2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

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FILTERS APPLIED:STEM Share-a-Thon, STEM Haven | STEM, Chemistry

 

Rooms and times subject to change.
8 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Evidence-Based Teaching in Chemistry

Saturday, October 28 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2208


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Research has proved that active learning is more effective than traditional lectures. However, active learning requires additional support in addition to the textbooks. For example, POGIL needs workbooks to assist students' learning. Flipped classroom needs clickers to collect students' responses. This talk will discuss what kind of support is required by active learning, specifically for flipped classroom and Just-in-time learning from a practice standpoint and a technology standpoint. After the presentation, the attendees will be able to design their own material for their classroom teaching. After the presentation, the attendees will have skills to design their own material for their classroom teaching. For example, the attendee can prepare teaching material before class, during class, and after class for flipped classroom and Just-in-time learning. The attendees will also learn how to choose technologies to assist their implementation of their chosen teaching pedagogy.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn a new tool to improve the teaching/learning efficiency of the classroom teacher AND reduce the workload of the teacher.

SPEAKERS:
Jack Huang (associate professor: Jacksonville, FL)

STEAM-Powered Stoichiometry: Where Art and Chemistry Converge

Saturday, October 28 • 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Share-a-thon Area


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Stoichiometry is a topic in foundational chemistry that is often difficult for students to grasp. In this lesson, students learn about stoichiometry from the perspective of making paint. The lesson plan brings together many chemistry topics that are often taught in siloed chapters: types of chemical reactions, balanced chemical equations, net ionic equations, limiting reactants, molarity, and solution stoichiometry. This lesson brings these topics together and students make sense of how the different topics are conceptually bound. The art component of painting a personal tile gives each student the opportunity for self-expression and the inclusion of each tile into a class quilt makes for a unique perspective of the collective.

TAKEAWAYS:
Student engagement in learning and understanding a difficult concept like stoichiometry is buoyed by inclusion of an art component and a descriptive narrative that allows for open expression of a student's interests or culture.

SPEAKERS:
Caroline Gochoco-Tsuyuki (Archbishop Riordan High School: San Francisco, CA)

In-Class or Home School Integrated Math & Science Chemistry Research Projects

Saturday, October 28 • 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Share-a-thon Area



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
0-Workshop NSTA VitC Titration Handout GraphPaper.pdf
Workshop Vitamin C Lab - Graph Paper
0-Workshop NSTA VitC Titration Handout Instructions.pdf
1-NSTA Vit C Titration Handout.pdf
2-NSTA Vit C Clock Handout.pdf
Vitamin C Lab
3-NSTA Red Cabbage Handout.pdf
4-NSTA Foot to Hand.pdf
5-NSTA Milk Lab Handout.pdf

Show Details

This presentation revolves around the development of two distinctive research projects: Vitamin C Project and the Carbon Dioxide Project. In the Vitamin C project, participants extract juice from fruits and determine the vitamin C content using common household chemicals. In the Carbon Dioxide Project, participants quantitatively determine the amount of carbon dioxide and water produced when mixing specified amounts of baking soda and vinegar. The capture of carbon dioxide and water in clear balloons is an engaging way to apply basic mathematics to a chemical reaction. Embracing an integrative approach to teaching science and mathematics helps bridge the gap between knowledge learned and knowledge applied. This presentation will provide educators with innovative, standards-aligned projects that foster student interest in science and mathematics. For 3rd - 6th graders, these research projects can be delivered through storybooks!

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will gain full activity descriptions and handouts for at least three projects and learn how to integrate math skills into research projects that promote critical thinking and discovery (targeting 3rd - 12th grade).

SPEAKERS:
Sharron Jenkins (Georgia Gwinnett College: Lawrenceville, GA)

Online Preliminary Course Could Increase Engagement and Retention for Incoming General Biology and Anatomy Undergraduate Students

Saturday, October 28 • 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Share-a-thon Area


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Throughout teaching Anatomy and Physiology (A&P) and General Biology, students often face academic challenges surrounding these two foundational courses. One intended method to overcome these challenges is to implement a preliminary online course that students can complete before starting the academic year. Attendees will discuss how to design their own preliminary online course through an interactive workshop (in electronic and hard-copy formats) with group-based activities (e.g., discussions and demos) for any college-level biology course. We will also demonstrate various methods and assessments (e.g., recorded videos, quizzes, virtual escape rooms) best suited for students who choose to take the prep course, through our findings at our current college. A sample of our current preliminary online courses can be found via this link: https://sites.google.com/springfieldcollege.edu/bioprepcoursessc/general-biology-online-course

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn about our experience using a preliminary online course for undergraduates. Attendees will then learn how to design their own prep courses focusing on what students require in general biology and anatomy.

SPEAKERS:
Gemma Bartha (Instructor: Springfield, MA)

Hands-On Titrations Anywhere: Teaching Inquiry and Scientific Practices with Paper Microfluidics

Saturday, October 28 • 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Share-a-thon Area


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Hands-on lab experiments are crucial for students to develop proficiency with the science and engineering practices in the Next Generation Science Standards, but traditional labs often require hazardous materials, expensive equipment, long lab times, and dedicated facilities, leaving them out of reach for many schools. Paper microfluidics provides a safe, low-cost, and easy-to-use platform to do hands-on chemistry experiments without specialized equipment or lab spaces. MICRO Project experiments use paper microfluidics to teach inquiry-based chemistry labs. Each MICRO lab is designed to engage students in science and engineering practices and includes instructor notes, customizable pre- and post-lab questions, student procedures, and background on a relevant issue of equity and justice. These labs have been used by thousands of students at universities, community colleges, and middle and high schools. Participants at the Share-a-Thon will perform a MICRO titration lab.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how to integrate authentic scientific practices into safe, hands-on, low-cost lab experiments.

SPEAKERS:
Rachel Roller (PhD Candidate: Mishawaka, IN)

Cutting Through the Chemistry of CRISPR Cas-9.

Saturday, October 28 • 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Share-a-thon Area


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The unique nature of this presentation leverages the extensive knowledge and experience of both a chemistry and a biology educator (who is also a research scientist) to show how teachers can use biotechnologies, such as DNA Fingerprinting and CRISPR Cas-9, to motivate student exploration while expanding their chemistry knowledge and inspiring them to pursue research. This topic is particularly important because CRISPR Cas-9 is at the forefront of medical breakthroughs such as CAR-T cell cancer treatments and gene therapy. Unfortunately, this topic has not yet been used to its full potential in the classroom. This presentation will raise awareness among teachers of how to explain and utilize biotechnologies in various ways. Specifically, this session will show how to use chemistry to explain CRISPR Cas-9 while emphasizing the six elements of life, functional groups, and macromolecules (using hands-on molecular models) to leverage sense making to explain these complex processes.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how to excite students to learn and apply the chemistry necessary to understand the latest breakthroughs in biotechnology such as DNA Fingerprinting and CRISPR Cas-9. This presentation will showcase the crosscutting concept of systems and system models.

SPEAKERS:
Susan Allison (Dawson Education Service Cooperative: Arkadelphia, AR), Patrycja Krakowiak (Biology Instructor: Hot Springs, AR)

Google Sites for the Advanced Science Lab

Saturday, October 28 • 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Share-a-thon Area



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Resources for Building Your Google Site

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Attendees will walk through the process of creating a Google Site specific to their classroom. They will learn how to create a master template to share with their students and how to help their students get started with the Google Site. They will also learn how to support their students as the Google Site is used to submit projects, portfolios, or lab notebooks. Attendees will learn how to insert pictures, files, and videos into the Google Site to create a more interactive resource for students. Attendees will begin to create their own template in the session with the goal of having a template ready to use in their classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
Google Sites streamlines the grading process for lab notebooks and projects.

SPEAKERS:
Brodie Solomon (Physics Teacher: Ft Worth, TX), Katie Labadie (Science Department Chair: Fort Worth, TX)

Physically Active Modeling For Comparing States of Matter

Saturday, October 28 • 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Share-a-thon Area



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Ideal Gas Law Students as Particles Activity Handout.docx
Physically Active Modeling Ideal Gas Laws Lesson Plan.docx
Physically Active Modeling States of Matter (1).pptx
Physically Active Modeling States of Matter Blank Handout NSTA 2023 .docx
Physically Active Modeling States of Matter Slides Handout NSTA 2023 KC.docx
QR Code Physically Active Modeling For States Of Matter NSTA 2023.png

Show Details

This activity has students/participants act as particles. To start, participants are given baseline information about how attractive forces between particles can vary from very strong to negligible, & that particles are always in motion. To model very strong forces participants link arms at the elbow, for moderately strong forces they hold hands, & for weak/negligible forces they can only hold each other’s pinky fingers. Participants start far apart & move very slowly to model a very cold temperature. At this speed, all of the participants are able to form an organized structure (solid). With each iteration the participants move faster. This results in the weak force group not being able to form structure (gas), the moderate force group being clumped together but not organized (liquid), & the strong force group still being able to form an organized structure (solid). Activity will then be modified to explain WHY gas law variables have the relationships they do (P,V,T, n).

TAKEAWAYS:
Students will not only know the properties of solids, liquids, and gasses, but will also be able to give in-depth explanations as to WHY the properties are different by behaving as the particles at different temperatures and with different attractive forces.

SPEAKERS:
Clark Ellis (The Kinkaid School)

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