2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

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FILTERS APPLIED:9 - 12, Hands-On Workshop, STEM Haven, Biology

 

Rooms and times subject to change.
27 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

I've Got Good News and Bad News: You're Warm-Blooded!

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Big Joe Turner A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Homeothermic, or warm-blooded, animals have several game-changing advantages compared to ectothermic, or cold-blooded creatures. Yet in the real world of Nature, nothing is free, and a price must be paid for these advantages. In order to supply all cells with oxygen and fuel, warm-blooded animals require an enormous blood supply and an efficient circulatory system with a 4-chambered heart at the center of it all. In this session, participants will work with research-generated data to build a mathematical model that allows them to estimate their own blood volumes. In addition, we will look at metabolic data comparing warm and cold-blooded animals, and the oxygen requirements of each. Finally, we will evaluate the food input requirements of warm-blooded animals in cold environments compared to warm environments.

TAKEAWAYS:
Being "warm-blooded" brings both good news and bad news for an animal. In this session, attendees will calculate their blood volume, why a 4-chambered heart is needed to move all that blood around, and how the circulatory system is the key to unlock all of these physiological phenomena!

SPEAKERS:
Jeffrey Lukens (Retired Science Teacher: Sioux Falls, SD)

Evaluating Information & Digital Literacy

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Andy Kirk



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Evaluating Info & Digital Literacy Slides
Evaluating Info & Digital Literacy Slides

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

One of the most powerful skills we can develop in our students to practice scientific literacy when they leave our classroom is the skill of critically evaluating information. This is particularly pertinent today with an uncharted landscape of misinformation and social media. We will share our experience as high school science teachers of explicitly incorporating the NGSS Scientific Practice of Obtaining, Evaluating, and Communicating information (SEP8) into our classrooms with proficiency-based assessment. We will share the research that influenced our work, resources that include scaffolds, activities, and assessments, and lastly, reflections and strategies after having explicitly taught and assessed evaluating information. After our first year teaching this scientific practice, we asked ourselves, "How had we not taught this skill before!?"

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will be provided with a framework and resources to help students engage in arguably the most important skill needed for them to continue to develop their scientific literacy outside of and after school -- to critically evaluate information for themselves and for a functioning democracy.

SPEAKERS:
Brett Erdmann (Adlai E. Stevenson High School: Lincolnshire, IL), Thomas Wolfe (Adlai E. Stevenson High School: Lincolnshire, IL)

Is Bigfoot Among Us? Follow the Evidence to Combat Pseudoscience

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Basie Ballroom B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Science is often portrayed as conducted in a simple linear way (i.e., the scientific method). But this is rarely true in actual scientific practice. Instead of a step-by-step series of actions, science is conducted more cyclically, with scientists working back and forth between pursuing exploration and discovery, assessing benefits and outcomes, and developing analysis and feedback. At the core of this process is evidence, against which ideas in science are constantly tested. Evidence is what drives all scientific understanding. By examining environmental DNA (eDNA) collected from areas where recent Bigfoot sightings have occurred, participants can provide students with a logical and rational way scientists can use evidence to dispel the pseudoscience of cryptozoology. Upon completing this activity, attendees can apply their new knowledge to how eDNA is currently used to identify viruses and diseases in wastewater. Resources: https://ncse.ngo/supporting-teachers/classroom-resources

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will explore and appreciate the importance of evidence to the scientific process by taking a deep dive into an NGSS storyline sequence developed to help students understand that science must be substantiated by multiple lines of evidence to be accepted by the scientific community.

SPEAKERS:
Blake Touchet (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA), Ericca Thornhill (Mizzou Academy: Columbia, MO), Lin Andrews (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA)

Lessons from Our Classrooms: Successfully Supporting Emerging Multilinguals

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Jay McShann A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Slides with links to resources on slide 27

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Participants will learn research-based methods for supporting emerging multilinguals in their science classroom. These methods will be modeled by sharing sections of Biology labs that have been modified to support English learners. At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to take home sample lessons and labs specifically developed for a multilingual science classroom. Teaching methods presented are based on research and actual classroom experience, developed collaboratively by a team including a science teacher, English as a new language teacher, and a language development researcher. Labs shared with participants are designed to foster critical thinking while incorporating appropriate scaffolding. Lab handouts for participants to take back to their classrooms will include the following topics: scientific method, ecology, enzymes, biomolecules, cell transport, photosynthesis, and cellular respiration.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn and practice teaching techniques for supporting English learners in their science class while engaging with lessons that model these procedures.

SPEAKERS:
Tina Ahmadi (PhD Student: Indianapolis, IN)

The Cell Game

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Mary Lou Williams



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
QR codes for website and presentations
You will need to make a free account to have access to my community.
The Cell Building Game 2023.pdf
This is the presentation I'll be doing. Documents will be available at the presentation.

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Over the course of the last five years I have developed an engaging resource based card game to teach the cell. I grew disillusioned the projects and activities that we were currently doing as it didn't get to the heart of the parts of the cell. The Cell Game fixed that. In one class students compete to build different organelles that require resource cards. By having more organelles, your cell becomes more complex. The students LOVE the cell game and clamor to play it at lunch after being exposed to it. I'd love to share it with other teachers.

TAKEAWAYS:
Build a cell. Divide. Grow. Get excited about cell microbiology!

SPEAKERS:
Jason Zackowski (Science Curriculum Lead)

Act It Out: Visualizing Cellular Processes

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Big Joe Turner A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Action Potentials Infographic.png
Slides from the Act It Out Presentation

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The more senses we use when learning something, the better we are able to remember it, so in this session teachers will learn how to incorporate movement into their classes. Here are the activities we will do: 1) Modeling an action potential. The graph of an action potential looks a lot like a wave and so to help students remember this, we say the stages of the graph while we make a wave with our bodies (like in a stadium). Then students need to describe what is happening at the cellular level while their bodies are moving. 2) Modeling translation. Participants will be given supplies to take on the role of tRNAs, with anticodons and amino acids, and then show how they enter the ribosome through the A, P and E sites to undergo translation. 3) If time permits, we can also model a signal transduction pathway or DNA replication. 4) The last 15 minutes will be for groups to come up with one way they can incorporate movement and present this to the group.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn how to get your students up and moving as they use their bodies to act out cellular processes.

SPEAKERS:
Ilana Saxe (The Lawrenceville School: Lawrenceville, NJ)

Be a Genetic Counselor!

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Big Joe Turner A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Genetic Counselor Project Folder
This Google Drive folder has all of the materials for this project, including: the PDFs of the open access primary literature articles, teacher launch pad/key, student directions, sample presentation, the slides from the talk, an explanation of statistics and the project rubric. Please make sure to provide attribution to ilana saxe of The Lawrenceville School, thanks!

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

While not always the case, the experiences that students have had in middle school with genetics can be limited to plug and chug Punnett squares investigating traits in aliens, SpongeBob, and dragons. In an effort to help students see how patterns of inheritance and gene expression can be more nuanced than that and to connect to a real world example, I created a Genetic Counselor project for the 9th graders at The Lawrenceville School (Lawrenceville, NJ). In this session, participants will have the opportunity to work through aspects of the project, specifically creating the pedigree and working with primary literature and analyzing data. This project is great because it includes representation of people of different backgrounds and identities, is based in the real world, introduces students to a career path, and teaches about primary literature. Please see the project launch pad here: https://tinyurl.com/GCPNSTA --Thanks!

TAKEAWAYS:
Work through the genetic counselor project from a patient background, solving a pedigree, learning how to use NCBI, and interpreting primary literature. You will take home the student directions, exemplar projects, list of relevant primary literature articles, and teacher key.

SPEAKERS:
Ilana Saxe (The Lawrenceville School: Lawrenceville, NJ)

Equitable Discussions of Nature-Culture Relationships: OpenSciEd Biology

Friday, October 27 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 F



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Lesson 2 Reading
short framework_Nature_Culture_Relations_rev101321.pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

OpenSciEd Biology Units incorporate frameworks such as 5 Dimensions of Reasoning About Complex Socio-Ecological Systems developed by Learning in Places to support multiple Ways of Knowing and interacting with phenomena. These frameworks bring conversations about power and historicity into the classroom and help students consider multiple points of view when making decisions involving science. The Nature-Culture Relations framework helps students and educators identify the positionality of interest holders to explain different perspectives. Learn how these frameworks are incorporated into biology units.

TAKEAWAYS:
Recognize your own positionality in nature-culture relations and think about how to bring this framework to your students.

SPEAKERS:
Sara Krauskopf (University of Colorado-Boulder: No City, No State), DeAnna Lee Rivers (University of Colorado Boulder: , CA)

All in the Family: The Story of Human Evolution

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Jay McShann A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Although there is no shortage of potential phenomena for teaching about the process of evolution, using human evolution is a sure way to make the topic relevant and engaging for all students. It is also an excellent way to address some of the most common student misconceptions surrounding the subject, such as “humans evolved from monkeys,” “if humans evolved from apes, why are there still apes?” and “humans are the pinnacle of the tree of life and therefore no longer evolving like other organisms.” By examining a wide range of evidence, including different potential variations of hominid skulls (physical replicas, cards, or 3D digital models), geographic data, artifacts, and climate trends, students will be able to piece together a model of hominid phylogeny and learn about the changes in anatomy, behavior, and distribution that led to our unique human features. Resources: https://ncse.ngo/supporting-teachers/classroom-resources

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will explore a range of paleoanthropology evidence to confidently guide students through one of the most engaging evolutionary phenomena – human evolution. Learn about extinct hominid groups and how they are connected to human origins through features, behaviors, and relationships.

SPEAKERS:
Blake Touchet (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA), Lin Andrews (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA)

"H-Two-Poo": Contextualizing High School Science Through Wastewater Testing and Public Health

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Basie Ballroom B


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

In this session, participants will experience part of an NGSS-aligned unit on wastewater testing and COVID-19. This six-lesson unit utilizing the 5E learning approach was developed through the collaboration of educators, engineers, scientists, medical doctors, and public health experts within an NIH-funded project. Attendees will participate in the fourth lesson of the sequence, entitled “H-Two-Poo.” Participants will first test the quality of different water samples to answer the driving question “how do you know if water is safe to use?” Participants will then learn about sources of wastewater, methods of wastewater management, and the development of a wastewater testing protocol to detect the presence of COVID-19. The experiences of high school students and teachers who have participated in the implementation of this phenomenon-based unit will be shared, including data from student surveys and handouts, along with photos of field trips to the community wastewater treatment facility.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will utilize science and engineering practices to collect and analyze water quality data. They will further learn how science and engineering have been used to develop wastewater testing techniques that inform public health decisions in our communities.

SPEAKERS:
Sahar Alameh (University of Kentucky: Lexington, KY), Jeff Chalfant (Ph.D. Candidate), Sagan Goodpaster (University of Kentucky: Lexington, KY)

Whey Protein can be Legen'dairy' in the Classroom

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Big Joe Turner A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

I will be presenting a short storyline I created. It incorporates the phenomena that whey protein comes from cows. Whey protein is a "buzz" item lately with the workout craze, workout supplements, etc. Throughout the storyline, students will make connections with proteins, dairy (cows), other macromolecules, and homeostasis. Students will learn how to make cheese and that the by-product is whey protein. They will test various workout supplements and health foods for macromolecules. They will learn about homeostasis: positive and negative feedback loops through working out (heart rate and breathing rates). Lastly, they will complete a project where they have to figure out which proteins are best for the human body and then create a product and it's packaging (i.e. protein bar, shake, drink, etc). Teachers will get to experience some of the labs and receive all of the paper resources to take back and implement the storyline or parts of the storyline in their classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
If you have never used storylines, this is a great short one you can try in your class. You will leave this session with beneficial resources you can take back and use in your Biology classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Erin Snelling (Hallsville High School: Hallsville, MO)

Experiencing Science by Using Scientific Theater

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Colonial Ballroom



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
AP Biology Theater Evolution Edition.docx
Biology Theater AP Ecology Edition.docx
Biology Theater Cell Signaling Edition.docx
Biology Theater Molecular DNA edition.docx
Chem Theater Example #1.pdf
Chem Theater Example #2.pdf
Chem Theater Example #3.pdf
Chem Theater Example #4.pdf
Chemistry Theater Acids and Bases AP Edition.docx
Chemistry Theater Acids and Bases.docx
Chemistry Theater AP Solutions Edition.docx
Chemistry Theater Bonding.docx
Instructions for Chemistry Theater NSTA.docx

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Scientific Theater might seem like an oxymoron, but over my decade-plus in high school education, it has become a favorite of my students. The goals of this experience are to encourage the attendees/students to be creative in trying to explain sometimes complicated concepts, and to realize that written words and slide presentations are not the only way to explain something. In this workshop, attendees will be given the opportunity to experience Scientific Theater exactly as my students do, by creating their own one-act play explaining a chemical concept. The concept may be one of their own choosing, or there will be several to choose from. After choosing, attendees will split into groups of four, at which point they will collaborate to develop and write a 3-minute play that they best feel illustrates their concept. At the end of the session, volunteer groups will be invited to perform, and it is hoped that the attendees will have seen theater as the powerful and enjoyable tool it is.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will collaborate to create their own plays to describe a scientific concept. After discussion and rehearsal, volunteers will be asked to perform their masterpieces in front of the group. By doing so, attendees will be able to take what they have learned back to their classrooms.

SPEAKERS:
Karen Flummerfelt (Downtown Magnets High School: Los Angeles, CA)

Anchored Inquiry Learning: Designing Meaningful Instruction to Make Sense of Authentic Phenomena

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 F


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The Framework for K-12 Science Education and NGSS calls for 3-D learning grounded in authentic phenomena and problems to ensure relevant learning for all students. Instructional materials design helps achieve these synergistic goals and create meaningful classroom sensemaking and learning. The BSCS Anchored Inquiry Learning (AIL) instructional model succeeds the 5Es and utilizes authentic phenomena/problems to anchor multiple cycles of inquiry and sensemaking, culminating with student explanations/design solutions. AIL employs science education research emphasizing coherence from students’ perspective. In this session, participants will: 1) consider how AIL integrates elements of the 5E instructional model, NextGen Science storylines, and problem-based learning instructional models; 2) experience a sample lesson to deepen their understanding of the approach, and 3) consider their own education contexts and how they can apply AIL to design meaningful learning experiences for their students.

TAKEAWAYS:
The research-based BSCS Anchored Inquiry Learning instructional model succeeds the 5Es and leverages authentic phenomena/problems to anchor cycles of inquiry and sensemaking. This approach provides instructional coherence from students’ perspective, equitable access, and motivation for ALL learners.

SPEAKERS:
Nancy Hopkins-Evans (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO), Cynthia Gay (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO)

Using Cross Cutting Concept thinking to Engage in Life/Earth Science Phenomena in OpenSciEd Biology

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Basie Ballroom A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

OpenSciEd Biology units use a storyline approach to help students figure out answers to their questions in a three-dimensional, coherent, and equitable way. In this session, participants will experience that approach firsthand as they engage with the unit’s anchor in "student hat", experiencing the content as students do in the classroom. Participants will also explore ways to use strategic questioning and the development and use of different models for complex phenomena to encourage students to discuss and advance their understanding about concepts of energy and matter, at different levels of systems. Participants will also see how students develop understanding of the changes in matter and energy in these systems through a coherent series of investigations. These investigations include taking measurements when burning peat and other fuels to build understanding of matter and energy capacities, carbon dioxide production rates for yeast at different temperatures to understand a mechani

TAKEAWAYS:
Complex anchoring and investigative phenomena rooted in cause-and-effect thinking can deeply engage students in disciplinary core ideas and crosscutting concepts related to energy and matter that span across the disciplines of earth and life science, in systems.

SPEAKERS:
Jamie Noll (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO), Sara Krauskopf (University of Colorado-Boulder: No City, No State), DeAnna Lee Rivers (University of Colorado Boulder: , CA)

You Can Have It All! Using Rich Science Content to Build and Assess NGSS Practices

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Basie Ballroom B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA: Skills & Content Participant Resources Folder

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

We will begin by introducing our approach to standards-based learning and providing curriculum documents such as our learning scales derived from the NGSS Science & Engineering practices and Unit “Know, Understand, Do” documents (format adopted from Carol Ann Tomlinson). Participants then engage in a complete learning cycle from the student point of view. This will include a mini task to engage in content and skill development, followed by a formative assessment. We will then share our strategies for self assessment and follow up with a differentiated activity to move participants towards proficiency before showing the summative assessment. Following this learning cycle, participants will have the opportunity to think about or collaborate with others around ways to apply their learning in their own contexts. They will have access to digital examples of content and skill pairings, as well as an opportunity to engage on an individual or small group basis with the presenters.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will walk away with practical applications and examples of skill and content-based instruction and assessment after experiencing an abbreviated learning cycle. This will include science phenomena, differentiated instructional activities, formative assessment, and summative assessment.

SPEAKERS:
Jessica Lemieux (Champlain Valley Union High School: Hinesburg, VT), Rae Bronenkant (Science Teacher: , VT), Sam Parker (Science teacher: Hinesburg, VT), Carly Brown (Champlain Valley Union High School: No City, No State)

Dumpster Dive with STEM

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Andy Kirk


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Connect the human impact of trash pollution to engineering design. Get your students thinking critically and creatively as they collaborate in real-world problem-solving. The global real-world issue of human-generated trash polluting local bodies of water is the main focus of this hands-on session. Using our partnership with the Howard County Conservancy, our students learn about their local watersheds and contribute to a Watershed Report Card. Students see how trash that is often found on our local schoolyards can affect our watershed, and they design a working model for trash removal in a local tributary. Basic coding will be used to design programs that will control sensors and motors through a microcontroller, thus removing the trash from the water source. The model will utilize solar and water power to move the trash into a separate receptacle. Various sensors will also be used to monitor water levels and determine the outcome of the program.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Connecting the human impact of single-use plastics and their effect on aquatic ecosystems; 2. Exposing students to basic coding and engineering design in an NGSS-focused content classroom; and 3. Developing a project that enhances STEM skills in students such as collaboration, curiosity, and creativity.

SPEAKERS:
Jessica Kohout (Educational Consultant: Voorhees, NJ)

Stepping into the shoes of a radiologist: isotopes, medicine, and cell division

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Lester Young B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Slides (for use with students)
Student handout

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Engage your students with a real-world application of physical sciences and biology through our scaffolded nuclear radiology case study. Nuclear medicine is a branch of radiology that uses radioactive materials to diagnose and treat disease. The purpose of this session is to introduce students to medical imaging and nuclear medicine alongside Next Generation Science Standards as they attempt to diagnose and treat a hypothetical patient. In addition to fostering critical thinking, this session connects FDG-PET (a type of nuclear imaging) to the following next generation science standards: 1) Develop models to illustrate the changes in the composition of the nucleus of the atom and the energy released during … fission, fusion, and radioactive decay. (HS-PS1-8), and 2) Use a model to illustrate the role of cellular division (mitosis) and differentiation in producing and maintaining complex organisms. (HS-LS1-4).

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will feel prepared to incorporate a nuclear radiology problem-based learning activity (developed by a radiologist and science teacher team) into their own classrooms!

SPEAKERS:
Peter Gunderman (Radiologist), Tina Ahmadi (PhD Student: Indianapolis, IN)

You Don't Know It Until You Can Explain It!

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Big Joe Turner A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1xYn73KlvWbyJ39Pxa6fwHQZN5rEmBVOvfc5tHOrLVq0/edit?usp=sharing
Presentation slides from KC NSTA 2023 Conference including library on resources on the last slide for video modeling pieces, reflection sheet docs, and exemplar videos.
Video Modeling Slides (includes library of resources on last slide)

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

In this hands-on workshop, you will engage in an "assessment FOR learning" activity called Video Modeling. Video Modeling is a teaching technique developed at the intersection of multiple goals: (1) for students to build a strong foundation in disciplinary core ideas (DCIs) while engaging in 3-D learning, (2) to have students cooperatively & actively explain concepts, but to do so as a formative assessment that welcomes failure and reflection, and (3) to have students develop more ownership and agency along with SEL skills. Participants will understand the learning research Video Modeling is designed from, participate in the activity "as students", and see reflections, strategies, and action research from my experience of teaching and revising this method throughout my teaching career.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers can add to their toolbox an "assessment for learning" framework that can be employed with any DCI from any content area to support student engagement in the scientific practices and crosscutting concepts.

SPEAKERS:
Thomas Wolfe (Adlai E. Stevenson High School: Lincolnshire, IL)

Using Societal Challenges as Phenomena in 3-D Units to Develop Student Agency

Saturday, October 28 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 F


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The Framework for K-12 Science Education and NGSS calls for learning that is grounded in real world phenomena and problems to ensure that science learning is relevant to all students. The BSCS Anchored Inquiry Learning (AIL) instructional model succeeds the 5Es and utilizes complex and culturally relevant societal challenges to anchor multiple cycles of inquiry and sensemaking, culminating with student explanations/design solutions. AIL employs science education research emphasizing coherence from students’ perspective. In this session, participants will: 1) consider their own ideas about teaching complex societal challenges, 2) experience 3-D learning and sensemaking strategies and consider the science concepts of a societal challenge (e.g., antibiotic resistance, heart disease, food sustainability, anthropogenic changes to biodiversity), and 3) consider how using societal issues as anchoring phenomena and problems can motivate students and develop agency in addressing complex issues.

TAKEAWAYS:
The research-based BSCS Anchored Inquiry Learning instructional model succeeds the 5Es and leverages complex societal issues as anchoring phenomena/problems, culminating tasks, and performance assessments in 3-D units of instruction to motivate students and develop agency in addressing these issues.

SPEAKERS:
Nancy Hopkins-Evans (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO), Cynthia Gay (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO)

Let's Talk ELL: Strategic Language Development in the Science Classroom

Saturday, October 28 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2206


Show Details

Due to the high influx of ELL students we have on our campus, we have come up with different systems and programs used in our classrooms, and our strategic after school tutoring for ELL students. Not only are students not able to speak the language, but come to us with large gaps in their education. The strategies created address both content and academic vocabulary. It has been shown ELL students are able to understand content language, but struggle with academic language. Hands on activities will be demonstrated using images to help students obtain language proficiency for both content and academic language. These strategies have been used the past two years, and have increased ELL test passing percentage by 40%.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will be able to take the strategies modeled during this workshop and incorporate them into their lessons or tutoring sessions. Written handouts will accompany the modeling of the strategies during this workshop.

SPEAKERS:
Briana Harry (Skyline High School: No City, No State)

Food Science Literacy- A Real World Application in the Classroom

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 1501 C


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

This is an overview of the farm-to-table process through the FDA. Labs are written so that the level of literacy is equitable to the grade span for which it is written. Grade levels 5-12 are included in the curriculum and NGSS standards included. The curriculum spans biology, chemistry, physical science, environmental science, and food and consumer science. It is written free of bias so that all students regardless of their life experiences can relate science to everyday food safety and nutrition. Food safety and nutrition will be discussed, curriculum links, methods, and activities to bring real-world knowledge into the classroom will be shared. Ideas for incorporating lessons as well as the literacy standards linking reading nonfiction topics in the science classroom will be addressed. Three classroom activities using beef, milk and salt will be demonstrated to show connections with science literacy standards.

TAKEAWAYS:
Students will: 1. be introduced to the fundamentals of microbiology while, at the same time, identifying important public health information through literature and hands-on learning activities; 2. learn about the label, and that nutrition not only aids in general well-being.

SPEAKERS:
Leanne Thele (Perryville High School: , MO), Tiska Rodgers (Clarkton High School: Clarkton, MO)

Engaging Students in Healthy Choices- Nutrition and Dietary Supplements

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 F


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

How do you teach students to make healthy food choices? Learn some simple hands-on activities that teach students how to understand the Nutrition Facts label to help them to make better choices when eating at home and when dining out. Content is based on the free FDA curriculum: Science and Our Food Supply: Using the Nutrition Facts Label to Make Healthy Food Choices Teachers will leave with the tools to help them teach nutrition activities, as well as learn about the newest FDA curriculum, Science and Our Food Supply: Examining Dietary Supplements. Learn how dietary supplements are defined and regulated so you can arm students with the knowledge to avoid dangers and make wise choices. Participants will engage in activities about the physiological effects of caffeine on the body. We will also look at resources to teach students about supplements banned by athletic organizations. Presenters will share with participants exciting opportunities for free professional development.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn about fun hands-on labs and activities to engage students in the science of nutrition and dietary supplements, how to use free FDA resources to teach about healthy food choices, and how to engage students in activities about the psychological effects of caffeine on the body.

SPEAKERS:
Susan Hartley (Hinkley High School: Aurora, CO)

Nourish the Future: Energy and Biofuels

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 1501 C


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Students utilize different components (enzymes, yeast, feed stocks, water] to produce ethanol and carbon dioxide through fermentation. Students develop a model and explain how ethanol is made to answer the focus question: "How can fermentation produce a renewable fuel source?" Students develop experimental models to generate data to construct explanations about relationships between components of the fermentation process and to predict how they can be manipulated to produce carbon dioxide. Students will design solutions to make the fermentation process as efficient as possible and generate the maximum amount of ethanol in a small bag environment. Participants will deconstruct a model of starch to examine enzyme and starch reactions to determine how starches change into smaller molecules. Attendees will participate in numerous hands-on activities centered around biofuel.

TAKEAWAYS:
Nourish the Future is a national education initiative developed by science teachers for science teachers to connect students to modern agriculture and provide sound science-based resources that meet teacher and student needs in the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Leanne Thele (Perryville High School: , MO), Tiska Rodgers (Clarkton High School: Clarkton, MO)

Charting the Course with uBEATS (a FREE Interactive STEM Resource)

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2503 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
uBEATS Module Sample Lesson Plans
uBEATS PowerPoint Presentation

STRAND: Tech Tools

Show Details

Content for our presentation includes: Opening-Introduction, History and Background of uBEATS, Highlights of the Program, Standards Alignment to NGSS and NCHSE, and a Canvas course walk-through Activity-In this activity portion, we will be taking a “Deep Dive” into uBEATS. We will preview a selected sample Freshman biology unit (Cellular Biology) and show specific modules that could be integrated into that unit of study (Cellular Structure and Function, Mitosis, and Cancer). The modules used in this preview will provide two different interactive activities that we will complete together while viewing them in the module. These modules will provide a review of core content, provide an extension to the core content, and bring in a career connection (Careers in Medical Imaging and Therapeutic Sciences). Closing-Register, Module Preview, social media, Podcast

TAKEAWAYS:
In this session, attendees will walk away with a clear understanding of what uBEATS is, how to effectively use this resource, and be fully prepared for implementation in their classrooms.

SPEAKERS:
Zuzi Greiner (Instructional Technologist)

Integrating Food Safety and Biotechnology into your Science Classroom

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 1501 C


STRAND: STEM Haven

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Presenters will share the FREE FDA curriculum, Science and Our Food Supply: Investigating Food Safety from Farm to Table. Participants will learn about labs that are easy to conduct in the classroom, to teach students the SCIENCE behind why we wash our hands, avoid cross contamination, cook foods to the appropriate temperatures and use pasteurization. They will also learn about the most common food borne pathogens by creating their own booklet with stickers of bacteria to match the pathogens involved in foodborne illnesses. Teachers will look at the FDA’s curriculum: Exploring Food Agriculture and Biotechnology. Participants will engage in an activity regarding how new cultivars of produce are developed. They will gain the knowledge to lead their students through activities involving genetic engineering practices that affect our food supply. Presenters will also share with participants exciting free professional development opportunities.

TAKEAWAYS:
You will learn how to access the FDA’s FREE curriculum; ways to incorporate Food Safety and Biotechnology into your everyday curriculum, and about FREE. There will be asynchronous professional development opportunities.

SPEAKERS:
Susan Hartley (Hinkley High School: Aurora, CO)

Integrating Nature-Inspired Invention and Engineering into the Biology Classroom through Case-Based Learning

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 F


STRAND: STEM Haven

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Case, project-based, and invention education lessons for high school students provide context for the learner through real-world scenarios that engage students in inventing while teaching NGSS cross-cutting concepts, scientific processes, engineering, and design. Participants in this workshop will learn how to engage students in nature-inspired invention, engineering, and intellectual property protection through a transdisciplinary lesson about the invention of Velcro. Biological systems and evolutionary adaptations inspire innovations and inventions that spark inventors to solve complex human problems. Participants will learn how to engage their students in creating nature-inspired inventions using resources provided by the US Patent and Trademark Office.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn how to integrate engineering design with biological concepts through nature-inspired invention and transdisciplinary learning by implementing case, project-based, and invention education.

SPEAKERS:
Jorge Valdes (U.S. Patent and Trademark Office: Alexandria, VA), Reginald Duncan (U.S. Patent and Trademark Office: Alexandria, VA), Kathy Hoppe (STEMisED, Inc: No City, No State)

PLTW's Immersive Learning on Roblox: New Tools to Create Enduring Understandings Through Play

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2505 A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
https://www.pltw.org/about/news/pltw-announces-pathogen-patrol-learning-experience-on-roblox

STRAND: Tech Tools

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Pathogen Patrol is a gamified learning experience created by Project Lead The Way (PLTW) and Tipping Point Media on the Roblox platform. This immersive classroom learning experience is designed to teach students about the human immune system's response to infections. Students are transformed into one of five different white blood cell types, and they must work with other players to protect the host from invading pathogens. The experience combines fun and engaging gameplay with applied learning, building students' problem-solving skills, critical thinking, and enduring understandings of the human body and its response to infection. PLTW believes that Roblox is the perfect platform to engage students in deep learning that builds the same transportable skills they develop in the classroom. In this workshop, teachers will be transported into virtual human hosts and experience stealth learning experience how stealth learning can create deep understanding of complex systems.

TAKEAWAYS:
Well-designed immersive learning experiences can engage students and create deep learning opportunities through repeated gameplay.

SPEAKERS:
Sheila Robles (Instructional Developer: , TX), Taylor Puett (Project Lead The Way, Inc.: Indianapolis, IN), Jason Rausch (SVP of Programs: Indianapolis, OK)

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