2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

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FILTERS APPLIED:PreK - 5, Hands-On Workshop, Research to Practice, Sensemaking

 

Rooms and times subject to change.
19 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Using the NSTA Sensemaking Tool to Evaluate Lessons for Sensemaking - Elementary

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 E



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Demystifying the Practice of Using Mathematics and Computational
Kansas City Fall 2023 Elementary and Secondary Sessions

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The NSTA Sensemaking Tool (adapted from the research-based NGSS Lesson Screener) is designed to help educators be critical consumers of curricular materials as well as create and/or revise science lessons to reflect the instructional shifts required by new standards (sensemaking). Join us to gain experience using the tool and facilitating criteria-based consensus conversations with colleagues.

TAKEAWAYS:
Recognize the critical aspects of sensemaking in a science lesson.

SPEAKERS:
Emily Mathews (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Holly Hereau (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Kate Soriano (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

3 Steps for ES & MS Students to Rock Graphs

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2202



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Shared resource document

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Data is key to NGSS. Yet many students struggle to make sense of it. Leaving many of us baffled by what our students do with data and/or confused by the claims they make from graphs. What can we do? Leverage classroom-ready strategies based on what research says about how younger students learn from data! Join us to discuss the data skills our young learners need and try strategies to integrate these skills into whatever your curriculum or platforms. We will explore how such strategies foster science learning for all students and increase students' interest in working with data (from Pre-K to 8th). We will discuss how novices and experts interact with data differently and what that means for our teaching. As we explore classroom-ready resources around data, data visualizations, and instructional strategies to enhance our current K-8 science content instruction and increase our toolkits. Let’s set ourselves and our students up for success by building strong foundations!

TAKEAWAYS:
Acquire skills and resources to unpack strategies for K-8 students to use when interpreting science data and visualizations in our existing curriculum for building data skills.

SPEAKERS:
Kristin Hunter-Thomson (Dataspire Education & Evaluation, LLC)

What Could We Have Done About All That Dust?

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2207



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Kansas City 2023 NSTA Conference session_ What could we have done about all that dust_.pdf
NSTA KC 2023_ What could we have done about all that dust_ (2).pdf
Red and Blue Stripes Patterned Senses Graphic Organizer (2).pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

According to recent studies, teaching elementary reading, writing, and math in isolation is not the most effective way for students to learn. We will show how it is possible to develop integrated learning opportunities using all of the subjects as attendees work together to analyze data and primary sources from the 1930's regarding the Dust Bowl in Kansas. Using a jigsaw method, attendees will first be divided into specialties: Horticulturist, Biologist, Geologist, Climatologist, Government employee, Native American, and a monoculture farmer to work together, from their discipline's unique perspective, to investigate how the Dust Bowl could have been avoided. They will analyze soil samples, graphs, charts, weather patterns, etc. and come to conclusions. Each member of the group will then be assigned a new group that includes one member from each discipline to present and share their perspectives with others in order to design a solution for the droughts being experienced in the 21st century.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how to integrate historical problems, primary source analysis, and STEM practices in engaging and meaningful ways to reinforce student learning as they work together to explore and debate possible solutions from multiple perspectives to prevent another Dust Bowl like the 1930's.

SPEAKERS:
Deborah Draper (Cedar Ridge Elementary School: Cedar Hills, UT), Julie Siebach (Retired Teacher: Cedar Hills, UT)

STOM: Animals on the Move

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 G



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Animals on the Move NSTA-KC2023
Presentation with links to resources and videos
Animals on the Move Resource Links
Animals on the Move Slides Presentation

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Animal movement patterns are phenomena that students can make sense of and explain. A variety of animal movement data sources will be shared with participants, along with strategies for assisting students in data organization and interpretation. During the presentation, participants will engage as students exploring data to answer questions about specific animal movements. Since this is an elementary session, there will be connections made to trade books and disciplinary text, as well as connections to math and geography standards with an emphasis on integration of disciplines that will assist students in making sense of problems and phenomena of animal movement. Examples of data sources include: Movebank, eBird, Journey North, Department of Fish and Wildlife, Tagging of Pelagic Predators, etc.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how to access data related to animal movement and migration, along with strategies that enable students to make sense of that data in explaining phenomena.

SPEAKERS:
Elizabeth (Betsy) O'Day (Retired Educator: Kansas City, MO)

Wonder EVERY Day: Creating a Culture of Sensemaking

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2101


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

In this session, teachers will explore the concept of wonder and how it can be applied to teaching and learning. Through activities and discussion, teachers will gain an understanding of the importance of wonder in the classroom. Educators will also learn how to embed wonder into their lessons through creative strategies, such as using hands-on activities, engaging visuals, and technology-based activities, focusing deeply on making space for student sensemaking and exploration. Additionally, teachers will explore how to connect wonder to curricular standards and create lesson templates that promote exploration and discovery. Teachers will also reflect on what they have learned and brainstorm ways to implement a culture of wonder in their classrooms. AND HAVE A GOOD TIME DOIN' IT

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will leave the session understanding how sensemaking is supported through our NGSS standards. They will have time to explore and understand methods that inspire student thinking and wonder.

SPEAKERS:
Jacey Suda (John Thomas School of Discovery Partner School: Nixa, MO), Hannah Buckner (John Thomas School of Discovery Partner School: Nixa, MO)

Supporting Meaningful Sensemaking Before, During, and After Science Investigations

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2201


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The purpose of this session is to engage participants as learners in the process of making sense of a phenomenon through engaging in scientific practices. The modeled lesson provides attendees with a shared learning experience similar to that of a typical science classroom, seeded with instructional strategies designed to support their sensemaking before, during, and after an investigation. Attendees will be introduced to a phenomenon, provided materials to carry out an investigation, given a model scaffold to record their thinking, and a talk tool to support equitable idea sharing and listening. They will reflect on their experience as learners, debriefing sensemaking strategies, and using the four attributes of sensemaking (phenomena, science and engineering practices, student ideas, and science ideas) to reflect on the model lesson and their classrooms.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will walk away with a greater understanding of how key science practices work in tandem to support student sensemaking and will experience tools like model scaffolds, driving question boards, and talk tools designed to support learners in explaining phenomena.

SPEAKERS:
Alex Gerber (Instructional Specialist: University City, MO), Heather Milo (Washington University in St. Louis: St. Louis, MO)

Building Data Literacy One “Block” at a Time

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2202



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Session resource document

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Data literacy is integral to students engaging in real-world science and NGSS practices. However, it can be challenging to design data experiences that help students to develop deep understanding of data. The Building Blocks for Data Literacy (Hunter-Thomson & Schauffler, 2021) offers a developmental approach to the design of data experiences: Get Data, Explore Data, and Infer Meaning From Data. Each realm is further broken down into the functions that students should be encouraged to do with data. Session participants will experience a typical path through the data journey, including the opportunity to see how the decisions that we make as educators can shape what students take away from the data experience. Our focus in this session will be at the elementary grade level, but the Building Blocks are a continuum across the K-12 grade span. This work complements the ADVizE grant project (NSF #2142692), which supports the integration of data skills into preservice STEM Methods courses.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will gain an understanding of the way data literacy can be developed developmentally across the realms of Getting Data, Exploring Data and Inferring Meaning from Data.

SPEAKERS:
Kristin Hunter-Thomson (Dataspire Education & Evaluation, LLC), Michael Jabot (SUNY Fredonia: Fredonia, NY)

Seaworthy STEM in a Box: Naval-relevant K-12 Activities to Support Sensemaking in STEM

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2206


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Seaworthy STEM in a Box activities were developed through collaborative efforts between STEM education specialists at the Naval Surface Warfare Center Carderock Division and master teachers participating in the U.S. Department of Energy’s Albert Einstein Distinguished Education Fellowship Program. Seaworthy STEM endeavors to inspire and prepare the next generation of STEM professionals by supporting teachers’ efforts to engage students – from early childhood through high school – in more hand-on science inquiry and engineering design. Activities are organized around grade bands with Naval-relevant themes and involve simple phenomena that support student sensemaking around key science and engineering concepts. Our workshop will allow teachers to practice several hands-on activities from the Seaworth STEM suite and will provide strategies for classroom integration, including content selection, standards alignment, materials acquisition, and tips for classroom implementation.

TAKEAWAYS:
In this hands-on workshop, teachers will explore several Seaworthy STEM in a Box activities and receive teacher background information on NGSS standards alignment, career connections, and relevant Naval and physical science concepts. Links to classroom-ready lesson materials will also be provided.

SPEAKERS:
Stephanie Klixbull (Penn State University: No City, No State), Tom Jenkins (Greenon Junior/Senior High School: Enon, OH), Melissa Thompson (Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship: No City, No State), Suzy Otto (University of Missouri)

Making Sense of Science with Makerspace for an Inclusive Classroom

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2204


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

It is often thought that a makerspace activity is something that is nice to do with students, but not a necessity. Yet when makerspace activities are integrated into daily instruction, it can open many avenues that promote an inclusive classroom. This workshop will focus on strategies and ways to use makerspace to promote student voice and choice for areas of concept development, empathy-driven problem solving, and assessment. Participants will explore the key elements of makerspace and examine ways to use makerspace challenges to support sense-making. The discussion will also focus on the idea that makerspace activities can nudge all students to consider multiple ways of solving problems, thus enhancing their “out of the box” thinking. As part of this session, participants will explore different strategies in using makerspace to introduce a phenomenon, model a phenomenon, and assess students' understanding on three different dimensions of learning.

TAKEAWAYS:
Explore makerspace challenges and activities as a means to provide student voice and choice in how they make sense of a phenomenon, a solution to a problem, and core ideas while demonstrating their understanding of core ideas as a means of assessment.

SPEAKERS:
Michele Detwiler (Gary Adult High School: Tampa, FL)

Using the SEP’s in a Science Investigation for Exploring Diversity Equity and Inclusion

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2206


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

During this workshop small group work with pill bugs set the stage for exploring the SEP’s through a discovery-based investigation. An anonymous poll will be taken at the beginning of the workshop to identify JEDI (justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion) hurdles teachers are facing. During the investigation, technology and non-technology based methods will be explored. After the investigation, participants will share in a facilitated discussion on modes of dismantling barriers. Review handouts of SEP’s & CCC’s identified and applied during the investigation will compliment elementary level DCI’s. Discussion will drive beyond just the facts of finding an answer to the investigation question, but to take an examination into knowledge of helping illustrate how the SEP’s and CCC’s can serve as an entry point at the elementary level to build science literacy and help move us beyond just facts but deepen our understanding and discovery of the world around us.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers struggle with access and affordability when designing discovery-based investigations. With minimal to no cost, this ready-to-use complete elementary LS investigation will demonstrate ways to increase equity in science sensemaking practices through standards-based hands-on investigations.

SPEAKERS:
Kim Burnett (American University: Washington, DC), Ollie Bogdon (Missouri Western State University: Saint Joseph, MO)

Daily Science Instruction IS Possible Using the Workshop Model

Friday, October 27 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2104 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

No one disputes the need for effective daily science instructions for elementary children, yet, only 20% of K-3 students and 35% of grades 4-6 students have access to daily science instruction, according to Cafarell, et.al. (2017). Elementary teachers are challenged to get in daily meaningful science instruction. There is a need to design science lessons that are powerful in impacting student learning and economize the curriculum time. The purpose of this session is to explore the “Workshop Model” instructional layout as a means to deliver meaningful science experiences. This model of instruction has a “tried-and-true” history in literacy and mathematics. The instructional model segments the time into 3 areas: opening, work session, and closing. The session will use a lesson on Earth’s Systems where students open the unit by observing a phenomenon, then move into stations or work sessions, and use student lead closing so students can formalize their understanding of the phenomenon.

TAKEAWAYS:
The workshop model isn’t just for math and literacy—elementary teachers can use this instructional approach to fit effective, engaging, hands-on science lessons into their daily instructional routine.

SPEAKERS:
Kelly Bodner (Cobb County Schools & GSTA Board of Directors)

Hooked on Earthworms: High-Interest Activities to Drive Sensemaking

Friday, October 27 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

First, participants will learn how to keep a worm safe and comfortable for handling. Then we will examine external structure, function, senses, and talk about how those connect to a worm's life style. We will even use flashlights to peek inside the worm to see their digestive system. Each activity will be tied to elementary NGSS on organisms, systems, environment, structure and function, and life cycles. The activities will come from my picture book, This is a Book to Read with a Worm (winner of the AAAS/Subaru Excellence in Science Books, 2020), but I will not promote the book. I just want to share the activities.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will experience a series of activities that will help them use earthworms as phenomena in elementary science. For each activity, we will discuss how to move from the specifics of worms into sensemaking on more general concepts that the worms illustrate.

SPEAKERS:
Jodi Wheeler-Toppen (Author/ Staff Development: Atlanta, GA)

Engaging Students in Science Education with the 5E Model: Strategies and Impacts

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2104 A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Presentation
Slide deck
Wolf Data
Wolf Questions

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Participants in this workshop will learn to plan and design a 5E unit and engage in an example 5E unit on the Isle Royale wolves. They'll explore the history of the wolf population, generate questions for a driving question board, and participate in hands-on activities that integrate science and engineering practices. Through data collection, analysis, research, and making claims supported by evidence, participants will learn how to effectively integrate the 5E model for inquiry-based instruction into their teaching practice. The workshop will also provide resources and strategies for differentiation and inclusion, making science accessible and engaging for all students.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn to effectively use the 5E model for inquiry-based instruction to engage students in science education. Gain strategies for designing and assessing instruction, and see how the 5E model supports student engagement, understanding, and achievement.

SPEAKERS:
Kara Ball (Academic Officer: , MD)

Demystifying the Practice of Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking (Elementary)

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 C


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking is unfamiliar to many science educators because they didn’t engage in this practice in their own K-12 careers. Join us as we venture together into the unknown (unfamiliar) using grade-appropriate elements of Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking to build pieces of disciplinary core ideas and crosscutting concepts needed to explain an everyday phenomenon elementary students find curious and puzzling. Participants will reflect on what Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking is all about and how this practice relates to the practices of Developing and Using Models and Analyzing and Interpreting Data.

TAKEAWAYS:
Elementary students engage in Using Mathematics and Computational thinking everyday as they describe, make comparisons between, and test predictions about systems in the world.

SPEAKERS:
Kate Soriano (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Experiential Problem-based Learning: Climate Literacy in the Elementary and Middle School Classroom

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2104 A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Integrating Climate Literacy - Gonzaga Climate Center
Presentation from the Gonzaga Climate Center on integrating climate literacy using hands-on activities and local climate impacts.

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Explore one model of integrating climate literacy into the classroom using hands-on climate lessons. In partnership with the Washington State Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) and the legislature-funded ClimeTime program, the Gonzaga Center for Climate, Society, and the Environment has created the Climate Literacy Fellows program. Through this program, the Climate Center hires and trains exceptional Gonzaga undergraduates to deliver high-impact climate literacy activities in elementary and middle school classrooms (grades K-8). The Climate Literacy Fellows help students understand how climate influences them and how they and society influence climate through hands-on, inquiry driven activities that center the NGSS standards and experiential learning. Our presentation would focus on the demonstrating one or more of the climate kits in action and opportunities for improvement, as well as suggestions for implementation in other places.

TAKEAWAYS:
The importance of a hands-on approach to engaging students with the process of science and understanding the broader context that climate change occurs in.

SPEAKERS:
Karli Honebein (Gonzaga Institute for Climate, Water, and the Environment: No City, No State)

Making Sense of STEM in PreK

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Making Sense of STEM in Pre-K
NSTA KC 23

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Pre-K students have brains that are developing quickly and making rapid connections. This session explores sense-making and equitability in PreK, encouraging a love of learning in the young child. At McKissick Academy of Science and Technology, we utilize our Engineering Design Process to engage students in critical thinking, planning, revision, and communication through STEM. Our tools include: Project Lead the Way, Engineering is Elementary, Picture-Perfect STEM, Creative Curriculum, and our own teachers’ Project Based Learning units to further develop their brains. Our school believes in making learning equitable by providing access to STEM education for all our students; not just the upper grades. Join us for a session where you can walk away with some confidence to start your own units that will directly apply to your littles.

TAKEAWAYS:
The way STEM, and the EDP are embedded into Pre-K environments in our school meets the needs of early intervention and provides equitable access to education for children prior to beginning kindergarten.

SPEAKERS:
Angela Spearman (McKissick Academy of Science & Technology: Easley, SC), Brittany Clark (McKissick Academy: Easley, SC), Morgan Stancil (Teacher: Easley, SC)

5-6-7-8: How Dance Class Can Teach Us About Best Practices For Instruction

Saturday, October 28 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2102 A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
PH_5-6-7-8_ How Dance Class Can Teach Us About Best Practices for Instruction.docx
Slides_5-6-7-8_ How Dance Class Can Teach Us About Best Practices for Instruction.pptx

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

In this interactive workshop, through the modality of dance class, participants engage in a inquiry-based, hands-on experience allowing independent and collaborative exploration of new content. Using peer conversations to deepen understanding, and a whole group debrief, participants naturally progress towards acquiring domain-specific terminology, culminating in a design challenge demonstrating application of knowledge. Analytical reflection of the experience, instructional approach, and supports, allows connections to participants’ own educational environments. Modeled after an inclusive framework, the experience demonstrates instructional strategies that support all learners while providing equitable opportunities for access to content. Including elements of differentiation, student choice, and the power of kinesthetic learning, the research-based experience builds knowledge while embracing and reinforcing key pedagogical ideas, reflecting best practices for science instruction.

TAKEAWAYS:
Experience best practices for science instruction including elements like differentiation, student choice, the power of kinesthetic learning, and more, all wrapped up in a research-based instructional model using an inclusive framework approach.

SPEAKERS:
Isaac Stauffer (Great Minds: Washington, DC)

Carpe Diem et Tempus: Finding Time to Teach Science Daily Through Integrating ELA Strategies

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2102 A


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Elementary teachers continue to struggle with “fitting it all in” when ELA standards are prioritized at the elementary level. While cross-curricular instruction is one strategy, there is often still a need to focus on the identified ELA competencies. This session will focus on strategies that easily cross over between science and ELA in order to better leverage instructional time. For example, a common strategy called “text to” helps students make connections as they read and make meaning from ideas in the text. By expanding this strategy with science content and investigations, students now add first-hand knowledge of a topic to their connection-making mental process. This strategy incorporates discourse strategies that are known to assist students in sensemaking. Research within the ELA side has supported the idea that the most logical place for instruction around reading and thinking strategies is within the content areas. Additional strategies will be shared and modeled.

TAKEAWAYS:
The session will focus on engaging participants in strategies that can easily cross over and place science at the forefront, and provide authentic topics around which to build both science concepts and ELA competencies, thus seizing the time to do science.

SPEAKERS:
Christine Anne Royce (Shippensburg University: Shippensburg, PA)

Nature Meditation IRL (In Real Life)

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2201


Show Details

There is a strong need in the post (ish) COVID world, to help overworked, under supported teachers find the mental clarity needed to be the creative, innovative, and caring teachers we need to develop the future STEM minds of the future. As a certified nature therapy guide and long time NSTA presenter, I would love to bring this practice to the NSTA community. Participants will meet in the room and listen to a short overview of nature therapy and its roots in Shinrin-yoku. We will walk outside - encouraged to notice what is moving slowly as we walk through the busy conference. Once we are outside, I will lead in a land acknowledgement and sensory meditation. Participants will be given a chance to share what they noticed in a sharing circle. We will walk to the next locations and engage in more invitations / sharing circles. The invitations will be finalized once I am on site and connect with the land for inspiration.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn about the practice of nature therapy and its roots in the Japanese practice Shinrin-yoku which is widely researched for its health benefits.

SPEAKERS:
Gina Tesoriero (Student / Educator / Researcher / Healer: Saratoga, CA)

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