2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

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Rooms and times subject to change.
8 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Creating a Sustainably Integrated Pedagogy Using STEM, Social Studies, and ELA

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2209



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA 2023_ Creating a Sustainably Integrated Pedagogy.pdf

STRAND: Research to Practice

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According to recent studies, teaching elementary reading, writing, and math in isolation is not the most effective way for students to learn. We will show how it is possible to develop integrated learning opportunities using all of the subjects in the elementary school day-- building strong connections within young students' brains. Such rich and impactful experiences in student learning enhances the likelihood for students to make lasting connections with what they're learning every day. The Framework for K-12 Science in Education in conjunction with the NCSS C3 Framework is our basis for designing lessons and units. Presenters will model and help teachers brainstorm robust, integrated lessons with STEM, ELA, and social studies to improve student understanding in all subject areas as they gather, reason, and communicate connections in problem-solving STEM activities, fiction, informational text, writing, and simulated learning experiences– all capable of supporting each other.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn the connections between NGSS, NCSS, and CCSS and the impact they can have on student learning with mindful integration of these subjects. Using a template to guide their planning, attendees will begin to practice integrating lesson/unit plans based on their own core requirements.

SPEAKERS:
Deborah Draper (Cedar Ridge Elementary School: Cedar Hills, UT), Julie Siebach (Retired Teacher: Cedar Hills, UT)

International STEM Career Role Models: Curated Children’s Books at the Forefront of K-6 STEM Lessons

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2201


STRAND: Research to Practice

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Research indicates that teachers need to address STEM career awareness and connect to students’ lives. Our goal is to highlight STEM careers/role models across the globe through using children’s books to anchor STEM lessons. The books are chosen to cover various peoples/cultures from around the world. Using books to engage students in thinking about how STEM connects to various cultures across the globe can be a powerful learning tool and can lead to important classroom discourse regarding cultural awareness (Yoon, 2022). For example, Tu Youyou’s Discovery: Finding a Cure for Malaria by Songju Ma Daemicke focuses on returning to Chinese herbal medicine to discover treatment for malaria. In the same manner, One Plastic Bag by Miranda Paul, highlights Istaou Ceesay’s true story from Gambia. The main character in this book started a grassroots movement to recycle plastic bags since they were causing pollution and negatively impacting livestock. Participants will be actively engaged!

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will engage in hands-on STEM mini-lessons in small groups. Each participant will explore several picture books highlighting STEM careers and people from across the globe.

SPEAKERS:
Sumreen Asim (Indiana University Southeast: New Albany, IN)

Hooking Key Scientific Concepts for Below-Proficient Readers Using Anchor Texts

Friday, October 27 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2207


STRAND: Research to Practice

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In the first part, participants will gain an understanding of how anchor texts are connected to science and engineering practices -- what students do using student work samples and sample anchor texts. First, we will explore the use of concept loading in scientific complex texts through a discussion, examples, and video. We will look at how scientific texts are organized to communicate key ideas through concept loading using text/visual features and text structures such as direct definition context clues through a group discussion. In groups, teachers will dissect a given text to develop a think-aloud to explicitly teach scientific key ideas and concepts using text/visual features. Next, we will compare informational and science fiction text using a model and T-chart for text organization/structure. We will unpack an NGSS standard so participants understand which key concepts and vocabulary must be presented in the given text through a group summary for key takeaways.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers as change agents provide the cultural tools through the modeling of science and engineering practices using literacy strategies. Through modeling, teachers can engage students to interact with complex informational texts for increased sensemaking.

SPEAKERS:
Leslie Birdon (Richwood High School: Monroe, LA)

Integrating Literacy and Science in Elementary Classrooms with Multiple Literacies in Project-Based Learning (ML-PBL)

Friday, October 27 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


STRAND: Research to Practice

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The main resource that will be shared is a poster that presents an overview of a case study completed as a part of the Multiple Literacies in Project-Based Learning (ML-PBL) Efficacy Study. The information shared will focus on the affordances of carrying the thinking from science to other parts of the school day and of using science-related texts for multiple purposes in literacy instruction. Overall efficacy study results will be shared. The url for finding the posted free ML-PBL OER curriculum resources will be provided, as well as information for learning more about ML-PBL. The case study has been published in a book of case studies, which will be mentioned (is shown in a section of the poster), but not promoted. Texts used to extend Grade 3 units will be available for attendees to review.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will be exposed to free resources and ideas for selecting resources for literacy lessons that allow students to continue to fine-tune and extend the ideas they are developing in science class. Handouts with links to additional resources will be available.

SPEAKERS:
Susan Codere (CREATE for STEM Institute, Michigan State University, Retired)

Do NOT Sit Down and Be Quiet

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2202



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Do NOT Sit Down and Be Quiet!

STRAND: Research to Practice

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Participants will be engaged in multiple strategies that include mandatory engagement and collaboration. Many of the activities also include movement. The strategies can be implemented the week they return in any classroom with any subject area. Activities range from a Tea Party (science/literacy) activity, card sorts, and data collecting.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will leave with a variety of strategies to engage students through collaboration and movement.

SPEAKERS:
Carol Moore (STEM West: CLAREMONT, NC)

Carpe Diem et Tempus: Finding Time to Teach Science Daily Through Integrating ELA Strategies

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2102 A


STRAND: Research to Practice

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Elementary teachers continue to struggle with “fitting it all in” when ELA standards are prioritized at the elementary level. While cross-curricular instruction is one strategy, there is often still a need to focus on the identified ELA competencies. This session will focus on strategies that easily cross over between science and ELA in order to better leverage instructional time. For example, a common strategy called “text to” helps students make connections as they read and make meaning from ideas in the text. By expanding this strategy with science content and investigations, students now add first-hand knowledge of a topic to their connection-making mental process. This strategy incorporates discourse strategies that are known to assist students in sensemaking. Research within the ELA side has supported the idea that the most logical place for instruction around reading and thinking strategies is within the content areas. Additional strategies will be shared and modeled.

TAKEAWAYS:
The session will focus on engaging participants in strategies that can easily cross over and place science at the forefront, and provide authentic topics around which to build both science concepts and ELA competencies, thus seizing the time to do science.

SPEAKERS:
Christine Anne Royce (Shippensburg University: Shippensburg, PA)

Improving Science Literacy with Problem-Based Learning

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2101



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Slides Science Literacy and PBL

STRAND: Research to Practice

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Using research and facts to support decisions is a skill our students need to learn. Problem-based learning allows students to come up with multiple solutions to a problem and then, through the use of research, experimentation, and failure, students learn to scientifically support their thoughts and ideas. Problem-based learning helps students learn science content while also building important 21st century skills and lifelong practices. In a world where content facts are readily available and resources are waiting to me explores, students have the opportunity to see how their learning relates to current careers, as well as the opportunity to share their insights with others. Students get to explore literature while engaging in problem solving and science exploration.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will gain a better understanding of how to improve literacy while incorporating problem-based learning into the required units of study through discussion and brainstorming with peers on the use of Problem-Based practices.

SPEAKERS:
Charlsie Prosser (Education Professor and Chair: Baldwin City, KS), Tara Burnham (Assistant Professor of Education)

Teaching Science with Superheroes: Engage Students with Illustrations from Movies, TV, Comics, and More!

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2104 A


STRAND: Research to Practice

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Student engagement is a vital element for effective science instruction (Heddy & Sinatra, 2013). However, students typically become less engaged in science as they advance in school years (Ofsted, 2015). Superheroes have been a mainstay in popular culture and multimedia for decades. Science teachers can harness this widespread interest to enhance lessons, broaden assessments, and increase student engagement. Participants will examine multiple superhero examples, each with applications to specific NGSS performance expectations. They will also consider research content from science journals and organizations (National Geographic, Scientific American, NASA, NOAA, WHO, etc.) to catalyze further exploration and extensions. In addition to specific activities, teachers will practice analyzing popular culture and research for wider engagement. They will also review important copyright parameters and “fair use” in the classroom, with an emphasis on appropriate implementation.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants in this interactive session will examine a variety of multimedia superhero examples, with a focus on immediate classroom implementation AND legal copyright “fair use.” In addition to specific lessons, teachers will practice analyzing and applying media and research to engage students.

SPEAKERS:
Daniel Bergman (Wichita State University: Wichita, KS)

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