2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

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Rooms and times subject to change.
5 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

International STEM Career Role Models: Curated Children’s Books at the Forefront of K-6 STEM Lessons

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2201


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Research indicates that teachers need to address STEM career awareness and connect to students’ lives. Our goal is to highlight STEM careers/role models across the globe through using children’s books to anchor STEM lessons. The books are chosen to cover various peoples/cultures from around the world. Using books to engage students in thinking about how STEM connects to various cultures across the globe can be a powerful learning tool and can lead to important classroom discourse regarding cultural awareness (Yoon, 2022). For example, Tu Youyou’s Discovery: Finding a Cure for Malaria by Songju Ma Daemicke focuses on returning to Chinese herbal medicine to discover treatment for malaria. In the same manner, One Plastic Bag by Miranda Paul, highlights Istaou Ceesay’s true story from Gambia. The main character in this book started a grassroots movement to recycle plastic bags since they were causing pollution and negatively impacting livestock. Participants will be actively engaged!

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will engage in hands-on STEM mini-lessons in small groups. Each participant will explore several picture books highlighting STEM careers and people from across the globe.

SPEAKERS:
Sumreen Asim (Indiana University Southeast: New Albany, IN)

Mountain Rescue: Recasting STEM Students as Middle School MacGyvers

Friday, October 27 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Aligned to Next Generation Science Standards, our collaborative card game called Mountain Rescue engages players in STEM learning while immersed in an authentic and thrilling context: seeking rescue from a plane crash. Designed for grades 5-8, the game is playable in about 30-minutes. Preliminary play-test results indicate that students are engaged and feel the game has value for collaborative learning. During gameplay, players utilize collaborative skills essential to STEM careers by working together to solve puzzles related to electricity, physics, chemistry, and engineering design. Yet, to convert our research into effective classroom practice–we need you. Please stop by our poster and share your feedback with us. We would love to hear your thoughts about gameplay, game design, and potential implementation issues which we will incorporate into our next round of funding. Maybe you would even like to have the next version of Mountain Rescue come to your classroom!

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn about the collaborative STEM card game called Mountain Rescue. Presenters will share the design, gameplay basics, and research findings. Presenters will engage attendees in lively discourse around necessary improvements and implementation issues.

SPEAKERS:
Denise Bressler (Chief Ideologist: Liberty Corner, NJ)

METRICS: Maximizing Engagement Through Regular Immersion in Computer Science

Saturday, October 28 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2101


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Winchester is 1 of 10 public schools in the country, out of 43 schools in total, to receive the coveted Education Innovation and Research Early-Phase grant from the U.S. Department of Education. Through the Metrics program, students at John Kerr Elementary School and Garland Quarles Elementary School have an immersive experience with computer science and computational thinking which are driving the 21st century economy. This session is meant to be a dissemination of our five year project, to share what we have learned about immersing students and teachers in grades K-4 in computers science, and to provide resources and time for participants to experience some of our activities and build a trajectory for building their own computer science program.

TAKEAWAYS:
Build your own pathway to develop techies {thinkers} and tinkerers in your space.

SPEAKERS:
Amy Thomas (John Kerr Elementary School: Winchester, VA), Jennifer Ramsey (Garland R. Quarles Elementary School: Winchester, VA), Jennifer LaBombard-Daniels (Winchester Public Schools: Winchester, VA)

Expanding the Innovation Ecosystem: Removing Barriers to Reach All Students

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2204


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

As science teachers, we understand the importance of innovation in driving progress and economic growth. However, many students living in high-barrier areas across the country lack access to the resources and opportunities necessary to participate in the innovation ecosystem. This presentation proposes strategies for expanding the innovation ecosystem and engaging these underserved students in innovation activities. We will discuss the Innovation Atlas, a valuable resource for identifying innovation clusters and potential partnerships. We will also explore ways to connect students with innovation centers, industry mentors, and entrepreneurship programs. By expanding the innovation ecosystem and breaking down barriers, we can inspire the next generation of innovators and ensure that all students have the chance to contribute to our shared future.

TAKEAWAYS:
Our mission is to inspire inclusive U.S. innovation and global competitiveness. This starts in the K-12 classrooms by identifying and breaking down barriers that prevent students from learning how to be inventors and innovators.

SPEAKERS:
Jorge Valdes (U.S. Patent and Trademark Office: Alexandria, VA), Kathleen Lanman (U.S. Patent and Trademark Office: Alexandria, VA)

Improving Science Literacy with Problem-Based Learning

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2101



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Slides Science Literacy and PBL

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Using research and facts to support decisions is a skill our students need to learn. Problem-based learning allows students to come up with multiple solutions to a problem and then, through the use of research, experimentation, and failure, students learn to scientifically support their thoughts and ideas. Problem-based learning helps students learn science content while also building important 21st century skills and lifelong practices. In a world where content facts are readily available and resources are waiting to me explores, students have the opportunity to see how their learning relates to current careers, as well as the opportunity to share their insights with others. Students get to explore literature while engaging in problem solving and science exploration.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will gain a better understanding of how to improve literacy while incorporating problem-based learning into the required units of study through discussion and brainstorming with peers on the use of Problem-Based practices.

SPEAKERS:
Charlsie Prosser (Education Professor and Chair: Baldwin City, KS), Tara Burnham (Assistant Professor of Education)

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