2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

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FILTERS APPLIED:6 - 8, Presentation, Research to Practice, Earth

 

Rooms and times subject to change.
6 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Using Midwest-Centered Phenomena to Anchor Storylines About Climate Science

Friday, October 27 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2210



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Wysession_NSTA_Midwest_Climate_post.pdf
Slides on ideas for teaching about climate science using Midwest-centered storylines.

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Creative ideas will be explored for developing and using climate science storylines based on Midwestern climate phenomena, past and present. For example, the timing of the settling of Midwestern states was a direct result of global and regional climate changes that included the Little Ice Age (creating a demand for animal furs for coats and hats) and the giant 1815 eruption of the Indonesian volcano Tambora (which caused the famines of the “year without a summer” and drove large numbers of easterners westward into the Midwest. Examining regional Midwest geology (such as glacial deposits and bedrock limestone layers) can also foster student sensemaking of the cycles of climate change that can occur on longer time scales. Analyzing the evidence of past climate changes and its impacts on humans and other life will help students carry out the processes of sensemaking to better understand the current trends in climate change (obtained from NASA satellites) and their implications for humans.

TAKEAWAYS:
Climate-related storylines anchored by Midwest regional phenomena provide powerful frameworks for students to develop sensemaking of performance expectations concerning weather and climate. Instructors will leave with multiple ideas for incorporating the latest climate science into their classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Michael Wysession (Washington University in St. Louis: Saint Louis, MO)

Does coherence perspective matter? Examining a comparison of 5E and storylines curricula on students’ academic achievement and attitudes toward science.

Friday, October 27 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Dissertation Defense Presentation.pdf
Copy of presentation - you can search for the full dissertation on ProQuest.

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Educators have struggled with maintaining student engagement in science, especially as students transition from primary to middle school and upper grades (Vedder-Weiss & Fortus, 2012). With the adoption of the Next Generation Science Standards, teachers are looking for curricula to support its implementation. Two curricula, mySci 5E and OpenSciEd storylines, were compared in terms of student academic achievement and attitudes toward science. The research questions were: (1) To what extent is there a difference between achievement in science by eighth grade students experiencing the OpenSciEd storyline science curriculum and those experiencing MySci 5E as measured by end of unit assessment scores? (2) To what extent is the difference between attitudes towards science by eighth grade students experiencing the OpenSciEd storyline science curriculum and those experiencing MySci 5E as measured by My Attitudes Toward Science (MATS) surveys (Hillman et al., 2016)?

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will hear about the results of the study and potential impacts of the perception of coherence on students’ academic achievements and attitudes toward science. Implications for future research will be discussed.

SPEAKERS:
Nina Blanton (Educator: , MO), Nicole Vick (Northwestern University)

Identifying Schoolyard Opportunities for Authentic Science Investigations

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2207



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Schoolyard Resources Folder

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

In this interactive presentation, the presenter will share a schoolyard science template and guide attendees through how to customize the template for their local community. The presenter will share examples and resources to support each component of the schoolyard science template including (a) the use of satellite imagery and schoolyard assessments to identify existing schoolyard resources, (b) connecting 3-D learning standards to place-based schoolyard science opportunities, and (c) opportunities for stewardship and civic engagement. The presenter will share several strategies to engage students with the SEPs in the schoolyard as they observe, measure, monitor, and experiment with their local environment. The schoolyard science template was developed as part of Advancing Science’s NOAA-funded grant to develop an environmental literacy plan in collaboration with Adams County, PA, school districts.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will gain access to a schoolyard science planning template and the knowledge to customize the template for their local community. Attendees will learn to connect schoolyard resources with DCIs and SEPs to help students make sense of their local environment while learning science content.

SPEAKERS:
Valerie Stone (Gettysburg College: Gettysburg, PA)

Equity and Social Justice in Space: Visioning culturally sustaining astronomy education (using an example from OpenSciEd Middle School)

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 H


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

In this workshop we will work through the "anchoring phenomenon" from the OpenSciEd Middle School space unit, which helps students see the relevance of astronomy by drawing on traditional indigenous astronomy knowledge, and students' own cultural knowledge to engage students in identifying and explaining patterns in the sky that set the rhythm for our lives. Participants will get a chance to experience the anchoring phenomenon, and share their own experience, expertise and ideas, to begin visioning how astronomy education can draw on student and community resources, connect students to traditional knowledge from around the world, and build on natural curiosity about questions that are older than Western history.

TAKEAWAYS:
Anchoring astronomy instruction in phenomena that invite connections between science and students' identities can support culturally sustaining pedagogy in the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Zoe Buck Bracey (Senior Science Educator and Director of Design for Justice: Colorado Springs, CO), Thomas Clayton (K-5 STEAM Specialist: Berkeley Heights, NJ), Jamie Noll (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO)

ASTE: Native Earth | Native Sky: Increasing Student Engagement Through Culturally-Relevant Curriculum

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2203


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The primary goal of Native Earth | Native Sky is to build culturally-relevant earth-sky STEM curricula that will increase the understanding of and interest in STEM fields for middle school students in three Oklahoma Native American nations. Providing a culturally-relevant STEM curriculum in a classroom can increase student motivation (Landson-Billings, 1995) for groups historically underrepresented in STEM careers. The theory of Two-Eyed Seeing, which places equal status on western science and Indigenous ways of knowing (Hatcher et al., 2009), and the pedagogical model of place-based learning (Semken, 2005) can be valuable tools for designing learning experiences for Native American students. This session will provide an overview of the program and lessons related to MS-LS2 Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics, MS-ESS2-2 Earth’s Systems, and MS-ESS1-1 Earth's Place in the Universe using three-dimensional teaching and learning.

TAKEAWAYS:
How to increase student engagement by weaving cultural components and place-based learning with science and STEM curriculum.

SPEAKERS:
Sarah McDowell (Butner MS/ HS: Cromwell, OK), Angela Just (GRA)

Solar Eclipse Education for All: Using the Double Eclipse to Help All Students Make Sense of a Rare Phenomenon

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2202



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Solar Eclipse Education for All
Powerpoint and activity documents

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

This presentation will focus on how our STEM education center educated students and the public about the upcoming solar eclipses. Presenters will share how the Center incorporated sensemaking through the phenomenon of solar eclipses by engaging students with the SEPs of modeling and constructing explanations. The outreach will primarily focus on standard MS-ESS1-1, but the goal of the outreach aligns with the goals of the Framework to educate all students in science and engineering and to provide foundational knowledge for our future scientists, engineers, technologists, and technicians. Attendees will engage in an activity that they can share with their classroom in order to safely view the 2024 solar eclipse, including the creation of a solar eclipse viewer. Presenters will also share teaching strategies that make use of modeling and online simulations for eclipses. Time will be included for participants to share their own ideas of effective solar eclipse teaching strategies.

TAKEAWAYS:
Educators will take away ideas for educating their classes about eclipses and ideas for educating the public on what causes eclipses and how to view them safely. This information will be a result of our STEM education center's eclipse outreach and its effectiveness.

SPEAKERS:
Alice Steimle (Director: University, MS), Christian Clark (University of Mississippi: University, MS)

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