2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

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Rooms and times subject to change.
9 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Genes in Space: A Free Experimental Design Competition

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2504 B


STRAND: Research to Practice

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Sponsoring Company: miniPCR bio

Engage students in authentic research through Genes in Space: the experimental design competition that launches experiments to the International Space Station. Learn about free educational resources, including lesson plans, classroom activities, explainer videos, and biotechnology equipment loans.

SPEAKERS:
Marc Bliss (miniPCR bio: Cambridge, MA)

Making Meaningful Connections to Social Emotional Learning Alongside the NGSS

Friday, October 27 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2201


STRAND: Research to Practice

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Since the NGSS, science teachers have been increasingly considering how to effectively engage students during science lessons using science and engineering practices (SEPs). In order to engage in these practices deeply, students need to have effective social and emotional skills. Therefore, embedding social-emotional learning (SEL) can be a tool that teachers use to build a classroom community that deeply engages in the SEPs. This session will engage students in three science activities (one elementary, one middle school, and one high school) that promote 3D learning and SEL. For example, the high school activity will consist of us doing a simulation where participants will act as animals getting "food". We will use it to connect SEL to HS-LS2-8. We will then have participants reflect on SEL teaching strategies such as explicit/reflective SEL questions (Bahnson et al., 2020) in order to demonstrate how to meaningfully embed SEL into 3D NGSS lessons.

TAKEAWAYS:
You will learn strategies to teach SEL in existing NGSS lessons.

SPEAKERS:
Kathryn Borton (Science Teacher: Nevada, IA), Jesse Wilcox (University of Northern Iowa: Cedar Falls, IA)

Using Photovoice to Promote Undergraduate Students' Socioscientific Reasoning Skills

Friday, October 27 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2214


STRAND: Research to Practice

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Socioscientific issues are complex, open-ended social issues with embedded scientific content and processes. This presentation aims to foster undergraduate students' reasoning skills necessary to navigate these issues. Specifically, a photovoice activity was added to a water quality unit in a scientific inquiry course. First, during the data collection, students were asked to take photos that could best represent the status of the ecological system of the stream. Second, they worked as groups in the classroom to analyze the different pieces of evidence and create a visual representation where they can organize all the evidence in the photos. Lastly, each group presented their photovoice product to the whole class and explained each piece of their evidence and how they indicate the different aspects of water quality and the overall water quality. The activity will be presented and supporting instructional materials and tools will be provided in this presentation.

TAKEAWAYS:
This presentation will show how to promote students' reasoning skills necessary to negotiate with socioscientific issues through a photovoice activity, and provide supporting instructional materials and tools.

SPEAKERS:
Conghui Liu (Ph.D. Candidate: Bloomington, MO)

Travelling back in time through Earth’s history with scientific ocean drilling

Friday, October 27 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2201



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
scientific-ocean-drilling-NSTA2023-KC.pdf

STRAND: Research to Practice

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How do we know about mass-extinctions and meteor impacts? Using fossils to study past glacial periods? Shells, sand grains and even dust and volcanic ash from faraway lands fall slowly through the ocean and pile up on the seafloor, eventually becoming rocks. When we drill into the seafloor to collect layers of rocks (as cores), the deeper down we go, the further back in time we go. Scientists looking at these cores are effectively reading the pages in a book that reveals the Earth’s past, and sheds light on our future. This workshop will have teachers look at how using real scientific data collected onboard the JOIDES Resolution and other ships in the program, we can translate findings into data sets and activities to inspire students and help them see science in action. The focus will be on how data from oceanic drilling can be used to create activities using real-world phenomena that can connect to many scientific concepts, such as climate, natural hazards, and Earth’s systems.

TAKEAWAYS:
By looking into the past and present, we can begin to predict our future. The International Ocean Discovery Program creates educational resources that enable students to use real data collected by scientists investigating global concerns and explore parts of our world usually hidden to them.

SPEAKERS:
Maya Pincus (Columbia University / U.S. Science Support Program: Palisades, NY), Carol Cotterill (U.S. Science Support Program: Palisades, NY)

Does coherence perspective matter? Examining a comparison of 5E and storylines curricula on students’ academic achievement and attitudes toward science.

Friday, October 27 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Dissertation Defense Presentation.pdf
Copy of presentation - you can search for the full dissertation on ProQuest.

STRAND: Research to Practice

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Educators have struggled with maintaining student engagement in science, especially as students transition from primary to middle school and upper grades (Vedder-Weiss & Fortus, 2012). With the adoption of the Next Generation Science Standards, teachers are looking for curricula to support its implementation. Two curricula, mySci 5E and OpenSciEd storylines, were compared in terms of student academic achievement and attitudes toward science. The research questions were: (1) To what extent is there a difference between achievement in science by eighth grade students experiencing the OpenSciEd storyline science curriculum and those experiencing MySci 5E as measured by end of unit assessment scores? (2) To what extent is the difference between attitudes towards science by eighth grade students experiencing the OpenSciEd storyline science curriculum and those experiencing MySci 5E as measured by My Attitudes Toward Science (MATS) surveys (Hillman et al., 2016)?

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will hear about the results of the study and potential impacts of the perception of coherence on students’ academic achievements and attitudes toward science. Implications for future research will be discussed.

SPEAKERS:
Nina Blanton (Educator: , MO), Nicole Vick (Northwestern University)

Using 'Genius Hour' in the High School Astronomy Classroom

Friday, October 27 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


STRAND: Research to Practice

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This poster discusses the mutli-year implementation of a ‘Genius Hour’ project in a high school stellar astronomy course. Through multiple semester iterations of the project, the classroom teacher has refined the process to make it accessible to students of a variety of ages, learning styles, and abilities. The key take-away from this poster is that with appropriate scaffolds, ANY student can find success with this type of project, regardless of prior knowledge or success in the science classroom. This process, implemented over ten 40-minute periods in the classroom, is 100% student-driven, and allows students to pursue sensemaking and learning of a topic of their choosing as it relates to astronomy. From driving question development to public display, this poster discusses how to guide and motivate students, as well as how to grade the components and final result. In addition to multiple work samples and student achievement data, a framework for implementation will be shared.

TAKEAWAYS:
Key Point: YOU can do this in YOUR classroom! Learn the steps taken to implement Genius Hour successfully in the HS astronomy classroom, including the framework used, ideas for differentiation, and a variety of student work samples.

SPEAKERS:
Katie Mercadante (Montour School District: , PA)

Worthwhile Words: Implementing Effective Vocabulary Instruction

Friday, October 27 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


STRAND: Research to Practice

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A middle school PLC observed that students were not retaining or using content specific vocabulary or completing teacher provided practice. Through a coaching partnership, educators researched and determined to prioritize the following learning: conceptual understanding, explicit instruction, connection between words, multiple interactions with words, and discourse among peers. First, teachers minimized the words in each unit to focus only on Tier 3 and Tier 2 words. Next, the educators placed the words in a flow chart on a large wall showing connections between words. Teachers developed conceptual understanding during instruction and ways for students to interact with each word. Examples included; labs, readings, definitions, and discourse with peers. The teachers intentionally selected strategies to interact with each word such as defining, drawing, comparing, summarizing, discussing, and synthesizing their understanding. Student work was displayed on the interactive wall.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will leave with strategies to implement vocabulary instruction in any science content area.

SPEAKERS:
Maryam Siddiqui (Teacher: , IL), Meghan Chuipek (Thompson Middle School)

Internationalizing Instruction on Climate Change: Examine the New Approach to Address Students’ Misconceptions and Develop Reasoning Skills

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2214


STRAND: Research to Practice

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This work is based on the result of a design-based research on internationalizing climate change instruction. During the instruction, the instructor introduced the content knowledge on climate change through a lab activity. Next, the students visited six stations to understand the impact of climate change on different areas of the world. They were also asked to identify the patterns and trends associated with various global maps demonstrating global climate change's differential impacts and complete a provided worksheet based on this gallery-walk activity. After the gallery-walk activity, students were asked to respond through a scientific report to the claim, “Climate change is the great equalizer and equally affects everyone in the world.” The students constructed a scientific explanation either in support of or against the provided claim. The workshop participants will experience the activity and discuss how to adopt it in their classrooms.

TAKEAWAYS:
How to internationalize climate change instruction for global competence.

SPEAKERS:
Shukufe Rahman (Graduate Student: Bloomington, IN), Conghui Liu (Ph.D. Candidate: Bloomington, MO)

Helping Students Understand Changing Climates and Their Potential Socioeconomic Impacts

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 1501 A


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Changing global and local climates have perceptible impacts on communities, so teachers need to be able to develop lessons based on reliable date and research-based reports that their students can access and analyze to inform future decision-making. In this session, I will share some examples of use.

TAKEAWAYS:
Available climate data exists to be used in developing lesson plans to guide student decision-making.

SPEAKERS:
Michael Passow (Dwight Morrow HS (retd): Englewood, NJ)

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