2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

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FILTERS APPLIED:Research to Practice, Environmental Science

 

Rooms and times subject to change.
13 results
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How board games can engage your students and develop environmental literacy

Thursday, October 26 • 10:50 AM - 11:50 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 1501 B


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: Adventerra Games North America LLC

N/A

SPEAKERS:
Sue Mundell (Adventerra Games North America: Boston, MA), Bryan Mundell (Founder), Lauren Kelly (Crowley ISD: Fort Worth, TX)

Using Photovoice to Promote Undergraduate Students' Socioscientific Reasoning Skills

Friday, October 27 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2214


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Socioscientific issues are complex, open-ended social issues with embedded scientific content and processes. This presentation aims to foster undergraduate students' reasoning skills necessary to navigate these issues. Specifically, a photovoice activity was added to a water quality unit in a scientific inquiry course. First, during the data collection, students were asked to take photos that could best represent the status of the ecological system of the stream. Second, they worked as groups in the classroom to analyze the different pieces of evidence and create a visual representation where they can organize all the evidence in the photos. Lastly, each group presented their photovoice product to the whole class and explained each piece of their evidence and how they indicate the different aspects of water quality and the overall water quality. The activity will be presented and supporting instructional materials and tools will be provided in this presentation.

TAKEAWAYS:
This presentation will show how to promote students' reasoning skills necessary to negotiate with socioscientific issues through a photovoice activity, and provide supporting instructional materials and tools.

SPEAKERS:
Conghui Liu (Ph.D. Candidate: Bloomington, MO)

Using Research-Based Practices to Overcome Plant Awareness Disparity By Uncovering Students' Botanical Histories

Friday, October 27 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2104 A


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

This session will focus on sharing instructional modules that have been developed to facilitate relationships between herbaria and high school students to highlight the importance of plants and preserving botanical specimens. Many times plants are overlooked or considered less significant than animals. This research-backed perspective is known as Plant Awareness Disparity. These free, research-based modules allow students to investigate their own botanical history by connecting with plants that are important to them and their families, then experience the entire process of collecting, mounting, cataloging, and digitizing their specimen. There are 10 modules that are aligned with the NRC K-12 Framework and heavily rely upon student-centered and place-based learning. All participants will be given access to the modules and encouraged to interact with the module developers as they implement the activities.

TAKEAWAYS:
Many times, plants are overlooked and considered less significant than animals. This is known as Plant Awareness Disparity. Participants in this session will learn about free instructional modules that will help high school students connect with plants through exploring their own botanical history.

SPEAKERS:
Kelly Moore (Tennessee Tech: Cookeville, TN)

Discovering Lemur Diversity: Teaching Conservation Genetics Through an Authentic Case Study

Friday, October 27 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2504 B


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: miniPCR bio

Bring molecular techniques to Ecology and Evolution units. Join an expedition to Madagascar to decide if an extinct lemur species has been rediscovered! Test DNA with gel electrophoresis, build phylogenetic trees, and analyze authentic field data from the Duke Lemur Center.

SPEAKERS:
Allison Nishitani, PhD (miniPCR bio: Cambridge, MA)

Fire: Friend or Foe? 5E Lesson

Friday, October 27 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Using the authenticity framework, students are guided through a 5E lesson, to answer the essential question “How does fire impact prairie ecosystems?” Embedded are real-world connections, the construction of knowledge, student inquiry, and student-centered learning. Lesson snapshot: Students will: Engage with various prairie ecosystem photos and images of prairie fires, and write descriptive words that come to mind. Explore a map of North American prairies, and complete an I Notice, I Wonder; we will explore articles to begin a CER to answer the essential question. Explain by participating in an activity to sort goods and services based on their knowledge of prairies. Extend by viewing an Individual Career and Academic Plan (ICAP) video to learn about the importance of using fire to improve plants and ecosystems, and how indigenous tribes used fire for agriculture. Evaluate the completion of their CER using their notes from the lesson and a list of prescribed vocabulary terms.

TAKEAWAYS:
HS teachers will have a ready-to-use, standards-based 5E lesson that they can use in their classrooms immediately. And it’s FREE!

SPEAKERS:
Teresa Randall (The University of Oklahoma: Norman, OK)

Culturally Inclusive Teaching in the Garden

Friday, October 27 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Discussion of culture is often missing in garden-based education. To share and validate the interests of our culturally diverse students, we will delve deep into the significance of culture as it relates to food and gardens and also as it relates to the diverse populations with whom we work. Through student voices and examples we will share the principles of culturally responsive garden education that honors diversity and inclusion. Join us as we explore ways to celebrate and center culture through garden-based learning. School gardens have many benefits for students which include helping students make nutritious choices, encouraging students to be environmentally conscious, and providing experiential learning. Research shows that students who participate in garden-based science curriculum score significantly higher on science achievement tests than students in a traditional classroom-based control group. This garden-enhanced achievement benefits both boys and girls equally.

TAKEAWAYS:
By their nature, gardens embody diversity. Garden education is increasingly recognized as an interdisciplinary approach that integrates academic goals, health and wellness, place-based education, and community connections and relationships.

SPEAKERS:
Lindsey Noonan (Topeka Public Schools USD 501: Topeka, KS), Rhonda Gadino (Topeka Public Schools: No City, No State)

Radon Research Summer Teacher Workshop at Georgia State University

Friday, October 27 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Prolonged exposure to radon, a colorless, radioactive, noble gas, is the second-leading cause of lung cancer. Researchers at Georgia State University (GSU) and GSU Perimeter College are conducting research to measure levels of radon gas in metropolitan Atlanta with support from the U. S. Department of Agriculture and National Science Foundation. GSU researchers are testing soil samples and remotely monitoring radon levels. To disseminate this research to the broader community, the researchers hosted a week-long radon research workshop for 6-12 grade teachers in DeKalb County Public Schools, Georgia, in June 2022. Four teachers attended the summer radon workshop at the GSU Perimeter College-Decatur Campus. They participated in experiments on soil and water quality testing, soil porosity measurements, gene editing for cancer treatment, and virtual reality lung exploration. The project was highly successful and received positive feedback. This poster will detail the workshop experience.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how universities can successfully partner with local districts to provide research experiences for teachers to expand their content knowledge and lab experience. This project demonstrates the broader impact of the project’s initial goal of measuring radon levels in Atlanta.

SPEAKERS:
Samantha Andrews (GSU Perimeter College: No City, No State)

Using ChatGPT To Your Advantage in Your Junior High/Middle School Science Class

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2203



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1mCHvN2ZIcyGL2RZOIHb1qsQ4bR--HnLv?usp=sharing
Presentation

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

By utilizing ChatGPT, start-ups can provide students with a starting point for research by offering them foundational knowledge on a variety of subjects. The use of superheroes to teach the periodic table, for example, could provide students with a fun and engaging way to learn about chemistry. Similarly, focusing on environmental concerns such as ocean acidification can help students understand the importance of conservation and sustainability. Additionally, warm-up activities can be an effective way to build relationships and foster collaboration between students. Whether it be through icebreakers or team-building exercises, getting to know one another can help students work together more effectively and create a more positive learning environment. Overall, utilizing ChatGPT can be an effective way for teachers to create engaging and informative content for students. By providing them with a foundation of knowledge, start-ups can empower students to take control of their own learning.

TAKEAWAYS:
One takeaway from this session is that you will understand that ChatGPT is a powerful tool for teachers. This application will allow you to answer questions or ideas you have and improve research activities that might be difficult for students.

SPEAKERS:
Ricardo Padilla (Brookhurst Jr HIgh School)

Community Science Data Talks

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 A


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Community Science Data Talks are short 10-15 minute classroom conversations prompted by local data and data visualizations, similar to a number talk or a notice and wonder activity. In such, students will begin with data visualizations and add lenses to examine their place, such as historical (e.g. policy of "redlining"), ecological (e.g. amount of tree canopy cover), socioeconomic (e.g. rental burden), personal (e.g. photographs they take). Throughout a Community Science Data Talk, students are positioned as the most knowledgeable agents about their communities and, by experiencing multiple data talks over time, the accumulation of multiple lenses on the same place should support students in making sense of how these places come to be over time and promote discussions about how science and math can help them understand, advocate for, and appreciate the places they live. We will share lessons learned from piloting these data talks with teachers in multiple countries and contexts.

TAKEAWAYS:
You will takeaway specific teaching tools including a description of the thinking behind a Community Science Data Talk, a how-to planning and implementation guide, and ideas for how to navigate student emotions towards collective actions around local environmental impacts.

SPEAKERS:
Imogen Herrick (Assistant Professor of STEM Education: , CA), Michael Lawson (Teaching Assistant Professor)

Internationalizing Instruction on Climate Change: Examine the New Approach to Address Students’ Misconceptions and Develop Reasoning Skills

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2214


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

This work is based on the result of a design-based research on internationalizing climate change instruction. During the instruction, the instructor introduced the content knowledge on climate change through a lab activity. Next, the students visited six stations to understand the impact of climate change on different areas of the world. They were also asked to identify the patterns and trends associated with various global maps demonstrating global climate change's differential impacts and complete a provided worksheet based on this gallery-walk activity. After the gallery-walk activity, students were asked to respond through a scientific report to the claim, “Climate change is the great equalizer and equally affects everyone in the world.” The students constructed a scientific explanation either in support of or against the provided claim. The workshop participants will experience the activity and discuss how to adopt it in their classrooms.

TAKEAWAYS:
How to internationalize climate change instruction for global competence.

SPEAKERS:
Shukufe Rahman (Graduate Student: Bloomington, IN), Conghui Liu (Ph.D. Candidate: Bloomington, MO)

Utilizing Water Quality as an Over-Arching Research Project in General Chemistry I

Saturday, October 28 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2205



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Link to presentation slides and resources

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Water quality is everyone’s concern; we all need water to live healthy lives. Between Flint, MI, and Jackson, MS, it’s important that citizens know how to assess their water quality from chemical and societal perspectives. This project introduces students to water quality, how our water is cleaned for drinking purposes, and how socio-economic influences impact water quality in the US. Students apply general chemistry I concepts to the water quality to understand how the Flint and Jackson Water Crises occurred, experimentally assess a water sample from their home, compare their results it to their local water quality report, draw conclusions based on their findings, and explore if what happened in Flint and Jackson could happen to them. Students conduct literature research as a part of this project and complete a final report on their findings and conclusions.

TAKEAWAYS:
Water quality is everyone's concern. This presentation will show educators how to equip students to apply their chemical knowledge to assess water quality and advocate for themselves and others.

SPEAKERS:
Catherine Haslag (Riverland Community College)

Fatty Acid Methyl Esters from Native Seed Plants of New Mexico as an Alternative Biofuel

Saturday, October 28 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Due to the increasing environmental concerns among consumers, governments worldwide are focusing on adopting clean mobility solutions through alternative fuel. The team decided to gather leftover seeds to extract oils that will serve as our source of FAMEThe team used grape, pumpkin, watermelon, pomegranate, and cactus seed oils as a source of fatty acid methyl esters or biodiesel as an Alternative Biofuel. Results show that all plant seeds are a feasible source of biodiesel, pumpkin. on the other hand, oil from the pumpkin seeds shows remarkable results wherein it produces 100 mL of oil from 500 grams of seeds and it has also the highest height (9 inches) of flame when measured. It was also observed that it easily captured the fire during the flammability test. On the other hand, the team observed that the flame color of most of the biodiesel was orange, except for the grape seed which shows a more yellow flame.

TAKEAWAYS:
Making of Fatty Acid Methyl Esters (Biodiesel) Out of Native Plant Seeds

SPEAKERS:
Roy Basa (Zuni Public School District: Zuni, NM)

The Cultural Connections Process Model: Experiencing Curriculum Products Co-Produced with Indigenous Communities

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
CCPM Presentation.pdf

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Recent and ongoing research uses an Indigenous methodology to formalize the Cultural Connections Process Model (CCPM)--an approach for authentic co-production of educational resources by Indigenous communities and education/research organizations. This session will showcase the model as well as emergent research findings, and provide hands-on opportunities to explore the resources created when the model was developed and implemented in several Alaska Native communities. These place-based resources are built to target Next Generation Science Standards as well as focus on community priorities, and Indigenous education frameworks, Alaska Native languages, cultural values and cultural content standards. All the resources created using this model are freely and publicly available on project websites, and work is underway to create a long-term repository for these and future CCPM resources.

TAKEAWAYS:
The goal of this session is to share ongoing research formalizing the Cultural Connections Process Model and explore free videos, hands-on lessons, and more, created using the model. Attendees will develop an understanding of how to implement the model and access the free classroom resources.

SPEAKERS:
Lynda McGilvary (Geophysical Institute: Fairbanks, AK), Lori Schoening (Geophysical Institute: Fairbanks, AK)

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