2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

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FILTERS APPLIED:STEM Share-a-Thon, STEM Haven, Biology

 

Rooms and times subject to change.
7 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Science in Our Community: An Interdisciplinary STEM Unit on Viruses, Wastewater, and Public Health

Saturday, October 28 • 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Share-a-thon Area


STRAND: STEM Haven | STEM

Show Details

Part of an NIH Initiative, participants will engage in an interdisciplinary, phenomenon-based high school science unit composed of six 3-D lessons. Aligned with the NGSS, the lessons focus on viruses, wastewater, and public health, and aims to support students in making informed decisions about science.

TAKEAWAYS:
Engage in a series of interdisciplinary 3-D lessons on science, technology, and public health using relevant phenomena like COVID-19, water quality, & wastewater treatment. All supporting documents and activities will be shared with the participants. Examples of student artifacts will be showcased.

SPEAKERS:
Sahar Alameh (University of Kentucky: Lexington, KY)

Online Preliminary Course Could Increase Engagement and Retention for Incoming General Biology and Anatomy Undergraduate Students

Saturday, October 28 • 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Share-a-thon Area


Show Details

Throughout teaching Anatomy and Physiology (A&P) and General Biology, students often face academic challenges surrounding these two foundational courses. One intended method to overcome these challenges is to implement a preliminary online course that students can complete before starting the academic year. Attendees will discuss how to design their own preliminary online course through an interactive workshop (in electronic and hard-copy formats) with group-based activities (e.g., discussions and demos) for any college-level biology course. We will also demonstrate various methods and assessments (e.g., recorded videos, quizzes, virtual escape rooms) best suited for students who choose to take the prep course, through our findings at our current college. A sample of our current preliminary online courses can be found via this link: https://sites.google.com/springfieldcollege.edu/bioprepcoursessc/general-biology-online-course

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn about our experience using a preliminary online course for undergraduates. Attendees will then learn how to design their own prep courses focusing on what students require in general biology and anatomy.

SPEAKERS:
Gemma Bartha (Instructor: Springfield, MA)

The ASSET Program (Advancing Secondary Science Education through Tetrahymena)

Saturday, October 28 • 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Share-a-thon Area


Show Details

Children are naturally inquisitive about the world around them. ASSET activities nurture that innate curiosity by engaging students in an interactive, hands-on exploration of the world of biology using safe, easily manipulated live Tetrahymena. Each module introduces students to a core biological concept using an interactive approach that involves scientific observation, manipulation of experimental materials, and evaluation of results. Each module is a stand-alone unit that comes with information relating the content to core concepts and, and is supported by an equipment lending library that can provide teachers at under-resourced schools with the materials needed to carry out the modules. Comprehensive teacher guides and detailed student handouts are provided for each module to facilitate classroom implementation.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will be introduced to ASSET and will conduct modified lab activities to see how ASSET can be used in the classroom to address topics like microscope use, cell parts and processes (phagocytosis & osmolarity), and the effects of smoking, vaping, and alcohol on living cells.

SPEAKERS:
Courtney Hausner (Teacher), Anne Deken (Forsyth School: St Louis, MO), Alexandra Forgerson (Instructional Specialist: University City, MO)

Cutting Through the Chemistry of CRISPR Cas-9.

Saturday, October 28 • 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Share-a-thon Area


Show Details

The unique nature of this presentation leverages the extensive knowledge and experience of both a chemistry and a biology educator (who is also a research scientist) to show how teachers can use biotechnologies, such as DNA Fingerprinting and CRISPR Cas-9, to motivate student exploration while expanding their chemistry knowledge and inspiring them to pursue research. This topic is particularly important because CRISPR Cas-9 is at the forefront of medical breakthroughs such as CAR-T cell cancer treatments and gene therapy. Unfortunately, this topic has not yet been used to its full potential in the classroom. This presentation will raise awareness among teachers of how to explain and utilize biotechnologies in various ways. Specifically, this session will show how to use chemistry to explain CRISPR Cas-9 while emphasizing the six elements of life, functional groups, and macromolecules (using hands-on molecular models) to leverage sense making to explain these complex processes.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how to excite students to learn and apply the chemistry necessary to understand the latest breakthroughs in biotechnology such as DNA Fingerprinting and CRISPR Cas-9. This presentation will showcase the crosscutting concept of systems and system models.

SPEAKERS:
Susan Allison (Dawson Education Service Cooperative: Arkadelphia, AR), Patrycja Krakowiak (Biology Instructor: Hot Springs, AR)

Free Resources to Resolve Scientific Misconceptions in Evolution and Climate Change

Saturday, October 28 • 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Share-a-thon Area


Show Details

For the purposes of the STEM Share-a-Thon, NCSE will have two mini-stations set up to provide quick, meaningful previews of our evolution and climate change lessons. We will have a variety of student and teacher handouts ready to take home for immediate use in the classroom, and a variety of SWAG to help spread the word about scientific literacy and our evidence-based approach to NGSS storylining. The National Center for Science Education's mission is to ensure all students have access to a sound science education, regardless of societally contentious regional topics like evolution and climate change. Our lessons were developed for teachers by teachers and have been extensively field-tested over the past three years. As we are a non-profit organization, all our resources are free. For more information, and to check out the variety of lessons we will have available at the Share-a-Thon, go here: https://ncse.ngo/supporting-teachers/classroom-resources.

TAKEAWAYS:
Scientific literacy and critical analysis of verified evidence are more important than ever in the secondary classroom. NCSE has developed lessons to resolve common misconceptions encountered online and through social media. All resources are free, NGSS-aligned, and readily available online.

SPEAKERS:
Blake Touchet (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA), Lin Andrews (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA)

What Science Standards and Science Content Look Like If We Take Inclusion Seriously

Saturday, October 28 • 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Share-a-thon Area



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Article: Framing and determining science content and standards for cultural repr
Visibility In STEM
YouTube Channel: Visibility In STEM

Show Details

This presentation disperses the published findings of the science standards and science content research for including the lived experiences and narratives of African American Gullan/Geechee and Black heritage, and situates the lived experiences and narratives of Black people in the science curriculum content. The author has created lessons and implemented these by looking at the pre- and post- changes in students’ understandings of the nature of science. This particular presentation shares and unpacks these science standards and provides resources that can be used to carry out these activities. Multimedia products have been used as an engaging context to lead inquiry explorations using best practices in science education pedagogy, such as argumentation. This work provides takeaways that bridge theory and practice in science education. For example, framing includes, but is not limited to, Universal Design for Learning (UDL) and Understanding by Design to show the thinking and rationale.

TAKEAWAYS:
Practical inclusive science standards that benefit all and considers best practices in science education pedagogy. A different way of thinking about inclusion by considering how we approach the science content and what science content is included.

SPEAKERS:
Catherine Quinlan (Howard University)

"H-Two-Poo": Contextualizing High School Science Through Wastewater Testing and Public Health

Saturday, October 28 • 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Share-a-thon Area


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

In this session, participants will experience part of an NGSS-aligned unit on wastewater testing and COVID-19. This six-lesson unit utilizing the 5E learning approach was developed through the collaboration of educators, engineers, scientists, medical doctors, and public health experts within an NIH-funded project. Attendees will participate in the fourth lesson of the sequence, entitled “H-Two-Poo.” Participants will first test the quality of different water samples to answer the driving question “how do you know if water is safe to use?” Participants will then learn about sources of wastewater, methods of wastewater management, and the development of a wastewater testing protocol to detect the presence of COVID-19. The experiences of high school students and teachers who have participated in the implementation of this phenomenon-based unit will be shared, including data from student surveys and handouts, along with photos of field trips to the community wastewater treatment facility.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will utilize science and engineering practices to collect and analyze water quality data. They will further learn how science and engineering have been used to develop wastewater testing techniques that inform public health decisions in our communities.

SPEAKERS:
Sagan Goodpaster (University of Kentucky: Lexington, KY)

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