2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

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FILTERS APPLIED:9 - 12, Hands-On Workshop, Research to Practice, Sensemaking

 

Rooms and times subject to change.
33 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Developing Storylines from a Compelling Anchor

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 D



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Link to the Session Slides

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

N/A

TAKEAWAYS:
Presenting a compelling phenomenon or design challenge requires framing a question and choosing material carefully. Building a storyline requires testing out a launch of a unit to anticipate student questions about it, and first identifying what students will figure out in each lesson of a unit before it occurs.

SPEAKERS:
Bill Penuel (: Boulder, CO)

Is Bigfoot Among Us? Follow the Evidence to Combat Pseudoscience

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Basie Ballroom B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Science is often portrayed as conducted in a simple linear way (i.e., the scientific method). But this is rarely true in actual scientific practice. Instead of a step-by-step series of actions, science is conducted more cyclically, with scientists working back and forth between pursuing exploration and discovery, assessing benefits and outcomes, and developing analysis and feedback. At the core of this process is evidence, against which ideas in science are constantly tested. Evidence is what drives all scientific understanding. By examining environmental DNA (eDNA) collected from areas where recent Bigfoot sightings have occurred, participants can provide students with a logical and rational way scientists can use evidence to dispel the pseudoscience of cryptozoology. Upon completing this activity, attendees can apply their new knowledge to how eDNA is currently used to identify viruses and diseases in wastewater. Resources: https://ncse.ngo/supporting-teachers/classroom-resources

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will explore and appreciate the importance of evidence to the scientific process by taking a deep dive into an NGSS storyline sequence developed to help students understand that science must be substantiated by multiple lines of evidence to be accepted by the scientific community.

SPEAKERS:
Blake Touchet (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA), Ericca Thornhill (Mizzou Academy: Columbia, MO), Lin Andrews (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA)

The Cell Game

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Mary Lou Williams



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QR codes for website and presentations
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The Cell Building Game 2023.pdf
This is the presentation I'll be doing. Documents will be available at the presentation.

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Over the course of the last five years I have developed an engaging resource based card game to teach the cell. I grew disillusioned the projects and activities that we were currently doing as it didn't get to the heart of the parts of the cell. The Cell Game fixed that. In one class students compete to build different organelles that require resource cards. By having more organelles, your cell becomes more complex. The students LOVE the cell game and clamor to play it at lunch after being exposed to it. I'd love to share it with other teachers.

TAKEAWAYS:
Build a cell. Divide. Grow. Get excited about cell microbiology!

SPEAKERS:
Jason Zackowski (Science Curriculum Lead)

Act It Out: Visualizing Cellular Processes

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Big Joe Turner A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Action Potentials Infographic.png
Slides from the Act It Out Presentation

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The more senses we use when learning something, the better we are able to remember it, so in this session teachers will learn how to incorporate movement into their classes. Here are the activities we will do: 1) Modeling an action potential. The graph of an action potential looks a lot like a wave and so to help students remember this, we say the stages of the graph while we make a wave with our bodies (like in a stadium). Then students need to describe what is happening at the cellular level while their bodies are moving. 2) Modeling translation. Participants will be given supplies to take on the role of tRNAs, with anticodons and amino acids, and then show how they enter the ribosome through the A, P and E sites to undergo translation. 3) If time permits, we can also model a signal transduction pathway or DNA replication. 4) The last 15 minutes will be for groups to come up with one way they can incorporate movement and present this to the group.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn how to get your students up and moving as they use their bodies to act out cellular processes.

SPEAKERS:
Ilana Saxe (The Lawrenceville School: Lawrenceville, NJ)

5D Assessment: Using student interest & identity to design meaningful, phenomenon-driven tasks for students

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 E


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Interest and identity are key for supporting meaningful science learning for students (NRC, 2012), yet traditional secondary science assessments do not invite students to bring their sensemaking repertoires and interests to assessment tasks. This session shares a research-driven, “five-dimensional” (5D) process for assessment design that grounds students’ interests and identities as co-equal dimensions to the 3 NGSS dimensions. Participants will use 5D Assessment tools to create more meaningful and equitable assessments that better leverage the assets that students bring and support students as knowers and doers of science. Participants will examine features of meaningful, phenomenon-driven assessments and adapt a community survey tool they can use in classrooms to elicit information about their students’ interests and identities. We will share how they can use this information to guide the development of a “5D” assessment.

TAKEAWAYS:
Educators engage with the 5-D Assessment Project's tools to elicit and use information about students' interests and identities to design meaningful, phenomenon-driven assessment opportunities. Work with examples of meaningful assessment aligned to the elements of the NGSS.

SPEAKERS:
Abraham Lo (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO), Sara Cooper (Contextus)

Why are oysters dying and how can we use chemistry to protect them? Using chemistry to solve ESS problems

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Basie Ballroom A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA23 KC - C.4 Chemical Reactions in our World Webinar September 2023 (1).pdf
Additional materials may be found using the following link: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1AIM1naKisNQng5r-fuUrs-FEUEhlrync?usp=sharing

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

OpenSciEd Chemistry units use a justice-centered storyline approach to help students figure out answers to their questions. The central focus of the Oysters unit is food sovereignty engineering design: how can people reclaim important foods that they’ve lost due to colonization and ecosystem disruption? In this session, participants will experience portions of the unit’s anchor in “student hat” before reviewing the unit as a whole in teacher hat. Participants will see how students develop engineering design solutions using NGSS-aligned chemistry and Earth and space science models and practices including the carbon cycle, acid-base interactions, reversible reactions, and stoichiometry (scale, proportion, & quantity). These lessons include testing pH of various solutions and concentration; using mathematical thinking to inform design solutions; and identifying how humans have impacted the carbon cycle.

TAKEAWAYS:
This unit supports students as they figure out understandings of reversible reactions through explaining changes in ocean chemistry to engineer solutions to prevent oyster die offs. Participants will see how students build these ideas and develop mathematical thinking throughout the unit.

SPEAKERS:
Nicole Vick (Northwestern University), Kerri Wingert (Good Question Research: Boulder, CO)

Selecting Anchoring Phenomena for Equitable 3D Teaching (Part 1 of 2)

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 D



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Session 3 Materials: Selecting Anchoring Phenomena for Equitable 3D Teaching

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

N/A

TAKEAWAYS:
Phenomena is foundational to science and intellectual pursuits in general! Come make sense of the idea and think about how phenomena-based instruction can engage your students in meaningful learning.

SPEAKERS:
Bill Penuel (: Boulder, CO), Tiffany Neill (Curriculum Project Manager: Oklahoma City, OK)

Tools for Supporting Student Understanding of the Nature and Process of Science Through Figuring Out Phenomena

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Basie Ballroom B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Understanding the nature and process of science is critical to scientific literacy. When students engage in the practices of science, they are more likely to integrate science as part of their own identities (Gee, 2007). To do this successfully, students must reflect on what they are doing and why, along with comparing their strategies to those of professional scientists (NRC, 2011). In this session, participants will examine their own conceptions of the nature and process of science, make connections to pedagogical frameworks (NGSS SEPs & CCCs), engage as students to use the Flowchart Mapping tool from the Understanding Science project to trace their approach to figuring out a biological phenomenon about why blue whales are so big, compare their process to that of the scientists investigating the phenomenon, and reflect on how they might use this tool and strategy in their own classrooms with other phenomena or lessons.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how to use the Science Flowchart interactive journaling tool to illuminate the dynamic nature and process of science, and how to apply the tool to any phenomenon or lesson in their classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Lindsey Roy (Science and Digital Learning Coordinator: Lincoln, NE), Betsy Barent (Lincoln Public Schools: No City, No State)

Selecting Anchoring Phenomena for Equitable 3D Teaching (Part 2 of 2)

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 D



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Session 4 Materials: Selecting Anchoring Phenomena for Equitable 3D Teaching

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

N/A

TAKEAWAYS:
Phenomena is foundational to science and intellectual pursuits in general! This session helps you understand powerful qualities of phenomena and how they can support meaningful student investigations in and out of the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Bill Penuel (: Boulder, CO), Tiffany Neill (Curriculum Project Manager: Oklahoma City, OK)

Microwaves: Introducing the OpenSciEd HS Electromagnetic Radiation Unit

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Basie Ballroom A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

OpenSciEd HS Physics units use a storyline approach to help students figure out answers to their questions in a three-dimensional, coherent, and equitable way. In this session, participants will experience that approach firsthand as they engage with the fifth unit’s anchor in ""student hat"", a unit anchored in the use of the microwave and its interactions with wireless devices. Participants will see how students develop and use different models to explore ideas about electromagnetic waves and their interactions with matter. They will also see some of the investigations students plan and carry out using different materials inside the microwave oven to explain energy transfer. Participants will also see how the unit supports students’ sensemaking to explain how different technologies apply these ideas to produce, transmit, and capture signals, and the potential risk associated with their uses.

TAKEAWAYS:
This unit is anchored in the use of the microwave and its interactions with wireless devices. Students figure out and use ideas about waves and their interactions with matter to explain how different technologies apply these ideas to transfer energy and to produce, transmit, and capture signals.

SPEAKERS:
Zoe Buck Bracey (Senior Science Educator and Director of Design for Justice: Colorado Springs, CO), Diego Rojas-Perilla (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO)

Anchoring a Unit with a Crosscutting Concept

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Julie Lee


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Crosscutting Concepts, the links between different science disciplines, can be challenging to use as an anchoring storyline activity. However, it can be one of the best ways to engage students, as they can make personal connections between different domains. Teachers will begin by becoming familiar with the NGSS Appendix G Systems and System Models progression, identifying essential learning by grade. Then, they will investigate how this CCC has been built into a storyline anchor, extending this concept from the initial activity (involving video games) into a different aspect of science–climate modeling. Teachers leave prepared to utilize this storyline in the classroom. Upon completion, students will be able to identify the factors used in climate models and create a model that depicts the flow of energy/matter in a climate system. They will also be able to express the reliability and validity of climate models. Resources: https://ncse.ngo/supporting-teachers/classroom-resources

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will walk away with a better understanding of how to use the Systems and Systems Modeling Crosscutting Concept to help students analyze the precision and reliability limitations of past and present climate models, dispelling major misconceptions about climate science along the way.

SPEAKERS:
Blake Touchet (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA), Michael Lowry (McCallie School: Chattanooga, TN), Lin Andrews (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA)

Be a Genetic Counselor!

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Big Joe Turner A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Genetic Counselor Project Folder
This Google Drive folder has all of the materials for this project, including: the PDFs of the open access primary literature articles, teacher launch pad/key, student directions, sample presentation, the slides from the talk, an explanation of statistics and the project rubric. Please make sure to provide attribution to ilana saxe of The Lawrenceville School, thanks!

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

While not always the case, the experiences that students have had in middle school with genetics can be limited to plug and chug Punnett squares investigating traits in aliens, SpongeBob, and dragons. In an effort to help students see how patterns of inheritance and gene expression can be more nuanced than that and to connect to a real world example, I created a Genetic Counselor project for the 9th graders at The Lawrenceville School (Lawrenceville, NJ). In this session, participants will have the opportunity to work through aspects of the project, specifically creating the pedigree and working with primary literature and analyzing data. This project is great because it includes representation of people of different backgrounds and identities, is based in the real world, introduces students to a career path, and teaches about primary literature. Please see the project launch pad here: https://tinyurl.com/GCPNSTA --Thanks!

TAKEAWAYS:
Work through the genetic counselor project from a patient background, solving a pedigree, learning how to use NCBI, and interpreting primary literature. You will take home the student directions, exemplar projects, list of relevant primary literature articles, and teacher key.

SPEAKERS:
Ilana Saxe (The Lawrenceville School: Lawrenceville, NJ)

Organizing Classroom Talk to Hear All Students’ Ideas: Equity-focused 3D Formative Assessment Through Talk

Friday, October 27 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 D



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Session 5: Organizing Classroom Talk to Hear All Students’ Ideas: Equity-focused

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

N/A

TAKEAWAYS:
The goal of this session is to support teachers in understanding how best to meet the needs of all learners by starting from where students are at and drawing on their intuitive ideas and real world experiences to inform instruction. All strategies are framed as equitable 3-D formative assessment.

SPEAKERS:
Kelsie Fowler (University of Washington: Seattle, WA), Deb Morrison (University of Washington: No City, No State)

Equitable Discussions of Nature-Culture Relationships: OpenSciEd Biology

Friday, October 27 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 F



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Lesson 2 Reading
short framework_Nature_Culture_Relations_rev101321.pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

OpenSciEd Biology Units incorporate frameworks such as 5 Dimensions of Reasoning About Complex Socio-Ecological Systems developed by Learning in Places to support multiple Ways of Knowing and interacting with phenomena. These frameworks bring conversations about power and historicity into the classroom and help students consider multiple points of view when making decisions involving science. The Nature-Culture Relations framework helps students and educators identify the positionality of interest holders to explain different perspectives. Learn how these frameworks are incorporated into biology units.

TAKEAWAYS:
Recognize your own positionality in nature-culture relations and think about how to bring this framework to your students.

SPEAKERS:
Sara Krauskopf (University of Colorado-Boulder), DeAnna Lee Rivers (University of Colorado Boulder: , CA)

Designing for Justice with Attention to Social and Emotional Learning in OpenSciEd HS Physics

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Basie Ballroom A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Justice in P3 NSTA KC 2023- uploaded to NSTA.pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

"Designing for justice means centering inquiry on phenomena that cross the artificial boundary between human and natural systems. The result is instruction that not only teaches students to understand the natural world, but broadens their perspectives on how humans fit into natural systems, what constitutes science, and what they can accomplish using science. In high school, some of the design problems that students are noticing in the world may feel overwhelming, but breaking them down using the ideas and practices of science and providing social emotional supports can help students find hope and resilience. For example in OpenSciEd High School Physics, students ask: What can we do to make driving safer for everyone? Consider how instruction can support students in making positive changes in their communities while attending to students social and emotional needs. "

TAKEAWAYS:
In OpenSciEd HS Physics, students use science ideas and practices to make sense of design problems that emerge from complex systems at the nature-human divide with attention to students’ social and emotional needs.

SPEAKERS:
Whitney Mills (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO), Laura Zeller (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO)

All in the Family: The Story of Human Evolution

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Jay McShann A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Although there is no shortage of potential phenomena for teaching about the process of evolution, using human evolution is a sure way to make the topic relevant and engaging for all students. It is also an excellent way to address some of the most common student misconceptions surrounding the subject, such as “humans evolved from monkeys,” “if humans evolved from apes, why are there still apes?” and “humans are the pinnacle of the tree of life and therefore no longer evolving like other organisms.” By examining a wide range of evidence, including different potential variations of hominid skulls (physical replicas, cards, or 3D digital models), geographic data, artifacts, and climate trends, students will be able to piece together a model of hominid phylogeny and learn about the changes in anatomy, behavior, and distribution that led to our unique human features. Resources: https://ncse.ngo/supporting-teachers/classroom-resources

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will explore a range of paleoanthropology evidence to confidently guide students through one of the most engaging evolutionary phenomena – human evolution. Learn about extinct hominid groups and how they are connected to human origins through features, behaviors, and relationships.

SPEAKERS:
Blake Touchet (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA), Lin Andrews (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA)

Whey Protein can be Legen'dairy' in the Classroom

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Big Joe Turner A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

I will be presenting a short storyline I created. It incorporates the phenomena that whey protein comes from cows. Whey protein is a "buzz" item lately with the workout craze, workout supplements, etc. Throughout the storyline, students will make connections with proteins, dairy (cows), other macromolecules, and homeostasis. Students will learn how to make cheese and that the by-product is whey protein. They will test various workout supplements and health foods for macromolecules. They will learn about homeostasis: positive and negative feedback loops through working out (heart rate and breathing rates). Lastly, they will complete a project where they have to figure out which proteins are best for the human body and then create a product and it's packaging (i.e. protein bar, shake, drink, etc). Teachers will get to experience some of the labs and receive all of the paper resources to take back and implement the storyline or parts of the storyline in their classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
If you have never used storylines, this is a great short one you can try in your class. You will leave this session with beneficial resources you can take back and use in your Biology classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Erin Snelling (Hallsville High School: Hallsville, MO)

How to Tend to 3-D Student Work

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Use our new Tending to Student Work Workbook to analyze student work and see how student work can be used to inform instruction, revise feedback and scoring guides, and inform revisions to assessment tasks. Together we will develop an understanding of what it means to tend to student work in caring ways by figuring out what we need to see in student work and how to see student work through an asset-based lens seeking all facets of student thinking. We will work together to find value in student’s non-target thinking and leverage this thinking. Teachers from Washington’s S.A.G.E. project will share their experiences of tending to student work and the impact it has had on their teaching, learning, and assessment. The session will be interactive.

TAKEAWAYS:
Recognizing the assets students bring to an assessment task is critical for understanding how to move their thinking forward. Leave with tools you can use in your classroom to tend to student work in caring ways that lead to stronger relationships.

SPEAKERS:
Calvin Atkins (Bellingham High School: Bellingham, WA), Colleen LaMotte (Middle School Science Teacher: Shorline, WA), Jenna Mobley (: White Salmon, WA)

Anchored Inquiry Learning: Designing Meaningful Instruction to Make Sense of Authentic Phenomena

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 F


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The Framework for K-12 Science Education and NGSS calls for 3-D learning grounded in authentic phenomena and problems to ensure relevant learning for all students. Instructional materials design helps achieve these synergistic goals and create meaningful classroom sensemaking and learning. The BSCS Anchored Inquiry Learning (AIL) instructional model succeeds the 5Es and utilizes authentic phenomena/problems to anchor multiple cycles of inquiry and sensemaking, culminating with student explanations/design solutions. AIL employs science education research emphasizing coherence from students’ perspective. In this session, participants will: 1) consider how AIL integrates elements of the 5E instructional model, NextGen Science storylines, and problem-based learning instructional models; 2) experience a sample lesson to deepen their understanding of the approach, and 3) consider their own education contexts and how they can apply AIL to design meaningful learning experiences for their students.

TAKEAWAYS:
The research-based BSCS Anchored Inquiry Learning instructional model succeeds the 5Es and leverages authentic phenomena/problems to anchor cycles of inquiry and sensemaking. This approach provides instructional coherence from students’ perspective, equitable access, and motivation for ALL learners.

SPEAKERS:
Nancy Hopkins-Evans (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO), Cynthia Gay (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO)

Making the most of the first week of school: transforming expectations to establish new norms

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 D



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Session 8 Materials: Making the most of the first week of school: transforming e

Show Details

N/A

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn tools to create a culture-setting first unit that energizes students’ engagement in deep learning through a focus on equity. Student-created identity maps, discussion circles focused on science and justice, and using student science outside of the classroom are three such tools.

SPEAKERS:
April Luehmann (University of Rochester: Rochester, NY), James Kostka (New Visions Charter High Schools for Advanced Math & Science II: No City, No State), Hannah Cooke (Research Assistant: , CT), Katrina Robinson (Chemistry Teacher), Ellen Ellison (Science Teacher: Naples, NY)

Incorporating Wet Labs and Writing to Assess Higher Order Thinking of Chemistry Concepts

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Basie Ballroom C


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

This session will provide two example wet lab assessments and information to design one for the general and college/AP chemistry classroom. Both labs were our summative assessment for our molecular structures unit (topics: polarity, intermolecular forces, Lewis structures) and our measuring matter unit (topics: density, metric units, relationship between mass, volume, and temperature). For the molecular structure unit assessment, students determined the polarity of acetone, water, ethanol, and vegetable oil by testing solubility, evaporation rate, surface tension, and drawing Lewis structures. Students wrote a CER to classify each compound as polar or nonpolar. For our measuring matter lab assessment, students had an unknown metal or liquid and had to calculate density and classify the unknown substance and wrote a short CER. Grading can be traditional or SRG.

TAKEAWAYS:
There are numerous ways to assess besides traditional paper and pencil tests in chemistry. This session will focus on using labs and writing CERs based on lab data as an assessment for concepts.

SPEAKERS:
Kelsey Mescher (Battle High School: Columbia, MO), Stephanie Coyle (Jefferson Middle School: Columbia, MO)

What Role Does Feedback And Grading Play In Equitable 3-D Science Classrooms?

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Come experience ways to appraise student work transparently that supports and encourages students wanting to continue the sensemaking process as opposed to thinking an assessment is the end of the learning process. We will begin by looking at multiple pieces of student assessment work, looking for the facets of understanding they present in their work. We will consider different methods of providing feedback and the impact on sensemaking and learning these different methods result in. We will look at different tools that have been created over the last five years to support students actively participating in the appraisal process. Participants will use the experience to begin thinking about the shifts in their appraisal system they would like to try with their students. Teachers from Washington’s S.A.G.E. project will share their experiences of reimagining the purpose of feedback and grading student work, and the impact it has had on their teaching, learning, and assessment.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will engage with authentic student work and consider different methods of providing feedback that is equitable and supports students wanting to share where they are in their sensemaking. Participants will leave with some ‘tools’ they can use in their classroom to provide caring collaboration.

SPEAKERS:
Jenna Mobley (: White Salmon, WA), Colleen LaMotte (Middle School Science Teacher: Shorline, WA), Calvin Atkins (Bellingham High School: Bellingham, WA)

Using Societal Challenges as Phenomena in 3-D Units to Develop Student Agency

Saturday, October 28 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 F


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The Framework for K-12 Science Education and NGSS calls for learning that is grounded in real world phenomena and problems to ensure that science learning is relevant to all students. The BSCS Anchored Inquiry Learning (AIL) instructional model succeeds the 5Es and utilizes complex and culturally relevant societal challenges to anchor multiple cycles of inquiry and sensemaking, culminating with student explanations/design solutions. AIL employs science education research emphasizing coherence from students’ perspective. In this session, participants will: 1) consider their own ideas about teaching complex societal challenges, 2) experience 3-D learning and sensemaking strategies and consider the science concepts of a societal challenge (e.g., antibiotic resistance, heart disease, food sustainability, anthropogenic changes to biodiversity), and 3) consider how using societal issues as anchoring phenomena and problems can motivate students and develop agency in addressing complex issues.

TAKEAWAYS:
The research-based BSCS Anchored Inquiry Learning instructional model succeeds the 5Es and leverages complex societal issues as anchoring phenomena/problems, culminating tasks, and performance assessments in 3-D units of instruction to motivate students and develop agency in addressing these issues.

SPEAKERS:
Nancy Hopkins-Evans (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO), Cynthia Gay (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO)

Meeting the Challenges of Math & Computation with OpenSciEd HS

Saturday, October 28 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 H



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA Kansas City Presentation Math Progression Doc.pdf
Supporting mathematics progressions in OpenSciEd HS - NSTA 2023 Kansas City.pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The HS-level NGSS practices of Analyzing Data (SEP 4) and Using Mathematical and Computational thinking (SEP 5) present a quandary: most HS-level curricula separate math into a rote set of instructional materials like the “stoichiometry unit” or the “forces calculations.” We illustrate a different approach, using OpenSciEd Biology, Chemistry, and Physics units to show how to meet the 3D vision of NGSS and not artificially separating content from mathematical modeling or calculations. By leveraging mathematical thinking contextually and just-in-time, students engage with these practices as sensemaking tools, deepening student understanding of the science and fluency in employing math in novel ways. We explore how complex engagement with these practices is supported in high school courses and discuss how to meet the demands of mathematical thinking in various contexts.

TAKEAWAYS:
Leveraging data analysis and mathematical thinking in the context of meaningful phenomena and problems like food sovereignty, rather than frontloading rote math “skills,” helps students engage with these practices as sensemaking tools, deepening student understanding of both science and math.

SPEAKERS:
Wayne Wright (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Nicole Vick (Northwestern University), Michael Novak (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL)

Supporting All Students Make Sense of Phenomena By Building All of Their Intellectual Resources

Saturday, October 28 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 D


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The Framework and NGSS vision calls for creating opportunities for ALL students to meaningfully engage in sensemaking and learning in science. A culturally responsive approach to instruction highlights the range of intellectual resources that students bring to learning situations based on their cultural histories. Intellectual resources such as student language, perspective, gestures, and prior knowledge are classroom assets. Through a series of concrete accounts of learning situations, this session will create opportunities for participants to work with others to ‘learn to see’ students’ sense-making resources—and connect these pedagogical strategies to their own classroom practice. We frame this approach through an equity and justice framework for culturally responsive instruction centered in the NRC Framework for K-12 Science Education, which posits that science learning should be rooted in students’ ways of being and ways of knowing.

TAKEAWAYS:
Culturally responsive education supports student sensemaking and learning in science. Inclusive science strategies help teachers learn to see students’ diverse sensemaking resources. These methods help us create and adapt curriculum that is equitable and centered on justice.

SPEAKERS:
Philip Bell (University of Washington: Seattle, WA)

Co-design as a strategy for developing high quality instructional materials that support coherence from the students’ perspective in OpenSciEd High School Physics

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 H


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Over the past decade, researchers and practitioners have been calling for more attention to coherence from the student perspective as a key part of curriculum design. This type of coherence arises when students see what they do in the science classroom as productive for addressing meaningful questions and problems. A curriculum that is coherent from the student perspective provides opportunities for all students to contribute to class sensemaking. We will present co-design strategies used by OpenSciEd teams to develop high quality, NGSS-aligned instructional materials that are coherent from the student perspective. Participants will engage in a student hat experience to focus on how that lens can support student coherence in materials and instruction. Participants will explore a variety of co-design strategies for building coherence in developing and implementing instructional materials, with an emphasis on coherence from the student perspective through the use of student hat.

TAKEAWAYS:
When designing and revising NGSS-aligned high-quality instructional materials, co-design in student-hat is a powerful tool for weaving together coherence from the teacher’s perspective within science content, and from students’ perspective.

SPEAKERS:
Laura Zeller (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO), Diego Rojas-Perilla (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO)

Energizing Sensemaking with LOL Energy Models

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 1501 B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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The presentation will include background information detailing how the presenters traditionally taught energy concepts in their physical science, chemistry, and physics classrooms and then gained familiarity with LOL diagrams and implemented this tool in their own classrooms. The presenters will outline why a shift in the instructional approach was needed and how use of this tool can help students to better understand the abstract concept of energy outlined in the evidence statements for NGSS HS-PS3. We will explore how LOL diagrams enhance students’ sensemaking regarding energy, create models of energy flows in systems, and translate conceptual models into computational ones. This approach allows greater integration of the NGSS’s three dimensions as students and participants work to explicitly define systems, leading to greater transparency in students’ thought processes. Participants will engage in discussion with other examples and then work to apply these concepts to their own work.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how student sensemaking can be supported using LOL diagrams to provide a scaffold for creating a conceptual and computational model of energy flow in a system and collaborate in applying these concepts to their own disciplines.

SPEAKERS:
Sarah Evans (Olathe South High School: Olathe, KS), Matt Richard (Teacher: Olathe, KS)

Hands-on Titrations Anywhere: Teaching Inquiry and Scientific Practices with Paper Microfluidics

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2502 B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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Hands-on lab experiments are crucial for students to develop proficiency with the science and engineering practices in the Next Generation Science Standards, but traditional labs often require hazardous materials, expensive equipment, long lab times, and dedicated facilities, leaving them out of reach for many schools. Paper microfluidics provides a safe, low-cost, and easy-to-use platform to do hands-on chemistry experiments without specialized equipment or lab spaces. MICRO Project experiments use paper microfluidics to teach inquiry-based chemistry labs. Each MICRO lab is designed to engage students in science and engineering practices and includes instructor notes, customizable pre- and post-lab questions, student procedures, and background on a relevant issue of equity and justice. These labs have been used by thousands of students at universities, community colleges, and middle and high schools. Workshop attendees will perform a MICRO titration lab.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how to integrate authentic scientific practices into safe, hands-on, low-cost lab experiments.

SPEAKERS:
Rachel Roller (PhD Candidate: Mishawaka, IN)

Adapting Open Education Resources (OER) Instructional Materials to Connect to Local Phenomena and Priorities

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 D



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Session 12 Materials: Adapting Open Education Resources (OER) Instructional Mate

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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N/A

TAKEAWAYS:
Leave with practical strategies and resources to adapt OER materials effectively, making science education more culturally relevant, engaging, and impactful for their students.

SPEAKERS:
Bill Penuel (: Boulder, CO), Lindsey Mohan (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO), Tiffany Neill (Curriculum Project Manager: Oklahoma City, OK)

Nature Meditation IRL (In Real Life)

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2201


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There is a strong need in the post (ish) COVID world, to help overworked, under supported teachers find the mental clarity needed to be the creative, innovative, and caring teachers we need to develop the future STEM minds of the future. As a certified nature therapy guide and long time NSTA presenter, I would love to bring this practice to the NSTA community. Participants will meet in the room and listen to a short overview of nature therapy and its roots in Shinrin-yoku. We will walk outside - encouraged to notice what is moving slowly as we walk through the busy conference. Once we are outside, I will lead in a land acknowledgement and sensory meditation. Participants will be given a chance to share what they noticed in a sharing circle. We will walk to the next locations and engage in more invitations / sharing circles. The invitations will be finalized once I am on site and connect with the land for inspiration.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn about the practice of nature therapy and its roots in the Japanese practice Shinrin-yoku which is widely researched for its health benefits.

SPEAKERS:
Gina Tesoriero (Student / Educator / Researcher / Healer: Saratoga, CA)

Demystifying the Practice of Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking (Secondary)

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 C


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking is unfamiliar to many science educators because they didn’t engage in this practice in their own K-12 careers. Join us as we venture together into the unknown (unfamiliar) using grade-appropriate elements of Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking to build pieces of disciplinary core ideas and crosscutting concepts needed to explain a phenomenon (in part) and begin designing a solution to a problem. Participants will reflect on what Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking is all about and how this practice relates to the practices of Developing and Using Models and Analyzing and Interpreting Data.

TAKEAWAYS:
Engaging students in the practice of Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking can create and foster wider interests in STEM fields.

SPEAKERS:
Kate Soriano (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

"When am I Going to Use This?" Resources That You Can Use to Make Topics That Students See as Irrelevant More Meaningful for Students

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2206


STRAND: Tech Tools

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The session will give teachers an opportunity to participate in the same sort of rich and meaningful learning experiences that are called for by the NGSS. This session, as a result, will include approximately forty minutes of audience participation in student hat. Teachers will leave with high-quality instructional materials that they can use in their own classrooms. The agenda for this session is: • A discussion of some topics that are challenging to teach because many students see them as irrelevant and why students think this way about them (10 mins). • An opportunity for participants to experience an example of how a meaningful and authentic phenomenon can drive a learning experience (40 mins) • An overview of a tech tool to help teachers create these types of learning experiences (5 mins) • Questions and suggestions for learning more (5 mins)

TAKEAWAYS:
Meaningful phenomena and authentic problems can make topics not only more meaningful for students, but can also make instruction more rigorous and equitable.

SPEAKERS:
Todd Hutner (The University of Alabama: Austin, TX)

STEAM-Powered Stoichiometry: Where Art and Chemistry Converge

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2502 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA 2023 STEAM STOICHIOMETRY PROJECT.docx
Unit worksheet for STEAM Stoichiometry Project
NSTA 2023 STEAM WORKSHOP PPT.pptx
STEAM Stoichiometry Workshop Powerpoint File
STEaM Stoichiometry Image

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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Stoichiometry is a topic that many teacher find difficult to teach and for many students, difficult to learn. In this project-based workshop, students will learn stoichiometry principles from the perspective of making paint. Paints are made up of three components: a pigment, a binder, and a thinner. In the water-based paint created in this module, the binder is calcium carbonate, an insoluble precipitate made from the double-displacement reaction between aqueous solutions of calcium chloride and sodium carbonate. When mixed in stoichiometric amounts, an insoluble precipitate, calcium carbonate, forms. Students use stoichiometry to quantify the correct amounts of aqueous reactants to make a desired amount of binder, then mix their own paint using pigment and water as a thinner. The project culminates in a class quilt made up of students' individually painted tiles.

TAKEAWAYS:
Stoichiometry does not have to be an anxiety-producing, tear-jerking unit. When taught in chewable chunks, students gain an appreciation for its importance in daily life. In this workshop, students learn concepts that are tied to an end-product art project.

SPEAKERS:
Caroline Gochoco-Tsuyuki (Archbishop Riordan High School: San Francisco, CA)

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