Quality as an Over-Arching Research Project in General Chemistry I

Saturday, October 28 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2205



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Link to presentation slides and resources

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Water quality is everyone’s concern; we all need water to live healthy lives. Between Flint, MI, and Jackson, MS, it’s important that citizens know how to assess their water quality from chemical and societal perspectives. This project introduces students to water quality, how our water is cleaned for drinking purposes, and how socio-economic influences impact water quality in the US. Students apply general chemistry I concepts to the water quality to understand how the Flint and Jackson Water Crises occurred, experimentally assess a water sample from their home, compare their results it to their local water quality report, draw conclusions based on their findings, and explore if what happened in Flint and Jackson could happen to them. Students conduct literature research as a part of this project and complete a final report on their findings and conclusions.

TAKEAWAYS:
Water quality is everyone's concern. This presentation will show educators how to equip students to apply their chemical knowledge to assess water quality and advocate for themselves and others.

SPEAKERS:
Catherine Haslag (Riverland Community College)

Game On! Game-Based Learning vs. Gamification

Saturday, October 28 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 1501 A


STRAND: Tech Tools

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: Plasma Games

It's all fun and games but does it work? Dive into the difference between gamification and game-based learning to innovate your classroom, and engage and excite students to learn Chemistry. Bonus: Leave with an all-inclusive access code to a 3-D game-based platform.

A Natural Approach to Chemistry: One in a Million

Saturday, October 28 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2501 D


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: Lab-Aids

How do we teach topics such as electron configurations so that high school students can learn and understand them? Walk away with some effective ways to teach the structure of the atom. Using a user-friendly spectrophotometer, explore how light interacts with dyes. Then use unique spectrum cards to show how atoms, color, and spectra are related, making a conceptual bridge between a core chemical technology—making dyes—and the fundamental structure of the atom.

Evidence-Based Teaching in Chemistry

Saturday, October 28 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2208


Show Details

Research has proved that active learning is more effective than traditional lectures. However, active learning requires additional support in addition to the textbooks. For example, POGIL needs workbooks to assist students' learning. Flipped classroom needs clickers to collect students' responses. This talk will discuss what kind of support is required by active learning, specifically for flipped classroom and Just-in-time learning from a practice standpoint and a technology standpoint. After the presentation, the attendees will be able to design their own material for their classroom teaching. After the presentation, the attendees will have skills to design their own material for their classroom teaching. For example, the attendee can prepare teaching material before class, during class, and after class for flipped classroom and Just-in-time learning. The attendees will also learn how to choose technologies to assist their implementation of their chosen teaching pedagogy.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn a new tool to improve the teaching/learning efficiency of the classroom teacher AND reduce the workload of the teacher.

SPEAKERS:
Jack Huang (associate professor: Jacksonville, FL)

STEAM-Powered Stoichiometry: Where Art and Chemistry Converge

Saturday, October 28 • 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Share-a-thon Area


Show Details

Stoichiometry is a topic in foundational chemistry that is often difficult for students to grasp. In this lesson, students learn about stoichiometry from the perspective of making paint. The lesson plan brings together many chemistry topics that are often taught in siloed chapters: types of chemical reactions, balanced chemical equations, net ionic equations, limiting reactants, molarity, and solution stoichiometry. This lesson brings these topics together and students make sense of how the different topics are conceptually bound. The art component of painting a personal tile gives each student the opportunity for self-expression and the inclusion of each tile into a class quilt makes for a unique perspective of the collective.

TAKEAWAYS:
Student engagement in learning and understanding a difficult concept like stoichiometry is buoyed by inclusion of an art component and a descriptive narrative that allows for open expression of a student's interests or culture.

SPEAKERS:
Caroline Gochoco-Tsuyuki (Archbishop Riordan High School: San Francisco, CA)

In-Class or Home School Integrated Math & Science Chemistry Research Projects

Saturday, October 28 • 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Share-a-thon Area



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
0-Workshop NSTA VitC Titration Handout GraphPaper.pdf
Workshop Vitamin C Lab - Graph Paper
0-Workshop NSTA VitC Titration Handout Instructions.pdf
1-NSTA Vit C Titration Handout.pdf
2-NSTA Vit C Clock Handout.pdf
Vitamin C Lab
3-NSTA Red Cabbage Handout.pdf
4-NSTA Foot to Hand.pdf
5-NSTA Milk Lab Handout.pdf

Show Details

This presentation revolves around the development of two distinctive research projects: Vitamin C Project and the Carbon Dioxide Project. In the Vitamin C project, participants extract juice from fruits and determine the vitamin C content using common household chemicals. In the Carbon Dioxide Project, participants quantitatively determine the amount of carbon dioxide and water produced when mixing specified amounts of baking soda and vinegar. The capture of carbon dioxide and water in clear balloons is an engaging way to apply basic mathematics to a chemical reaction. Embracing an integrative approach to teaching science and mathematics helps bridge the gap between knowledge learned and knowledge applied. This presentation will provide educators with innovative, standards-aligned projects that foster student interest in science and mathematics. For 3rd - 6th graders, these research projects can be delivered through storybooks!

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will gain full activity descriptions and handouts for at least three projects and learn how to integrate math skills into research projects that promote critical thinking and discovery (targeting 3rd - 12th grade).

SPEAKERS:
Sharron Jenkins (Georgia Gwinnett College: Lawrenceville, GA)

Online Preliminary Course Could Increase Engagement and Retention for Incoming General Biology and Anatomy Undergraduate Students

Saturday, October 28 • 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Share-a-thon Area


Show Details

Throughout teaching Anatomy and Physiology (A&P) and General Biology, students often face academic challenges surrounding these two foundational courses. One intended method to overcome these challenges is to implement a preliminary online course that students can complete before starting the academic year. Attendees will discuss how to design their own preliminary online course through an interactive workshop (in electronic and hard-copy formats) with group-based activities (e.g., discussions and demos) for any college-level biology course. We will also demonstrate various methods and assessments (e.g., recorded videos, quizzes, virtual escape rooms) best suited for students who choose to take the prep course, through our findings at our current college. A sample of our current preliminary online courses can be found via this link: https://sites.google.com/springfieldcollege.edu/bioprepcoursessc/general-biology-online-course

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn about our experience using a preliminary online course for undergraduates. Attendees will then learn how to design their own prep courses focusing on what students require in general biology and anatomy.

SPEAKERS:
Gemma Bartha (Instructor: Springfield, MA)

Hands-On Titrations Anywhere: Teaching Inquiry and Scientific Practices with Paper Microfluidics

Saturday, October 28 • 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Share-a-thon Area


Show Details

Hands-on lab experiments are crucial for students to develop proficiency with the science and engineering practices in the Next Generation Science Standards, but traditional labs often require hazardous materials, expensive equipment, long lab times, and dedicated facilities, leaving them out of reach for many schools. Paper microfluidics provides a safe, low-cost, and easy-to-use platform to do hands-on chemistry experiments without specialized equipment or lab spaces. MICRO Project experiments use paper microfluidics to teach inquiry-based chemistry labs. Each MICRO lab is designed to engage students in science and engineering practices and includes instructor notes, customizable pre- and post-lab questions, student procedures, and background on a relevant issue of equity and justice. These labs have been used by thousands of students at universities, community colleges, and middle and high schools. Participants at the Share-a-Thon will perform a MICRO titration lab.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how to integrate authentic scientific practices into safe, hands-on, low-cost lab experiments.

SPEAKERS:
Rachel Roller (PhD Candidate: Mishawaka, IN)

Cutting Through the Chemistry of CRISPR Cas-9.

Saturday, October 28 • 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Share-a-thon Area


Show Details

The unique nature of this presentation leverages the extensive knowledge and experience of both a chemistry and a biology educator (who is also a research scientist) to show how teachers can use biotechnologies, such as DNA Fingerprinting and CRISPR Cas-9, to motivate student exploration while expanding their chemistry knowledge and inspiring them to pursue research. This topic is particularly important because CRISPR Cas-9 is at the forefront of medical breakthroughs such as CAR-T cell cancer treatments and gene therapy. Unfortunately, this topic has not yet been used to its full potential in the classroom. This presentation will raise awareness among teachers of how to explain and utilize biotechnologies in various ways. Specifically, this session will show how to use chemistry to explain CRISPR Cas-9 while emphasizing the six elements of life, functional groups, and macromolecules (using hands-on molecular models) to leverage sense making to explain these complex processes.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how to excite students to learn and apply the chemistry necessary to understand the latest breakthroughs in biotechnology such as DNA Fingerprinting and CRISPR Cas-9. This presentation will showcase the crosscutting concept of systems and system models.

SPEAKERS:
Susan Allison (Dawson Education Service Cooperative: Arkadelphia, AR), Patrycja Krakowiak (Biology Instructor: Hot Springs, AR)

Google Sites for the Advanced Science Lab

Saturday, October 28 • 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Share-a-thon Area



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Resources for Building Your Google Site

Show Details

Attendees will walk through the process of creating a Google Site specific to their classroom. They will learn how to create a master template to share with their students and how to help their students get started with the Google Site. They will also learn how to support their students as the Google Site is used to submit projects, portfolios, or lab notebooks. Attendees will learn how to insert pictures, files, and videos into the Google Site to create a more interactive resource for students. Attendees will begin to create their own template in the session with the goal of having a template ready to use in their classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
Google Sites streamlines the grading process for lab notebooks and projects.

SPEAKERS:
Brodie Solomon (Physics Teacher: Ft Worth, TX), Katie Labadie (Science Department Chair: Fort Worth, TX)

Physically Active Modeling For Comparing States of Matter

Saturday, October 28 • 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Share-a-thon Area



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Ideal Gas Law Students as Particles Activity Handout.docx
Physically Active Modeling Ideal Gas Laws Lesson Plan.docx
Physically Active Modeling States of Matter (1).pptx
Physically Active Modeling States of Matter Blank Handout NSTA 2023 .docx
Physically Active Modeling States of Matter Slides Handout NSTA 2023 KC.docx
QR Code Physically Active Modeling For States Of Matter NSTA 2023.png

Show Details

This activity has students/participants act as particles. To start, participants are given baseline information about how attractive forces between particles can vary from very strong to negligible, & that particles are always in motion. To model very strong forces participants link arms at the elbow, for moderately strong forces they hold hands, & for weak/negligible forces they can only hold each other’s pinky fingers. Participants start far apart & move very slowly to model a very cold temperature. At this speed, all of the participants are able to form an organized structure (solid). With each iteration the participants move faster. This results in the weak force group not being able to form structure (gas), the moderate force group being clumped together but not organized (liquid), & the strong force group still being able to form an organized structure (solid). Activity will then be modified to explain WHY gas law variables have the relationships they do (P,V,T, n).

TAKEAWAYS:
Students will not only know the properties of solids, liquids, and gasses, but will also be able to give in-depth explanations as to WHY the properties are different by behaving as the particles at different temperatures and with different attractive forces.

SPEAKERS:
Clark Ellis (The Kinkaid School)

Metals: Digging Beneath the Surface

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2206



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Slideshow + Resources

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

In this workshop, participants will learn about the science behind metal properties through hands-on activities. They will create a simple low-melt alloy and generate a binary phase diagram. That phase diagram will be analyzed and lead to a discussion of melting points of alloys. Participants will explore the effects of heat and working on metal properties, and discover how to manipulate steel properties through annealing, quenching, and tempering. The steel samples include a high carbon and low carbon steel: bobby pin and paper clip. Participants will also compare the properties of copper wire to those of steel samples, gaining a deeper understanding of different metal behaviors."

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will explore how students can change metal properties through alloying, heat-treating, and cold-working. Classroom activities enhance understanding of both atomic structure of metals and real world engineering relevance.

SPEAKERS:
Sarah Ortiz (Teacher: Springfield, NE), Gissel McDonald (Spring Hill High School: Spring Hill, KS)

Copper: Two Inquiries to Begin and End the School Year

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 G


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Copper is used in plumbing, coinage, and electrical wiring; yet we often take this element for granted. Copper has been known since at least 9000 BC, but many of its reactions and properties have only been determined in recent centuries. This inquiry requires students to: research the chemical reactions of copper (redox, double displacement, and decomposition), apply prior knowledge of stoichiometry and conservation of matter, analyze a copper solution using spectroscopy, and use proper laboratory techniques and skills. NGSS standards HS PS1-2, HS PS1-5, and HS PS1-7 will be addressed. Participants will: research and design an Inquiry experiment, use technology to collect/analyze data, & visualize what occurs on the submicroscopic level by employing particulate drawings. Join this workshop to take home a two-unit inquiry lab which is a perfect beginning-of-year lab and end-of-course lab practical. There will be time allotted for participant questions. Handouts will be provided.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will take part in a “hands-on” Inquiry experiment, use technology to collect/analyze data, and visualize what occurs on the submicroscopic level in copper chemical reactions by employing particulate drawings.

SPEAKERS:
Gregory Dodd (Retired Chemistry Teacher: Pennsboro, WV)

Food Science Literacy- A Real World Application in the Classroom

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 1501 C


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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This is an overview of the farm-to-table process through the FDA. Labs are written so that the level of literacy is equitable to the grade span for which it is written. Grade levels 5-12 are included in the curriculum and NGSS standards included. The curriculum spans biology, chemistry, physical science, environmental science, and food and consumer science. It is written free of bias so that all students regardless of their life experiences can relate science to everyday food safety and nutrition. Food safety and nutrition will be discussed, curriculum links, methods, and activities to bring real-world knowledge into the classroom will be shared. Ideas for incorporating lessons as well as the literacy standards linking reading nonfiction topics in the science classroom will be addressed. Three classroom activities using beef, milk and salt will be demonstrated to show connections with science literacy standards.

TAKEAWAYS:
Students will: 1. be introduced to the fundamentals of microbiology while, at the same time, identifying important public health information through literature and hands-on learning activities; 2. learn about the label, and that nutrition not only aids in general well-being.

SPEAKERS:
Leanne Thele (Perryville High School: , MO), Tiska Rodgers (Clarkton High School: Clarkton, MO)

Hands-on Titrations Anywhere: Teaching Inquiry and Scientific Practices with Paper Microfluidics

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2502 B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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Hands-on lab experiments are crucial for students to develop proficiency with the science and engineering practices in the Next Generation Science Standards, but traditional labs often require hazardous materials, expensive equipment, long lab times, and dedicated facilities, leaving them out of reach for many schools. Paper microfluidics provides a safe, low-cost, and easy-to-use platform to do hands-on chemistry experiments without specialized equipment or lab spaces. MICRO Project experiments use paper microfluidics to teach inquiry-based chemistry labs. Each MICRO lab is designed to engage students in science and engineering practices and includes instructor notes, customizable pre- and post-lab questions, student procedures, and background on a relevant issue of equity and justice. These labs have been used by thousands of students at universities, community colleges, and middle and high schools. Workshop attendees will perform a MICRO titration lab.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how to integrate authentic scientific practices into safe, hands-on, low-cost lab experiments.

SPEAKERS:
Rachel Roller (PhD Candidate: Mishawaka, IN)

Energizing Sensemaking with LOL Energy Models

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 1501 B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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The presentation will include background information detailing how the presenters traditionally taught energy concepts in their physical science, chemistry, and physics classrooms and then gained familiarity with LOL diagrams and implemented this tool in their own classrooms. The presenters will outline why a shift in the instructional approach was needed and how use of this tool can help students to better understand the abstract concept of energy outlined in the evidence statements for NGSS HS-PS3. We will explore how LOL diagrams enhance students’ sensemaking regarding energy, create models of energy flows in systems, and translate conceptual models into computational ones. This approach allows greater integration of the NGSS’s three dimensions as students and participants work to explicitly define systems, leading to greater transparency in students’ thought processes. Participants will engage in discussion with other examples and then work to apply these concepts to their own work.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how student sensemaking can be supported using LOL diagrams to provide a scaffold for creating a conceptual and computational model of energy flow in a system and collaborate in applying these concepts to their own disciplines.

SPEAKERS:
Sarah Evans (Olathe South High School: Olathe, KS), Matt Richard (Teacher: Olathe, KS)

Engaging Students in Healthy Choices- Nutrition and Dietary Supplements

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 F


STRAND: STEM Haven

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How do you teach students to make healthy food choices? Learn some simple hands-on activities that teach students how to understand the Nutrition Facts label to help them to make better choices when eating at home and when dining out. Content is based on the free FDA curriculum: Science and Our Food Supply: Using the Nutrition Facts Label to Make Healthy Food Choices Teachers will leave with the tools to help them teach nutrition activities, as well as learn about the newest FDA curriculum, Science and Our Food Supply: Examining Dietary Supplements. Learn how dietary supplements are defined and regulated so you can arm students with the knowledge to avoid dangers and make wise choices. Participants will engage in activities about the physiological effects of caffeine on the body. We will also look at resources to teach students about supplements banned by athletic organizations. Presenters will share with participants exciting opportunities for free professional development.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn about fun hands-on labs and activities to engage students in the science of nutrition and dietary supplements, how to use free FDA resources to teach about healthy food choices, and how to engage students in activities about the psychological effects of caffeine on the body.

SPEAKERS:
Susan Hartley (Hinkley High School: Aurora, CO)

A Natural Approach to Chemistry: Chemical Formulas and Amino Acids

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2501 D


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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Sponsoring Company: Lab-Aids

What is the difference between subscripts and coefficients? What does "balancing" a chemical equation mean? Many students have trouble with these fundamental concepts in chemistry. If a student does not fully understand the chemical formula, then moles, reactions, and stoichiometry are hopelessly confusing. Join us for some elegant, intuitive, and well-differentiated lessons that allow students of all levels to master the chemical formula and thereby move confidently into a deeper understanding of chemistry.

Nourish the Future: Energy and Biofuels

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 1501 C


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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Students utilize different components (enzymes, yeast, feed stocks, water] to produce ethanol and carbon dioxide through fermentation. Students develop a model and explain how ethanol is made to answer the focus question: "How can fermentation produce a renewable fuel source?" Students develop experimental models to generate data to construct explanations about relationships between components of the fermentation process and to predict how they can be manipulated to produce carbon dioxide. Students will design solutions to make the fermentation process as efficient as possible and generate the maximum amount of ethanol in a small bag environment. Participants will deconstruct a model of starch to examine enzyme and starch reactions to determine how starches change into smaller molecules. Attendees will participate in numerous hands-on activities centered around biofuel.

TAKEAWAYS:
Nourish the Future is a national education initiative developed by science teachers for science teachers to connect students to modern agriculture and provide sound science-based resources that meet teacher and student needs in the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Leanne Thele (Perryville High School: , MO), Tiska Rodgers (Clarkton High School: Clarkton, MO)

Google Sites for the Advanced Science Lab

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2102 A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Resources for Building Your Google Site

STRAND: Tech Tools

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Attendees will walk through the process of creating a Google Site specific to their classroom. They will learn how to create a master template to share with their students and how to help their students get started with the Google Site. They will also learn how to support their students as the Google Site is used to submit projects, portfolios, or lab notebooks. Attendees will learn how to insert pictures, files, and videos into the Google Site to create a more interactive resource for students. Attendees will begin to create their own template in the session with the goal of having a template ready to use in their classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
Google Sites streamlines the grading process for lab notebooks and projects.

SPEAKERS:
Brodie Solomon (Physics Teacher: Ft Worth, TX), Katie Labadie (Science Department Chair: Fort Worth, TX)

Charting the Course with uBEATS (a FREE Interactive STEM Resource)

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2503 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
uBEATS Module Sample Lesson Plans
uBEATS PowerPoint Presentation

STRAND: Tech Tools

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Content for our presentation includes: Opening-Introduction, History and Background of uBEATS, Highlights of the Program, Standards Alignment to NGSS and NCHSE, and a Canvas course walk-through Activity-In this activity portion, we will be taking a “Deep Dive” into uBEATS. We will preview a selected sample Freshman biology unit (Cellular Biology) and show specific modules that could be integrated into that unit of study (Cellular Structure and Function, Mitosis, and Cancer). The modules used in this preview will provide two different interactive activities that we will complete together while viewing them in the module. These modules will provide a review of core content, provide an extension to the core content, and bring in a career connection (Careers in Medical Imaging and Therapeutic Sciences). Closing-Register, Module Preview, social media, Podcast

TAKEAWAYS:
In this session, attendees will walk away with a clear understanding of what uBEATS is, how to effectively use this resource, and be fully prepared for implementation in their classrooms.

SPEAKERS:
Zuzi Greiner (Instructional Technologist)

Redox: The Applications of Corrosion Chemistry

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2502 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Slideshow + Resources

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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This presentation will cover the simple principles of redox reactions and corrosion chemistry. Attendees will learn about the transfer of electrons between species, how to write equations for oxidation and reduction, and the factors that affect the rate of corrosion. The presentation will also explore the properties of metals such as zinc and aluminum and their usefulness in various applications. Practical applications of redox reactions and corrosion chemistry will be discussed, including galvanization and reduction of metal ores. Hands-on activities and audience participation will be encouraged throughout the presentation. By the end, attendees will have a solid understanding of the chemistry behind redox reactions and corrosion and how this knowledge can be applied in real-world situations.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn hands-on labs, activities, and demos that can be used to teach about corrosion. A look at corrosion will lead to a discussion of how to teach redox principles in a simple way in the classroom. Examples of redox in action in the real world will make this relevant to students.

SPEAKERS:
Sarah Ortiz (Teacher: Springfield, NE), Gissel McDonald (Spring Hill High School: Spring Hill, KS)

Bridging Redox to ALL learners: Making Sense of Voltaic Cells with ELL in Mind

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 G



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA KC Bridging REDOX to ALL Learners with ELL in Mind

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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The impact of battery operated cars have become a hot topic as energy alternatives are explored. Unfortunately, few students get exposed to the true nature of a Voltaic Cell and the vital workings of the transfer of chemical energy to electrical energy through oxidation-reduction reactions. After a junior high demo, Physical Science and Chemistry classes don't relate the function of metals in their tug-of-war with electrons within a Redox reaction. Working with an ELL Specialist, Science Specialists created a series of lessons that incorporate phenomenon, asking questions, creating an investigation, data analysis, justification of their data through science research and application to real world analogous phenomenon. These have been tried in Arkansas Physical Science and Chemistry classrooms. To improve the efficiency and effectiveness of batteries, the next generation must engage on the issue. The answers may come from the next William Kamkwamba not the AP Chem class.

TAKEAWAYS:
When life gives you lemons- make a battery! Educators will see an inclusive approach incorporating a demo to explore how a battery operates. It will relate the simple to the complex Redox reaction with supports and scaffolded instruction to best meet the needs of all learners.

SPEAKERS:
Susan Allison (Dawson Education Service Cooperative: Arkadelphia, AR)

Chemistry Lessons in the Science Practices Innovation Notebook (SPIN)

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2503 A


STRAND: Tech Tools

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SPIN has 3 customizable lessons for data-focused investigations in Chemistry on Periodic Trends, Thermodynamics, and Stoichiometry. Teachers can also input their own lessons into SPIN. One of the teachers who created the lessons in the notebook will be presenting. The first 30 minutes presenters will give teachers accounts in SPIN and show how students can use the notebook and the metacognitive support features such as the Communication Hub, I’m Stuck button, and SPAARC prompts. Experiences of teachers and students who have used SPIN will be discussed. In the final 30 minutes, teachers will customize a lesson in SPIN or input their own lessons with help from the presenters. By the end of the session, teachers will be able to use SPIN effectively with the ability to share the notebook with all of the teachers at their school. Use of SPIN is entirely free and is found at https://spin.cehd.gmu.edu/login. There are also lessons available in biology, Earth science, and physics.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will learn how to use SPIN to download and edit a lesson from the Global Marketplace or create their own lesson in SPIN. Teachers who have used SPIN note that this has helped their students understand data practices explicitly.

SPEAKERS:
Zachary Minchow-Proffitt (Teacher: Leesburg, VA), Erin Peters-Burton (George Mason University: Fairfax, VA)

STEAM-Powered Stoichiometry: Where Art and Chemistry Converge

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2502 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA 2023 STEAM STOICHIOMETRY PROJECT.docx
Unit worksheet for STEAM Stoichiometry Project
NSTA 2023 STEAM WORKSHOP PPT.pptx
STEAM Stoichiometry Workshop Powerpoint File
STEaM Stoichiometry Image

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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Stoichiometry is a topic that many teacher find difficult to teach and for many students, difficult to learn. In this project-based workshop, students will learn stoichiometry principles from the perspective of making paint. Paints are made up of three components: a pigment, a binder, and a thinner. In the water-based paint created in this module, the binder is calcium carbonate, an insoluble precipitate made from the double-displacement reaction between aqueous solutions of calcium chloride and sodium carbonate. When mixed in stoichiometric amounts, an insoluble precipitate, calcium carbonate, forms. Students use stoichiometry to quantify the correct amounts of aqueous reactants to make a desired amount of binder, then mix their own paint using pigment and water as a thinner. The project culminates in a class quilt made up of students' individually painted tiles.

TAKEAWAYS:
Stoichiometry does not have to be an anxiety-producing, tear-jerking unit. When taught in chewable chunks, students gain an appreciation for its importance in daily life. In this workshop, students learn concepts that are tied to an end-product art project.

SPEAKERS:
Caroline Gochoco-Tsuyuki (Archbishop Riordan High School: San Francisco, CA)

DCI, CCC, and SEP's Oh My! Sweet and Salty Investigations with a 3-D twist!

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 G