2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

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FILTERS APPLIED:9 - 12, Presentation, Research to Practice, Physics

 

Rooms and times subject to change.
7 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Johns Hopkins Wavelengths Lessons: Connecting Secondary Students to Cutting Edge Science

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 C


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

This session will introduce participants to a lesson designed to introduce high school students to cutting-edge research on planetary science. The lesson is designed around the critical aspects of sensemaking: students experience a phenomenon, engage in science and engineering practices, and share ideas to build and/or apply disciplinary core ideas and crosscutting concepts needed to explain how or why the phenomenon occurs. Sensemaking is in the vision of A Framework for K-12 Science Education -- “the doing of science and engineering is highlighted as a strategy that can capture students’ interest in science and motivate their continued study.” (A Framework for K-12 Science Education, pp 42-43). JHU Wavelengths lessons co-designed by NSTA and Johns Hopkins University provide opportunities for all students to engage in science learning that is meaningful to them.

TAKEAWAYS:
The Johns Hopkins Wavelengths lesson introduced in the session provides opportunities for secondary students to learn about cutting-edge planetary science research and figure out science ideas related to earth and space science, and physical science.

SPEAKERS:
Patrice Scinta (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Making Physics Engaging & Accessible for All Students (even those who struggle with math)

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Jay McShann B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

My first years of teaching Physics at Title 1 schools in Memphis were challenging. Many of my students were very behind, especially in math. However, I developed 5 strategies to make learning physics accessible and they completely transformed my classroom. 1. “Building Block” Method The biggest breakthrough in my classroom was breaking long problems down into building blocks. I will show how to do this with a sample forces unit. 2. Pre-manipulated equations I will share an equation sheet that shows all forms of each equation. It is a game-changer for students who struggle with algebra. 3. Setting-Up for Success I will model a consistent way to help students stay organized on different types of problems. 4. Simplifying Motion I will illustrate how to solve motion problems using simpler notation and simpler equations. 5. Simplifying Circuits I will show how to use the “routes method” so students can solve most circuits in a more conceptual way.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will come away from this session with strategies that they can immediately implement in their classrooms to make physics more accessible and engaging, especially for their lower-level learners.

SPEAKERS:
Jack Replinger (FormerTeacher / Founder: , WA)

Brain Based Instruction: Using Cognitive Psychology to Boost Science Learning

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Truman B


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

How much assistance should teachers provide to learners and how should they schedule it? When should teachers mix together different kinds of practice problems? Are mnemonics useful? The pragmatic answers to these questions provided by cognitive science tap the innate strengths of human brain systems and have been shown to improve students' ability to retrieve and apply information. I will synthesize and present data about the effectiveness of a variety of different general learning strategies. I will utilize a variety of fun and engaging demonstrations of cognitive phenomena to help teachers understand and learn how to use these cognitive learning strategies. For example, attendees will try to remember new facts through self-testing or re-studying. I will interpret the results of the cognitive demonstrations, connect the results to existing lab-based and classroom data, and explain the brain-based mechanisms behind the effects.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how to apply multiple practical, flexible, and research-based cognitive strategies, including retrieving information from memory, distributing practice across time, scaffolding, and mixing together different examples, within their own classrooms to improve student learning.

SPEAKERS:
Jonathan Tullis (The University of Arizona: Tucson, AZ)

Investigate and Analyze the Physical & Chemical Processes of Stellar Evolution Using NASA’s JS9 STEM Image Analysis Tools and Supporting Resources

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Julie Lee



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
https://chandra.si.edu/
https://universe-of-learning.org/home
SE RESOURCES Kansas City.pdf

STRAND: Tech Tools

Show Details

Stars form in clouds of gas and dust in star formation regions, and follow sequences that end in their destruction. Plotting their changing physical properties on the H-R diagram shows their evolutionary progress. Plotting light curves on the H-D diagram determines instability regions as stars transition to the next stage. Stellar evolution provides the energy which drives the universe and determines its future. Nucleosynthesis creates the elements which will enrich the next generation of protostars and planets. The resources developed by UoL are a progression from understanding astronomical images to plotting stellar transitions through instability strips on the H-R diagram, to analyzing observational data with the same JS9 tools that scientists use to determine everything from the chemical composition of supernovas to determining whether a stellar core is a white dwarf or a neutron star. The JS9 investigations include links to the original research papers and archived data sets.

TAKEAWAYS:
All our knowledge of stars and galaxies is determined by spectroscopy -- the analysis of radiation emissions, including radio, infrared, optical, ultraviolet, gamma, and X-ray. Knowledge of spectroscopy is essential to understanding the processes producing the individual wavelengths.

SPEAKERS:
Donna Young (NASA/NSO/UoL Program Manager: Laughlin, NV)

Assessing SEPs in a Standards Based Physics Classroom

Saturday, October 28 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Our science department began transitioning to a standards-based grading system during the 2018-2019 school year with all courses using standards-based grading in 2020-2021. We teach the Physics and AP Physics 1 courses and will share our experiences preparing for and implementing standards based grading in both of those courses. Our department uses the science and engineering practices as the standards on which we score student proficiency. Our session will outline our philosophies on grading and reporting, our journey into and through standards based grading, and provide practical resources and tips on how to implement standards based grading in a 3D classroom. We plan on sharing our scaled learning skills on which we assess proficiency as well as our success criteria. We will share examples of assessments along with associated student work. Our session will allow time for small group discussions as well as a Q&A portion.

TAKEAWAYS:
How do you implement SBG in a physics course? In an AP course? How do you weave in the SEPs, DCIs, and CCCs? We’ll answer these questions and more while we share our philosophy, formative and summative assessments, sample student work, tips and tricks to make it work, and what to avoid.

SPEAKERS:
Andy Fitz (Adlai E. Stevenson High School: Lincolnshire, IL), Josh Bozeday (Adlai E. Stevenson High School: Lincolnshire, IL), Kristy Wrona (Adlai E. Stevenson High School: Lincolnshire, IL)

What Astronomers Actually Do

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2505 B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

This is a full tour of an astronomy research project done through NITARP (NASA Infrared Teachers Archive Research Program), which pairs Caltech astronomers with STEM teachers for authentic research using data from various observatories. The project presented here is a search for Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) in IC417 (the “Spider and Fly”) nebula. We’ll share how candidate objects were found, how object lists were generated and downloaded, how objects were identified and confidence values assigned. We’ll share how to make and interpret color-color plots, color-magnitude plots, spectral energy distribution plots and more. Most importantly, we’ll share how the astrophysics of star formation reveals itself in spectral data. And how confounding factors, such as dust in the interstellar medium, also show up in the data and can be compensated for. By attending this presentation, educators will be able to share a truer picture of the work of astronomers with their students.

TAKEAWAYS:
The participants will step through an entire astronomical research project from inception through data gathering, data vetting and processing, results, and publication. This will deepen the participant’s understanding of research and equip them to bring astronomical research to their school.

SPEAKERS:
Donna Kaiser (Stamford High School: Stamford, CT), Vincent Urbanowski (Academy of Information Technology & Engineering: Stamford, CT)

Lab Practicals in AP Physics 1

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2505 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Google Slide Deck

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Goodbye, grading labs and lab reports -- Hello, lab practicals! Come learn how we’ve planned, implemented, and graded lab practical assessments in our SBG AP Physics 1 course. They are quick, individual, hands-on, aligned to science and engineering practices, and appropriate for an AP course.

TAKEAWAYS:
We will share how we’ve developed non-traditional lab assessments related to each unit in our standards-based grading AP Physics 1 curriculum. Presenters will share examples, recommendations, and challenges for teachers to think about as they implement lab practicals.

SPEAKERS:
Kristen One (Adlai E. Stevenson High School: Lincolnshire, IL), Kristy Wrona (Adlai E. Stevenson High School: Lincolnshire, IL)

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