2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

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Rooms and times subject to change.
33 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

SC-2: Designing and Using Three-Dimensional Assessment Tasks to Support NGSS Instruction

Wednesday, October 25 • 8:15 AM - 3:30 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 B

Add to Cart 71 tickets available


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

This full day course will introduce and immerse participants in the Next Generation Science Assessment (NGSA) design approach including unpacking dimensions, developing integrated dimension maps, articulating learning performances, identifying phenomena, and designing tasks.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn the steps for designing 3-dimensional tasks that align with NGSS performance expectations, take into consideration students’ diverse backgrounds, and create their own tasks at the grade level and science topic of their choice.

SPEAKERS:
Joseph Krajcik (CREATE for STEM Institute, Michigan State University: East Lansing, MI), Christopher Harris (WestEd)

Getting a Foothold for Creating Three-Dimensional Classroom-Based Assessment Tasks

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 A


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Learn a design process for creating three-dimensional assessment tasks that support instruction and student learning. Participants will be introduced to each phase: unpacking dimensions, developing integrated dimension maps, articulating learning performances, identifying phenomena, and designing tasks.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn the steps of a systematic process for designing three-dimensional tasks that align with NGSS performance expectations, take into consideration students’ diverse backgrounds, and can be used in classrooms to provide information to teachers and students to improve learning.

SPEAKERS:
Joseph Krajcik (CREATE for STEM Institute, Michigan State University: East Lansing, MI)

Intro to curriculum anchored assessment systems

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 A


STRAND: Leadership and Advocacy

Show Details

What would it look like if we designed all aspects of the assessment system to prioritize impact on instruction and students? Traditional ideas about assessment systems describe assessment systems in the ideal world, where state summative assessments have the smallest footprint, and meaningful classroom assessments are the most important component. However, in practice, we know this is not always the case–because of the stakes and funding attached to large scale testing (both perceived and real), assessments that are not meant to inform instruction end up shaping a lot of the decisions educators make about student learning. In this session, we will discuss how we rectify this in assessment system design, including examples and implications for state, district, and classroom assessments. The session will include opportunities for participants to inform the development of policy documents to inform assessment system development.

TAKEAWAYS:
Systems of assessment can center students and instruction, and simultaneously surface trustworthy information for decision-making – if they are intentionally designed to do so.

SPEAKERS:
Sara Cooper (Contextus), Kelley Aitken (Winchester Public Schools: Winchester, VA)

Lessons Learned in 3D Assessment Development

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 A


STRAND: Leadership and Advocacy

Show Details

In this interactive session, we share important lessons learned through our work with states, educators, and developers to support equitable systems of science assessment. These lessons can help us develop better 3D assessment tasks, processes, and systems that lead to better outcomes for learners. With over a decade of assessment evaluation and design experience, our team is excited to share ideas for how to improve the 3D assessment design process. These lessons range from shifting assessment development to focus on 3D sensemaking to thinking holistically about unpacking and design to taking an assessment system lens throughout the development process. We will engage participants in activities that demonstrate our lessons learned and connect to how these lessons lead to equitable curriculum-anchored assessment systems. The resources and processes shared in this session are applicable to K-12 science learning. The session will be interactive.

TAKEAWAYS:
Three-dimensional assessment design is tricky -- come join us to discuss how we can take a systems approach and develop better 3-D assessments.

SPEAKERS:
Kelley Aitken (Winchester Public Schools: Winchester, VA), Sara Cooper (Contextus), Dawn Novak (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL)

Sensemaking First: Designing Assessments to Elicit 3D Sensemaking

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sensemaking with the three dimensions is the focal construct we want to measure in science assessments - not the phenomenon or problem or the three-dimensions. Making sense of phenomena and/or problems is how students show us they can use the three dimensions to figure out something. This is what we want to assess and how we will really know that students understand the three dimensions. Yet, centering sensemaking in assessment design is difficult and often sensemaking is missing in assessments. Join us for a deep dive into sensemaking and 3D assessment. In this interactive session, participants will engage with exemplary examples of sensemaking in assessment tasks and practice foregrounding sensemaking in assessment design. The resources and processes shared in this session are applicable to K-12 science learning. The session will be interactive.

TAKEAWAYS:
Leave with examples of 3-D sensemaking in assessment tasks and activities for building better assessments that elicit student sensemaking.

SPEAKERS:
Sara Cooper (Contextus), Kelley Aitken (Winchester Public Schools: Winchester, VA)

We Built a Large-Scale Summative Science Assessment with In-Service Educators You Should Too!

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Trianon E


STRAND: Leadership and Advocacy

Show Details

Presenters will discuss how a partnership with the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) and the SIU STEM Education Research Center @ Carbondale, IL built a 100% IL-developed Science Assessment. There was a concerted effort by SIU to include willing and qualified IL educators to score constructed responses and item development. It proved to be a powerful professional learning experience. Participants improved their understanding of NGSS (Illinois Learning Standards in Science (ILS-S/NGSS) and classroom practices. Participants report this experience was rewarding personally and professionally, and their classroom instruction benefited students. We will present participant survey data and testimonials to support our claims. Teachers often say there is a lack of meaningful and rewarding NGSS/science professional learning opportunities. We found the Illinois Science Assessment Project is one of the few. We suggest other states, agencies consider the same.

TAKEAWAYS:
Meaningfully including in-service educators in developing your state assessment will transform the black box of large-scale summative assessment to a joint endeavor that will see teacher buy-in and professional development increase, and student learning and scores go up.

SPEAKERS:
Harvey Henson (Southern Illinois University Carbondale: Carbondale, IL), Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

The Importance of Problematizing in 3D Assessments for Student Engagement & Sensemaking

Friday, October 27 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Positioning phenomena and problems in ways that elicit sensemaking from students requires that they are problematized—in other words, that phenomena are presented in a way that highlights a productive uncertainty for students to figure out. Sensemaking requires that there is something authentically uncertain to the students engaged with the task in which they need to make sense of. When a phenomenon-based scenario is problematized, it enables sensemaking by focusing thinking on an authentic, productive uncertainty central to the phenomenon that requires the targeted dimensions (i.e., assessment targets) to figure out. In this session, participants will analyze examples of highly compelling tasks that support problematizing by students as they represent their sensemaking. The resources and processes shared in this session are applicable to K-12 science learning. The session will be interactive.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will engage with a range of assessment scenarios to figure out what it means for a task to be problematized.

SPEAKERS:
Sara Cooper (Contextus), Dawn Novak (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL)

Stop Reinventing the Wheel: Utilizing OER Performance Tasks to Make Student Learning Visible

Friday, October 27 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2209


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Too often teachers spend valuable time creating performance tasks in science to encourage sensemaking in their students and to make student thinking more visible. This session will highlight available OER resources that have been compiled across multiple sites. Using these tasks as a starting point, participants will explore ways to adapt these tasks to meet the needs of their classroom. Participants will learn strategies for increasing rigor, providing different levels of support, and providing opportunities to increase student engagement through student voice and choice.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants in this session will leave with an understanding of the OER tasks available for classroom use and strategies to adapt these tasks for their classroom. Strategies will include examples of support for scaffolding, giving meaningful feedback, and increasing student voice and choice.

SPEAKERS:
Kelley Aitken (Winchester Public Schools: Winchester, VA)

An Introduction to Designing Three-Dimensional Assessment Tasks to Support NGSS Teaching and Learning

Friday, October 27 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 C


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

This course is designed to introduce participants to the Next Generation Science Assessment (NGSA) design approach including unpacking dimensions, developing integrated dimension maps, articulating learning performances, identifying phenomena, and designing tasks.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn the steps of a systematic process for designing 3-dimensional tasks that align with NGSS performance expectations, take into consideration students’ diverse backgrounds, and can be used in classrooms to provide information to teachers and students to improve learning.

SPEAKERS:
Joseph Krajcik (CREATE for STEM Institute, Michigan State University: East Lansing, MI), Christopher Harris (WestEd)

CONSTRUCTing Effective Assessment Questions Using the NGSS DCIs

Friday, October 27 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2205



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA-KC 2023, CONSTRUCT presentation, NSTA upload.pptx

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Using the Disciplinary Core Ideas and a research-based “citizen science” approach, science educators contributed their own test items, and also helped to revise existing test items in order to address crucial issues such as difficulty, gender, and racial/ethnic bias that were present in the item analysis characteristics. We share the analysis and results of these efforts so that educators can assess their own test items to be more inclusive of all students understandings in one of the dimensions of the 3-D approach to learning. Learn what changes contributed to improvement of the item as well as what types of changes or revisions made the item worse than before. We also share results of field testing of these items in student classrooms and discuss the importance of incorporating students’ misconceptions into the response choices to capture their true understanding of science concepts as outlined in the DCIs.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn to evaluate assessment questions that you use to assess students’ sensemaking of elements outlined in the NGSS DCIs. Are the questions free of bias, not too difficult, indicative of overall student performance? Do they include common misconceptions that students hold? Access a free resource.

SPEAKERS:
Cynthia Crockett (Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian: Cambridge, MA)

Alternative Approaches to (Pre)Assessment

Friday, October 27 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2206


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

In this session, participants will consider three alternatives to traditional multiple-choice pre-assessments: modeling, self-documentation, and class discussions. We will discuss the purpose of pre-assessments as a critical data point for instructional planning, especially with many schools moving towards PLC structures around data cycles. We will see examples of these three alternative strategies for pre-assessment (which can also be used as formative assessment structures). For each assessment structure, we will discuss how to collect and use data. Authentic examples will be provided from the presenter’s middle school and high school classrooms.The session will synthesize and apply ideas from the following ACESSE Stem Teaching Tools: Modeling #8 / self-documentation #31 / class discussions #6, #35 / using pre-assessments #15, #18, #25, #34, #37. These STEM teaching tools will be shared with participants to continue their learning beyond the 60-minute session.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how to use different assessment formats to collect data without relying on multiple-choice questions. The assessment formats allow students to use knowledge & experiences of a phenomenon or science idea while providing meaningful information to guide instructional choices.

SPEAKERS:
Stephanie Alderman-Oler (Washington High School: Kansas City, KS)

Multiple Paths to Equitable Assessment

Friday, October 27 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 A


STRAND: Leadership and Advocacy

Show Details

A key goal of this work is to consider how NGSS assessments can be developed and used to advance equity. This framework draws upon interdisciplinary research and best practices to describe student-centered systems of science assessment. The framework explicitly connects what the field has learned about supporting students in becoming confident, savvy, scientific thinkers with best practices in measuring, monitoring, and providing feedback toward multidimensional science expectations.Participants will receive an equity framework for assessment that has been intentionally designed to help users (1) identify features of high-quality tasks, (2) examine effective assessment implementation practices, and (3) interrogate how assessments are used to support the diversity of students who engage in science learning in finding success. This equity framework has been used with teachers to (re)design assessments to be equitable for their population of students. The resources and processes shared

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will use a newly developed equity framework to consider multiple ways to center equity in assessment tasks and systems. Participants will use this equity framework to analyze example assessments for alignment to multiple equity goals.

SPEAKERS:
Sara Cooper (Contextus)

Does coherence perspective matter? Examining a comparison of 5E and storylines curricula on students’ academic achievement and attitudes toward science.

Friday, October 27 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Dissertation Defense Presentation.pdf
Copy of presentation - you can search for the full dissertation on ProQuest.

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Educators have struggled with maintaining student engagement in science, especially as students transition from primary to middle school and upper grades (Vedder-Weiss & Fortus, 2012). With the adoption of the Next Generation Science Standards, teachers are looking for curricula to support its implementation. Two curricula, mySci 5E and OpenSciEd storylines, were compared in terms of student academic achievement and attitudes toward science. The research questions were: (1) To what extent is there a difference between achievement in science by eighth grade students experiencing the OpenSciEd storyline science curriculum and those experiencing MySci 5E as measured by end of unit assessment scores? (2) To what extent is the difference between attitudes towards science by eighth grade students experiencing the OpenSciEd storyline science curriculum and those experiencing MySci 5E as measured by My Attitudes Toward Science (MATS) surveys (Hillman et al., 2016)?

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will hear about the results of the study and potential impacts of the perception of coherence on students’ academic achievements and attitudes toward science. Implications for future research will be discussed.

SPEAKERS:
Nina Blanton (Educator: , MO), Nicole Vick (Northwestern University)

The NSTA Atlas of the Three Dimensions

Friday, October 27 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 C


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The NSTA Atlas of the Three Dimensions maps out learning progressions based on the Framework for K–12 Science Education and the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). The 62 maps in the Atlas organize all of the elements from standards on a particular topic (e.g., modeling, patterns, or definitions of energy) on a single page. The elements from grades K–2 are at the bottom of the page, and those from grades 9–12 are at the top. Arrows connect elements to indicate how ideas in a particular topic build on each other and how elements in different topics connect to one another. Studying the maps in the Atlas and the additional resources in the appendixes can provide educators with new insights about the standards. This session will provide an overview of how to read a map, the other features of the Atlas, and how educators can use this powerful navigational tool to develop and implement curriculum, instruction, and assessment.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how to read the maps and use other tools in the Atlas to understand and interpret standards, and plan instructional sequences as part of their work in curriculum, instruction, and assessment.

SPEAKERS:
Ted Willard (Discovery Education: Silver Spring, MD)

Claim-Evidence-Reasoning (CER): Are You CERtain Your Students Understand the Data?

Friday, October 27 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2504 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: STEMscopes by Accelerate Learning

CER gets students to explain phenomena in a scientific way. Let’s use investigations to demonstrate how to use data collection to drive data-based conclusions. Guide students in how to think deeper, write scientifically, & incorporate vocabulary that strengthens their understanding of a phenomenon.

SPEAKERS:
Margo Dye (Accelerate Learning Inc.: Houston, TX)

A Library of High-Quality Three-Dimensional Assessments That Are Easy To Use and Provide Information That is Actually Useful To Teachers

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2201


STRAND: Tech Tools

Show Details

The session will give teachers an opportunity to see examples of the rich and meaningful three-dimensional assessment that are called for by the NGSS. This session, as a result, will include 20 minutes of audience participation in student hat and 20 minutes for examining student responses in order to make sense of student thinking. Participants will leave the session with access to a library of high-quality instructional 3-D assessment that they can use in their own classrooms. The agenda for this session is: • A discussion of what makes assessments useful for teaching and learning (5 min) • A discussion of the difference between 3-D, 2-D, and 1-D assessments (5 min). • An opportunity for participants to experience an example of high-quality 3-D assessment (20 min) • An overview of a tech tool that teachers use to access and use a library of these assessments (5 min) • Questions (5 min)

TAKEAWAYS:
Characteristics of high-quality three-dimensional assessments include: (1) can be used to examine how students use a DCI, CC, and SEP to figure something out, (2) easy to administer and take, and (3) include tools that lead to useful insights about student thinking.

SPEAKERS:
Todd Hutner (The University of Alabama: Austin, TX)

Reimagining Exit Tickets

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Engage in a mini design sprint to develop curriculum-aligned exit tickets. Together, we will use an equity framework and Universal Design to create exit tickets that support equitable sensemaking and 3-D science learning. We will coach you through a process to develop exit tickets that assess your students’ experiences and sensemaking. This workshop will focus on areas that support their learning such as: metacognition and reflection, applying their learning to a new phenomenon, connecting to their experiences and expertise outside of the classroom, and student experience in the learning environment. We will bring in examples of curriculum-anchored assessment using open source curricula. You will walk away with a set of exit tickets to assess student experience in 3-D learning that will give you information to inform instruction and support equitable classroom assessment practices.

TAKEAWAYS:
Gathering evidence of student experiences through short assessment opportunities can help build meaningful relationships with students and provide rich information to inform instructional moves.

SPEAKERS:
Calvin Atkins (Bellingham High School: Bellingham, WA), Colleen LaMotte (Middle School Science Teacher: Shorline, WA), Jenna Mobley (: White Salmon, WA)

NMLSTA-Don’t Cross the Streams; Assessment Literacy in the Inquiry-Based Classroom

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 B


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Based on the work of Andrew Ho and Margaret Heritage, this session will outline the four major “quadrants” of the assessment matrix and review the nature and the stakeholders for each. We focus then on the process of moving from a structured Formative Assessment Process to an Invisible Formative Assessment Process, and benchmarks for delivering high-quality assessment alongside high-quality instruction.

Lastly, we will focus on the NGSS specific requirements for classroom-based assessment and align it to the Herron scale of inquiry to ensure that our assessment process is inclined in the same direction as our instruction.

TAKEAWAYS:
Implementation of inquiry-based standards and the shift to a more inquiry-based classroom requires a clear vision of the assessment opportunities and processes classroom teachers will need to engage in and administrators will need to support and review.

SPEAKERS:
John White (Breakthrough Technologies: , IL)

Putting 3-D Assessments to the Test: Building Common Assessments Together

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2211


STRAND: Leadership and Advocacy

Show Details

Develop your knowledge, skills, and confidence to lead your school or district toward successful NGSS assessment development. We will share one district’s journey to engage teachers in developing NGSS-aligned common assessments focused on SEPs, access, and equity.

TAKEAWAYS:
Develop your knowledge, skills, and confidence to lead your school or district toward successful NGSS assessment development with a focus on SEPs, access, and equity.

SPEAKERS:
Julia Smith (Riverside Unified School District: Riverside, CA)

“How to Cook a Turkey”: Students’ Misconceptions in Science, What We Assume vs. What They Think

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA-KC, Oct. 2023, How to Cook a Turkey”, Students' MIsconceptions..... upload.pptx

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Our students make sense of science and construct their ideas from many experiences, then use that “knowledge” as a foundation for their learning. However, it may not always be a solid foundation. We can help students develop their science knowledge through a deeper understanding of the misconceptions they hold, using phenomena, observation, sensemaking, and robust assessment. We can then assess students’ ideas and misconceptions in the sciences at various grade levels creating and using research-based assessments, understanding the importance of including their ideas in those assessments. When each item contains a choice between a scientifically correct answer and a common, widely-held, student misconception, we can more accurately evaluate our students’ true understanding of the DCI components of the NGSS.

TAKEAWAYS:
Educators will learn how to work with misconceptions that students hold in order to incorporate those into useful assessments. Use students’ sensemaking to discover ways to get at those ideas, and share your students’ misconceptions, hear others as well, and build research-based assessments.

SPEAKERS:
Cynthia Crockett (Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian: Cambridge, MA)

Compacting Curriculum in Junior High Science

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2204


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Curriculum compacting replaces content that students already know with new content, enrichment options, or other activities. It can be effective for: students who have already mastered the material and those students that may learn material quickly. Research shows that students who received compacted curriculum scored significantly higher on achievement posttests than their peers who received "all of the work" with no compacting. On my team, we compacted curriculum for several units last year and our mastery scores drastically improved on STAAR from prior years. Compacted curriculum allowed our GT (and advanced) learners to have an opportunity for enrichment rather than learning things they already knew. Participants will be receiving resources and examples of curriculum compacting in science. They are encouraged to ask questions throughout. During the session, attendees can look at their own curriculum to determine where in their science units (and when) they could try compacting.

TAKEAWAYS:
1) Attendees will learn WHAT Curriculum Compacting is and WHY it is so important in the science classroom. 2) Attendees will be shown HOW to begin compacting in their classrooms. 3) Attendees will walk away with resources to help them begin compacting, and will be given opportunities to ask questions.

SPEAKERS:
Sandra Rodriguez (Katy ISD: Katy, TX)

Be An #A11y Ally: Creative Tools For Science Visualization

Saturday, October 28 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2205



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
https://www.katiefielding.com/nsta23

STRAND: Tech Tools

Show Details

Explore tools you can use with students to help them visualize and create their science content. With Canva, Adobe Express, and Book Creator, you can allow students choice in the action and expression of their science content knowledge, supporting UDL in your classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
Bring creativity into your 5'E classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Katherine Fielding (Prince William County Schools)

Digital Moves To Boost Student Agency

Saturday, October 28 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 A


STRAND: Tech Tools

Show Details

Digital notebooking is a tool that can support both teaching and learning and can be utilized for a variety of purposes. The time during this 60 minute session will be split between the presenters sharing information including examples of various ways to implement digital notebooks that align with research-based best practices and participants having time to plan and prepare usage for their own setting. Teachers will leave with ready-to-use takeaways to assist them in empowering students to not only learn content more independently but also reflect on their learning path and level of understanding to gear up for future success. Teachers will also be able to explore how the notebooks provide quick access to each student's progress in learning and the ability to give feedback when and where it is needed.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will leave this session with a digital notebook template and the knowledge and resources to create and implement one successfully, as well as a framework that coicides with the use of a digital notebook and fits any curriculum to allow for students to have influence on their learning.

SPEAKERS:
Vera Hayslip (7th grade Science: Cincinnati, OH), Kelly Hartings (Indian Hill Middle School: CINCINNATI, OH)

Strategies for Differentiating Professional Learning

Saturday, October 28 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 E



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Strategies for Differentiating Professional Learning Presentation - NSTA 2023
Presentation Slides
Teacher Profiles

STRAND: Leadership and Advocacy

Show Details

At its core, differentiation stems from the recognition that individual learners arrive in classrooms each day with ranging knowledge, experiences, abilities, ways of thinking, curiosities, and dispositions. A one-size-fits-all approach to teaching and learning undermines the potential of all students to achieve successfully, yet we struggle with how to meet the needs of individual students in our classrooms. Similarly, we know that one-shot workshops are not an effective means of professional development (PD). Yet, we continue to provide one-shot workshops to teach and rarely, if ever, do we consider how PD may need to be differentiated for teachers. We may differentiate by focusing on different content areas, grade levels, or contexts, but rarely do we take time to look at what individual teachers need. Just like students, we need to consider the individual needs of all teachers. This session will provide several strategies for differentiating PD for teachers.

TAKEAWAYS:
Differentiation is not just for the classroom, it is also a component of designing effective professional learning.

SPEAKERS:
Brooke Whitworth (Clemson University: Clemson, SC)

Improving Pre-Engineering and Computer Science Education through Micro-Credentials: Key Learning from a State Agency

Saturday, October 28 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2201


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

In 2019, The Louisiana Department of Education was awarded an Education, Innovation, and Research(EIR) grant titled “Improving Pre-Engineering and Computer Science Education through Micro-Credentials”. As one of very few EIR grants awarded to a state education agency, we have had the opportunity to blend both research and practice through multiple lenses as we engage teachers and students across our state. The project has served as a mechanism for the research team to examine how job embedded professional development impacts the practices of our teachers, the content delivery in our classrooms, and its effects on student learning. We plan to share key take aways, including insights into the writing and revision process, how the series took shape over time, and preliminary outcomes from the qualitative measures utilized. This may be of interest to participants considering portfolio based assessments as a means of improving professional learning within their own context.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will gain insight from the perspective of a state agency into the process and key learnings from a four-year project focused on portfolio-based assessments in STEM.

SPEAKERS:
John Underwood (Louisiana Department of Education: No City, No State)

Teacher Leader: Standards to live by

Saturday, October 28 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 E


STRAND: Leadership and Advocacy

Show Details

In May 2008 a group of educators exanimated current research and the critical role that teacher leaders play in education. Upon reviewing this data, they believe that teacher leadership is the most powerful method to promote effective and collaborative teaching practices leading to student success. The Teaching Leadership Exploratory Consortium developed the Teacher Leader Model Standards. This set of seven domains describes the knowledge base and skills needed by a teacher leader to assume a leadership role in all aspects of education. In this session participants will examine and discuss the Teacher Leader Model Standards. Digging into the standards they will describe key actions and practices for each of the seven domains. Participants will be asked to reflect on their role as a teacher leader and select one of the domains to focus on as they begin or continue their work as a teacher leader.

TAKEAWAYS:
Digging into the standards, participants will describe key actions and practices for each of the seven domains. They will be asked to reflect on their role as a teacher leader and select one of the domains to focus on as they begin or continue their work as a teacher leader.

SPEAKERS:
Jenne VandePanne (Michigan Technological University/Newaygo Public Schools: Newaygo, MI), Jessica Wagenmaker (Holton Middle School: Holton, MI)

Research to Practice in Secondary Science Education

Saturday, October 28 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2104 A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA Speed Share Presentation_23.pptx

Show Details

Join us for a speed-sharing session on the latest research in secondary science education and how it can be applied to the classroom. This is a great opportunity to learn about the latest research and how it can help you make a difference in your students' learning.

STEM IRL: STEM Trailblazers for children of color
Addressing inequity in STEM professions starts with exposing students to current minority trailblazers in the field. If students see successful people who look like them, they can begin visualizing themselves in those roles, which can ignite a spark of curiosity and lead to a future in STEM.

Curricular Interventions to Improve Rural High School Students' Relatability to Scientists
Scientist Spotlights homework assignments that feature non-stereotypical scientists can help students see their possible selves in science. Students that author assignments on diverse scientists improve their science identity more than students that complete teacher-authored assignments.

Connecting electrochemistry to materials science: From modeling redox reactions to exploring materials science with dye-sensitized solar cells
Presentation of lab-based modeling approach to metal-metal ion (“single replacement”) reactions. Discussion of ways to integrate materials science concepts, specifically electrochemical cells and dye-sensitized solar cell construction, into the chemistry curriculum.

TAKEAWAYS:
Hear from experts in the field about innovative approaches to teaching science, as well as practical tips for improving your own practice.

SPEAKERS:
Christa Buccola Henriquez (MS 363 The Academy for Personal Leadership and Excellence: Bronx, NY), Fabiola Perez (Student: Edwardsville, IL), Maurina Aranda (Assistant Professor: Edwardsville, IL), Aaron Musson (Omaha Public Schools: Omaha, NE)

Experiencing Engagement in Science

Saturday, October 28 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2101



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Presentation
This is the Canva I made for the presentation and it saved as a power point.

STRAND: Leadership and Advocacy

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Teachers and students are still adjusting to life in a post-pandemic classroom. There were many educational impacts in the wake of school closings during the pandemic. One of these was a dependence on technology that still lingers in the classroom today. While technology is important, it cannot replace the impact of a classroom environment that supports collaborative, student-centered, personalized learning. Teachers and students need to refresh themselves on how to engage in experiential learning again and how setting the right tone in your classroom can develop a supportive classroom environment. In this session, we will discuss different strategies and activities to build relationships with our students, how to incorporate student-centered learning, and how student engagement leads to motivation.

TAKEAWAYS:
The main takeaway from this session is a collection of engagement strategies and best practices to use in a classroom setting to establish a classroom culture supportive of student-centered, personalized learning.

SPEAKERS:
Michelle Norwood (Sangaree Middle School: Ladson, SC)

More than a Score: Three Practical Strategies for Maximizing Assessment

Saturday, October 28 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 1501 B


STRAND: Research to Practice

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Sponsoring Company: Stile Education

N/A

SPEAKERS:
Shawna Jensen (Stile Education: Portland, OR)

CONSTRUCTing Effective Assessment Questions using the NGSS DCIs

Saturday, October 28 • 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Share-a-thon Area


STRAND: STEM Haven

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Using the Disciplinary Core Ideas and a research-based “citizen science” approach, science educators contributed their own test items, and helped to revise existing test items in order to address crucial issues such as difficulty, gender, and racial/ethnic bias that were present in the item analysis characteristics. We share the analysis and results of these efforts so that educators can assess their own test items to be more inclusive of all students’ understandings in one of the dimensions of the 3D-approach to learning. Learn what changes contributed to improvement of the item as well as what types of changes or revisions made the item worse than before. We also share results of field testing of these items in student classrooms and discuss the importance of incorporating students’ misconceptions into the response choices to capture their true understanding of science concepts as outlined in the DCIs.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn to evaluate assessment questions that you use to assess students’ sensemaking of elements outlined in the NGSS DCIs. Are the questions free of bias, not too difficult, indicative of overall student performance? Do they include common misconceptions that students hold? Utilize a free resource.

SPEAKERS:
Philip Sadler (Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian: Cambridge, MA), Cynthia Crockett (Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian: Cambridge, MA)

Teachers Share Teachers

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 E


STRAND: Leadership and Advocacy

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Struggling with your PLC community? Going to Teacher Pay Teachers and spending your money to find lesson plans? We can find a better way to support teachers through an open resource PLC. Due to increasing teacher burnout, teacher shortages, and high teacher turnover our team felt inclined to find ways to better support teachers in the day-to-day classroom environment (new teachers, substitutes, long term absences). Our science PLC will present the strategies, resources, and digital tools we utilize to create a PLC that functions at a higher level. We will discuss strategies for reducing turnover, keeping up teacher morale, and implementing large projects for large groups.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn about our method for streamlining science planning within our PLC.

SPEAKERS:
Samantha Huber (Science Teacher: Topeka, KS), Kathryn Louderback (Washburn Rural Middle School: Topeka, KS), Mackenzie Casey (Science Teacher: Topeka, KS)

Teaching Science with Superheroes: Engage Students with Illustrations from Movies, TV, Comics, and More!

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2104 A


STRAND: Research to Practice

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Student engagement is a vital element for effective science instruction (Heddy & Sinatra, 2013). However, students typically become less engaged in science as they advance in school years (Ofsted, 2015). Superheroes have been a mainstay in popular culture and multimedia for decades. Science teachers can harness this widespread interest to enhance lessons, broaden assessments, and increase student engagement. Participants will examine multiple superhero examples, each with applications to specific NGSS performance expectations. They will also consider research content from science journals and organizations (National Geographic, Scientific American, NASA, NOAA, WHO, etc.) to catalyze further exploration and extensions. In addition to specific activities, teachers will practice analyzing popular culture and research for wider engagement. They will also review important copyright parameters and “fair use” in the classroom, with an emphasis on appropriate implementation.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants in this interactive session will examine a variety of multimedia superhero examples, with a focus on immediate classroom implementation AND legal copyright “fair use.” In addition to specific lessons, teachers will practice analyzing and applying media and research to engage students.

SPEAKERS:
Daniel Bergman (Wichita State University: Wichita, KS)

The Power of Self-Documentation: Using Students Funds of Knowledge Toward Assessment

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2104 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1FQZrSxAQlkcZIbQaj2qqoJeB0Dl0quOEC0hC6_DX6J0/edit?usp=sharing

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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How do you see what science knowledge your students bring to the units you are teaching in your classroom? This session will showcase a STEM Teaching Tool of Self-Documentation where students give you, the teacher, insight as to what knowledge they bring to your science unit along with their cultural stance. The presentation will show how self-documentation is used in a middle school science classroom. Teachers will also go through the steps of self-documentation themselves, as well as be presented information about what information students can share about what Science Sense they might have.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. This session will provide knowledge of how to use self-documentation in the classroom. 2. Teachers will understand the importance of gaining your students' perspective in what they bring to your classroom culturally. 3. Self-documentation gives teachers knowledge of student misconceptions.

SPEAKERS:
Betsy Lawrence (Summit Trail Middle School: Olathe, KS)

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