2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

All sessions added to My Agenda prior to this notice have been exported to the mobile app and will be visible in your account when the app launches. Any sessions added now, will also have to be added in the app.
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FILTERS APPLIED:Poster, Research to Practice, Mathematics

 

Rooms and times subject to change.
4 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

The "Foot-to-Hand" Research Project: Is There a Correlation Between Hand and Foot Length?

Friday, October 27 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Poster NSTA Foot-to-hand Handout.pdf

STRAND: STEM Haven

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Is there a correlation between the length of someone’s hand and shoe size? While this may seem like a silly question, we've developed a full research project called the "Foot-to-Hand Ratio." This research project uniquely exposes students to units of measurement, dimensional analysis, and research. Over a period of years, a class of 24 students completed this research project. Students measured the length of one hand, one foot, and their height. Then they calculated their Foot-to-Hand, Height-to-Foot, and Height-to-Hand ratios. Surprisingly, there was a direct correlation between the hand and foot length, and height and hand, or foot, length. In addition, students used statistics to dismiss "outliers" in the data.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will have access to a new, simple research project that incorporates mathematics.

SPEAKERS:
Sharron Jenkins (Georgia Gwinnett College: Lawrenceville, GA)

Using Pan and Digital Balances to Describe and Compare Weight

Friday, October 27 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Different Instruments for Quantifying Qualifying Weight
Weight measurement with pan and digital balances.

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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The poster aims to present student ideas about mathematics and computational thinking (MCT) in the context of weight (elementary) or mass (secondary). Standards K-PS2-1 and 3-PS2-1 emphasize and guide the three-dimensional approach. Participants consider the differences and similarities between a pan and digital balance with a Venn diagram. Students typically think of weight as a quantitative measure. The pan balance can be used to describe the weight of an object both qualitatively and quantitatively. In mathematics education, pan balances quantify the weight of objects with a set of known weights. Weighted plastic of one, five, or ten increments placed on one side of the pan quantitatively measures the ”weight” of the object on the other pan. Educators use “weight” to describe “mass” and refer to heaviness or the amount of stuff an object has at the elementary level. Comparing and contrasting quantities and relationships align with the SEP of using MCT.

TAKEAWAYS:
After comparing the weight of two or more objects with a pan and digital balance, a Venn diagram structures students' thinking about the weight measurement tools. We present students’ ideas about balances and offer strategies to uncover students’ ideas about qualitative and quantitative measurements.

SPEAKERS:
Jaclyn Murray (Mercer University: Macon, GA)

Cereal Box Dominoes in the K-4 Science Classroom

Saturday, October 28 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


Show Details

We believe lifelong learners are developed as a result of a strong early childhood foundation in problem-solving and sensemaking. This session documents a lesson in engendering, math, and problem-solving we developed with cereal box dominoes in our K-4 science class. The lesson included and engaged all students in saving, sorting, and creating a domino path pattern, as well as the community and surrounding city as churches, parents, apartment complexes, friends, and family saved boxes and eagerly anticipated the domino event.

TAKEAWAYS:
Session demonstrates how science is presented to K-4 students to both build a strong science foundation and competency in problem solving.

SPEAKERS:
Susan (Cee Cee) Cohen (Retired Teacher: Madison, WI)

Using a computational model to learn population-level viral transmission through the lens of probability

Saturday, October 28 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

This lesson is part of a multi-day unit designed for middle school students to learn about viral respiratory pandemics. The lesson incorporates a free computation model called Disease Spread, which is provided by Gizmos. The lesson is divided into two 45-minute blocks. In the first block, students are introduced to the concept of probability, explore the relationship between probability of transmission and the time it takes for a virus to spread through a group of people. Students generate hypotheses, brainstorm methods to test their hypotheses, and get familiar with the simulation. During the second block, students first collect data using the computational model. They then analyze data using means and histograms with both digital tools and unplugged activities. Students draw conclusions based on their findings, and discuss the affordances and limitations of the computational model.

TAKEAWAYS:
We demonstrate how to utilize a computational model and integrate mathematics concepts (i.e., probability) to help students engage in and make sense of a science phenomenon with critical connections to society (i.e.,the spread of viruses).

SPEAKERS:
Swarna Mahapatra (Graduate Student: Columbia, MO)

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