2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

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Rooms and times subject to change.
20 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Expanding Access to STEM and the Arts: Nutcracker Ballet + STEM

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2208



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA Presentation Powerpoint
Here is the Powerpoint used in the presentation.
Nutcracker Ballet + STEM - Lesson Plans and Registration Link
Nutcracker Choreography Video
This video goes along with the Nutcracker Choreography Challenge lesson.

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

The Nutcracker Ballet + STEM learning event was created to expand access to high-quality STEM and art learning experiences for K-3 students. Created in partnership with Stephens Auditorium, this free program is based upon current research that includes, but is not limited to, the report Science and Engineering in Preschool Through Elementary Grades: The Brilliance of Children and the Strengths of Educators (2022). In this presentation, we will first overview the research-base and development process. Then, participants will be introduced to the free hands-on STEM + arts challenges. These engaging challenges were designed for easy implementation with low-cost materials. All challenges use the experiential learning model of Do, Reflect, and Apply. This will then be followed by photos and video from the event to add depth and provide details on the experience. To conclude, impact data and discussion around lessons learned will be shared.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn about an educational model for integrating STEM and the arts, while gaining access to free educational materials to support a similar program in their area.

SPEAKERS:
Sara Nelson (Iowa State University: Ames, IA)

Lessons from Our Classrooms: Successfully Supporting Emerging Multilinguals

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Jay McShann A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Slides with links to resources on slide 27

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Participants will learn research-based methods for supporting emerging multilinguals in their science classroom. These methods will be modeled by sharing sections of Biology labs that have been modified to support English learners. At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to take home sample lessons and labs specifically developed for a multilingual science classroom. Teaching methods presented are based on research and actual classroom experience, developed collaboratively by a team including a science teacher, English as a new language teacher, and a language development researcher. Labs shared with participants are designed to foster critical thinking while incorporating appropriate scaffolding. Lab handouts for participants to take back to their classrooms will include the following topics: scientific method, ecology, enzymes, biomolecules, cell transport, photosynthesis, and cellular respiration.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn and practice teaching techniques for supporting English learners in their science class while engaging with lessons that model these procedures.

SPEAKERS:
Tina Ahmadi (PhD Student: Indianapolis, IN)

Empowering Parents’ Support for Early Science Through Home-to-School Connections

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2207


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

This presentation will discuss the importance of home-to-school connections in fostering early science opportunities through everyday activities. We explore research on family-school partnerships and the value of incorporating families' experiential knowledge into the curriculum to promote equity and inclusivity in early childhood. The Early Science Framework, an infant, toddler, and preschool adaptation of the Framework for K-12 Science Education, provides a research-based approach to early science learning that connects science to children's everyday lives. We will discuss how teachers can use this framework to create a more dynamic curriculum. Practical resources and ideas for teacher professional development will be provided to support culturally responsive preschool science engagement. By promoting family-school partnerships and bringing research into practice, we can create a more engaging learning environment for children and stronger partnerships between families and schools.

TAKEAWAYS:
We provide resources and examples incorporating experiential knowledge from families into the classroom, connecting children’s learning to their everyday lives. These home-to-school connections provide culturally relevant and equity-informed opportunities for high-quality teaching and learning.

SPEAKERS:
Daryl Greenfield (University of Miami: Miami, FL), Chabely Figuereo (Graduate Student: Coral Gables, FL)

Promoting Student Agency Through Equitable Phenomena

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Handout (Phenomena)
Session Slides (Phenomena).pptx.pdf

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

A collaborative team of teachers and researchers share results from a research project aimed at leveraging compelling and equitable phenomena in NGSS-designed instruction with multilingual learners (MLs). Using our yearlong fifth-grade curriculum, we share our approach to selecting phenomena from both science and equity perspectives. From a science perspective, we ensured that a unit anchoring phenomenon (a) promotes deep science and engineering understanding, (b) integrates science disciplines, (c) sustains a 9-week unit, and (d) raises awareness of societal concerns. From an equity perspective, we ensured that a unit anchoring phenomenon (a) creates relevance for all students, (b) utilizes funds of knowledge, (c) provides context for language, and (d) promotes participation of all students. We focus on the impact of using compelling and equitable phenomena with MLs and present case studies of two teachers who implemented such phenomena across four units over one school year.

TAKEAWAYS:
By using phenomena and problems that meet both science and equity criteria, teachers ensure that all students, especially MLs, have agency to make connections to the world around them, see science as relevant to their lives and future careers, and see themselves as scientists and engineers.

SPEAKERS:
Iovanna Williams (Science Teacher: , NY), Adriana Romanzo (Elementary Science Teacher: New York, NY), Abigail Schwenger (Research Associate)

Latinas in STEM - Using An Asset-Based Mindset to Encourage Latina STEM Persistence

Friday, October 27 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2211



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA KC 2023_ Using an Asset-Based Approach to Identify Sources of Persistence for Latinas in Selecting STEM Undergraduate Degrees.pdf

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

The population of Latinx students is rapidly growing in the United States, yet Latinas are underrepresented in STEM careers compared to their peers of other identities. This could be in part due to the deficit-based ideology that has historically been utilized when describing this group's success in academic disciplines. This presentation will highlight the findings of a recent qualitative study that asked Latina STEM undergraduate students to reflect on their sources of persistence in high school STEM coursework. The study participants’ responses were correlated with Yosso's (2005) “Community Cultural Wealth Model" to identify their unique sources of strength and persistence in STEM. The study findings will serve as the foundation for recommendations to be made for the implementation of equitable and asset-based shifts to promote Latinas’ persistence and success in STEM at the secondary levels.

TAKEAWAYS:
Using an asset-based approach, participants will engage in social justice-themed conversations to equitably encourage Latina high school students’ persistence in STEM coursework. Ready-to-use strategies will be featured to promote greater perseverance in STEM for Latinas.

SPEAKERS:
Nicole Vitello Lowell (Charles H. Barrows STEM Academy: North Windham, CT)

Using Research-Based Practices to Overcome Plant Awareness Disparity By Uncovering Students' Botanical Histories

Friday, October 27 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2104 A


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

This session will focus on sharing instructional modules that have been developed to facilitate relationships between herbaria and high school students to highlight the importance of plants and preserving botanical specimens. Many times plants are overlooked or considered less significant than animals. This research-backed perspective is known as Plant Awareness Disparity. These free, research-based modules allow students to investigate their own botanical history by connecting with plants that are important to them and their families, then experience the entire process of collecting, mounting, cataloging, and digitizing their specimen. There are 10 modules that are aligned with the NRC K-12 Framework and heavily rely upon student-centered and place-based learning. All participants will be given access to the modules and encouraged to interact with the module developers as they implement the activities.

TAKEAWAYS:
Many times, plants are overlooked and considered less significant than animals. This is known as Plant Awareness Disparity. Participants in this session will learn about free instructional modules that will help high school students connect with plants through exploring their own botanical history.

SPEAKERS:
Kelly Moore (Tennessee Tech: Cookeville, TN)

Investigating With the All of Us Data Browser

Friday, October 27 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

The historic All of Us Research Program by the National Institutes of Health aims to engage one million or more people across the US as research participants and partners. These individuals are providing data to build one of the largest, most diverse, and broadly accessible datasets ever assembled. De-identified, aggregated data collected by the All of Us Research program is publicly available via the interactive Data Browser. Participants, researchers, and other members of the public may use this online tool to learn more about the All of Us participant community and explore summary data. We’d like to introduce teachers and students to the power of “big data” and support them in using the Data Browser to conduct authentic investigations related to science content standards. The poster session will include an introduction to the All of Us Research Program, the Data Browser, and paper-based and multimedia classroom resources, and use it to investigate research questions.

TAKEAWAYS:
The All of Us Research Program is building the largest, most diverse biomedical database of its kind. The program is making de-identified, aggregated data from the database available to the public through a Data Browser and providing resources to help students navigate it.

SPEAKERS:
Molly Malone (The University of Utah: Salt Lake City, UT)

Playing Games: A Study Into the Effectiveness of the Inclusion of Gamification in Science Lessons and the Impact of Engagement of Exceptional Learners

Friday, October 27 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

This poster focuses on the study that aims to investigate the effectiveness of gamification in science classes for exceptional learners, specifically those with emotional behavioral disorders (EBD) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The study seeks to determine if gamification can increase engagement in science classes for exceptional learners, identify methods for incorporating gamification, identify the specific components of lessons that can be gamified, and measure the level of engagement of exceptional learners in science classes. The study includes 11 exceptional learners from a Title 1 alternative school in Florida. The participants come from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds, including some designated as homeless and living in group homes. The majority of the participants are male and African American. The study highlights the importance of engaging exceptional learners in science classes to improve their academic performance and prevent negative attitudes towards education.

TAKEAWAYS:
Using gamification in science classes can increase exceptional learners' engagement and interest in science. Educators can use the study's insights to gamify specific components of science lessons and improve engagement, which can aid in closing the achievement gap for exceptional learners.

SPEAKERS:
Lacie Conner (ESE Science Teacher, EBD)

Toward Equitable Science Teaching and Learning: Language Shifts in the NGSS Classroom

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2102 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Handout (Language Shifts)
Session Slides (Language Shifts).pptx.pdf

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

A collaborative team of teachers and researchers share findings from a research project aimed at integrating science and language with fifth-grade multilingual learners (MLs). First, we describe three language instructional shifts: modalities, registers, and interactions. Then, we share how two teachers enacted these shifts over the course of a physical science unit and present classroom examples of how they (a) used nonlinguistic modalities (e.g., models) as an essential way to engage all students in the Science and Engineering Practices, (b) treated specialized language (i.e., a more formal register) as a product of learning science rather than a prerequisite, and (c) leveraged the affordances of different registers (i.e., everyday, specialized) based on the different communicative demands across different types of interactions. Finally, we provide suggestions for enacting these language instructional shifts with MLs across a range of classroom contexts.

TAKEAWAYS:
As all students, and especially multilingual learners, make sense of phenomena and problems, they use multiple modalities (both linguistic and visual) and a range of registers (from everyday to specialized) across different types of interactions to engage in communication of science ideas.

SPEAKERS:
Iovanna Williams (Science Teacher: , NY), Adriana Romanzo (Elementary Science Teacher: New York, NY), Abigail Schwenger (Research Associate)

Scaffolding Learning to Engage Diverse Learners in Informational Science Text

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 B


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

During this workshop we will present and engage participants in literacy and math-based strategies supported by research that science, mathematics, English language arts, and special education middle school teachers can use scaffold learning to engage in informational science text and argumentation connected to life sciences (e.g., vaping) for diverse learners in their classrooms. By the end of the workshop participants will be able to: 1. Define content and instructional scaffolding and how these types of scaffolds can be used to structure learning experiences to engage diverse learners in making meaningful sense of informational text. 2. Identify literacy- and math-based strategies that connect to content and instructional scaffolds that are designed to structure meaningful learning experiences to engage diverse learners in informational text. 3. Implement strategies within their content instruction that will scaffold learning to engage their diverse learners in informational text.

TAKEAWAYS:
All learners, including diverse learners, with the right instructional scaffolds can meaningfully engage in complex informational science text.

SPEAKERS:
TARA GREEN (student: , MO), William Folk (University of Missouri: Columbia, MO), Amy Lannin (University of Missouri: Columbia, MO), Cassandra Smith (University of Missouri: Columbia, MO), Delinda Van Garderen (University of Missouri: Columbia, MO)

Culturally Responsive STEM: Care, Culture, & Consistency

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2206


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Cultural misunderstandings often occur in many environments because of cultural norms that are ingrained in different people from their home environment, community, and heritage. This is especially prevalent in many STEM fields. People must be taught situational appropriateness for the different settings without diminishing the value of their cultural norms. Often these misunderstandings occur when dealing with interactions. Using the "3C" Model of Care, Culture, and Consistency, will allow educators to engage with them in more positive atmospheres that promote student learning in STEM for all. Showing students that you care, recognizing their cultures, and being consistent will enable STEM teachers and students to have a better understanding of one another, and will also create a positive learning environment where students feel valued and effective enough to want to pursue careers in STEM fields.

TAKEAWAYS:
By the end of this session, attendees will learn about their own biases as it pertains to student ability and be able to use the "3C Model" of Care, Culture, & Consistency to address their misconceptions and better service students of various cultural backgrounds.

SPEAKERS:
Kristen Antoine-Morse (East Baton Rouge Parish School System: Baton Rouge, LA)

Research to Practice: Professional Development that Works for all NGSS Classrooms

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2208



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
KC2023_Research to Practice: Professional Development that Works for all NGSS
Research to Practice Professional Development that Works for all NGSS Handout

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

The Institute for Quality Science Teaching at the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago is invested in helping teachers effectively implement the NGSS. Chicago area teachers use a variety of curricula, so we are developing a framework of high-leverage pedagogical practices that can be used with any NGSS-aligned curriculum to enhance science teaching and learning. The framework was designed with a focus on equity. All the pedagogies are backed by research demonstrating their effectiveness. Our goal is to move research into classroom practices that are accessible to all science teachers. We’ll review pedagogical focuses, particular pedagogical practices, and classroom strategies that can be most helpful in implementing the NGSS in classrooms. We’re developing a “how-to” guide for teaching with the NGSS, no matter which curriculum you’re using. We’re very excited to have a chance to share our thinking with teachers and to hear their thoughts and suggestions about our approach.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will gain a deeper understanding of high-leverage pedagogical practices that directly support teaching with the NGSS, and strategies to implement some of these practices in the science classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Garrett Gray (Sr. Educator, School and Teacher Programs: Chicago, IL), Tara Flett (Sr. Educator IQST: Chicago, IL)

Supporting Preservice and New Teachers to Understand & Implement the NGSS

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 H


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

We will engage with some examples of what has been used to prepare preservice and support novice teachers over the last 6 years leveraging HQIM to assist teachers with making sense of and planning to implement the NGSS. The session will cover how HQIM have been curated and modified to help teachers see examples of resources designed for the NGSS and then use those resources to plan and modify their instruction. Other resources for instruction and planning will also be shared.

TAKEAWAYS:
Ideas for ways use HQIM to help teachers understand and implement the vision of the Framework for Science Education, as well as resources to scaffold unpacking 3-D standards.

SPEAKERS:
Spencer Martin (Kansas City Kansas Public Schools: Kansas City, KS), Matt Krehbiel (OpenSciEd: New York, NY)

Utilizing Water Quality as an Over-Arching Research Project in General Chemistry I

Saturday, October 28 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2205



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Link to presentation slides and resources

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Water quality is everyone’s concern; we all need water to live healthy lives. Between Flint, MI, and Jackson, MS, it’s important that citizens know how to assess their water quality from chemical and societal perspectives. This project introduces students to water quality, how our water is cleaned for drinking purposes, and how socio-economic influences impact water quality in the US. Students apply general chemistry I concepts to the water quality to understand how the Flint and Jackson Water Crises occurred, experimentally assess a water sample from their home, compare their results it to their local water quality report, draw conclusions based on their findings, and explore if what happened in Flint and Jackson could happen to them. Students conduct literature research as a part of this project and complete a final report on their findings and conclusions.

TAKEAWAYS:
Water quality is everyone's concern. This presentation will show educators how to equip students to apply their chemical knowledge to assess water quality and advocate for themselves and others.

SPEAKERS:
Catherine Haslag (Riverland Community College)

5-6-7-8: How Dance Class Can Teach Us About Best Practices For Instruction

Saturday, October 28 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2102 A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
PH_5-6-7-8_ How Dance Class Can Teach Us About Best Practices for Instruction.docx
Slides_5-6-7-8_ How Dance Class Can Teach Us About Best Practices for Instruction.pptx

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

In this interactive workshop, through the modality of dance class, participants engage in a inquiry-based, hands-on experience allowing independent and collaborative exploration of new content. Using peer conversations to deepen understanding, and a whole group debrief, participants naturally progress towards acquiring domain-specific terminology, culminating in a design challenge demonstrating application of knowledge. Analytical reflection of the experience, instructional approach, and supports, allows connections to participants’ own educational environments. Modeled after an inclusive framework, the experience demonstrates instructional strategies that support all learners while providing equitable opportunities for access to content. Including elements of differentiation, student choice, and the power of kinesthetic learning, the research-based experience builds knowledge while embracing and reinforcing key pedagogical ideas, reflecting best practices for science instruction.

TAKEAWAYS:
Experience best practices for science instruction including elements like differentiation, student choice, the power of kinesthetic learning, and more, all wrapped up in a research-based instructional model using an inclusive framework approach.

SPEAKERS:
Isaac Stauffer (Great Minds: Washington, DC)

NASA Science Activation Strategies for Creating Authentic STEM Learning in Rural Communities and Classrooms

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2202



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NASA Rural Presentation.pptx

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Curious about establishing sustainable relationships within rural communities? Join NASA Science Activation members who live and work in rural communities for an interactive discussion about building reciprocity, relationships, and project sustainability while enhancing NASA STEM education experiences for learners of all ages. To broaden participation and learn about the vast knowledge and practices shared among the members, NASA conducted interviews with the awarded project members working with rural communities, coded their stories, and found emerging themes. NASA Science Activation aims to share the lessons learned, solutions, challenges, and recommendations of these projects, which may assist you by providing best practices for engaging your community; providing diversity, equity, inclusion, and accessibility tips for reaching underserved audiences, and providing opportunities to enlist NASA support and bring subject matter experts into your classroom or school district.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will receive connections to NASA subject matter experts working with rural communities as well as virtual resources and future opportunities for classroom support and collaboration.

SPEAKERS:
Rachael Arens (Curriculum Specialist: Bennington, NE), Matthew Cass (Physics and Astronomy Instructor: Sylva, NC)

Expanding the Innovation Ecosystem: Removing Barriers to Reach All Students

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2204


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

As science teachers, we understand the importance of innovation in driving progress and economic growth. However, many students living in high-barrier areas across the country lack access to the resources and opportunities necessary to participate in the innovation ecosystem. This presentation proposes strategies for expanding the innovation ecosystem and engaging these underserved students in innovation activities. We will discuss the Innovation Atlas, a valuable resource for identifying innovation clusters and potential partnerships. We will also explore ways to connect students with innovation centers, industry mentors, and entrepreneurship programs. By expanding the innovation ecosystem and breaking down barriers, we can inspire the next generation of innovators and ensure that all students have the chance to contribute to our shared future.

TAKEAWAYS:
Our mission is to inspire inclusive U.S. innovation and global competitiveness. This starts in the K-12 classrooms by identifying and breaking down barriers that prevent students from learning how to be inventors and innovators.

SPEAKERS:
Jorge Valdes (U.S. Patent and Trademark Office: Alexandria, VA), Kathleen Lanman (U.S. Patent and Trademark Office: Alexandria, VA)

Creating Equity for Black Science Students

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2211



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Coding data into themes.pdf
This is an example of how to code qualitative data
Creating Equity for Black Science Students Notes.pdf
These are the attendee notes for this presentation.
Creating Equity for Black Science Students.pptx
This is the PowerPoint presentation file for my hands-on workshop.
phenomenological-study-cultural-immersion-graduate-counselling-students-student-guide.pdf
This is an article about how to investigate phenomenological data.
Student Survey About Advanced Classes
This is an example survey used for this research project.
What is coding.docx
This is a word document that describes how to code qualitative data.

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

In this presentation, I will describe how an action research study with a phenomenological qualitative design can be used to examine reasons that reluctant Black students use to not register with advanced science classes. My session will describe how to employ a community of inquiry to identify and remove barriers for underrepresented students. Qualitative data from focus group interviews with student participants will be presented, and I will show how a community of inquiry can analyze data. Attendees will learn about school changes proposed by a community of inquiry to reduce or mitigate barriers that underrepresented students encounter. I will also explain the benefits of iteratively revised proposals based on student participant feedback. Additionally, the implementation of proposed school changes will be discussed.

TAKEAWAYS:
Qualitative research provides educators with direct knowledge from reluctant participants. This session provides attendees with tools to assist in problem-solving and removing barriers for underrepresented students in advanced science classes.

SPEAKERS:
Diane Vrobel (Archbishop Hoban High School: Akron, OH)

Reducing Gender Disproportionality and Increasing Enrollment in Advanced STEM Courses for Female High School Students with Advanced Placement Potential

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2504 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA National Conference Presentation - Gender Disproportionality - Observations, Initial Findings and Action Steps to Achieve Gender Parity.pptx
Protocol and Criteria for School Counselors to Increase Female Student Enrollment in AT Physics.pdf
Protocol and Criteria for Teachers to Increase Female Student Enrollment in AT Physics.pdf

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

The purpose of this program is to develop an understanding of the problem of gender disproportionality as it impacts enrollment in advanced STEM courses. Quantitative and qualitative data will be reviewed along with the foundation for the development of models and intervention strategies school districts can develop to begin to reverse this trend. Advanced Placement Physics-C Potential was used as a factor to determine which female students to target for intervention, with the anticipated result being a more proportional enrollment in the targeted advanced STEM course. The research revealed that an encouraging message from school counselors, teachers, and peers, delivered along with awareness of individual AP Physics-C Potential, can promote an increased level of female student enrollment in advanced STEM courses such as AT or AP Physics and reduce the phenomenon of gender disproportionality which precipitated this study.

TAKEAWAYS:
Research-backed models of intervention to reduce gender disproportionality will be presented, along with strategies for implementation by school districts.

SPEAKERS:
Richard Stec (West Windsor-Plainsboro High School: Plainsboro, NJ)

Using Photovoice to see Climate Change in your Everyday Life

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2201


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Heat domes! Wildfires! Drought! Students across the world are experiencing the impact of climate change in their everyday lives, but often students feel hopelessness and fear when thinking and learning about these issues. In this workshop, we will discuss Photovoice, a flexible (e.g. low-floor, high-ceiling task) classroom practice that unpacks students’ ideas, experiences, and emotions through critical reflection on self-generated photos of climate impacts in their own community. Through individual and collaborative reflection, students investigate their ideas in ways that shift feelings of fear and hopelessness toward constructive hope and action. We will first explore how student-generated photos from their local community can build teacher capacity to identify and understand students’ thinking about climate change and the phenomena they find compelling about the topic. Then we will dig into how to utilize photovoiceas a launching point for relevant climate change instruction.

TAKEAWAYS:
You will takeaway a Google slide deck with specific teaching tools that are how-to guides for facilitating students' individual and collaborative teams, meaning making around the photos they generate, and how to navigate their emotions towards collective actions around local climate change impacts.

SPEAKERS:
Michael Lawson (Teaching Assistant Professor), Imogen Herrick (Assistant Professor of STEM Education: , CA)

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