2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

All sessions added to My Agenda prior to this notice have been exported to the mobile app and will be visible in your account when the app launches. Any sessions added now, will also have to be added in the app.
Grade Level


Topics
























Strands











Session Type














Pathway/Course














FILTERS APPLIED:9 - 12, Presentation, STEM Haven, Earth

 

Rooms and times subject to change.
16 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Radio Astronomy in the STEM Classroom - A daytime activity!

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Jay McShann B


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

This lesson focuses on radio astronomy data collected with a $50 student-built telescope. The telescope is not needed to do the lesson. Students collect information on the locations of neutral hydrogen. Easy to do and a primary focus of radio astronomy. The data collected can be used in the classroom to teach lessons on the Doppler Effect, Wave behavior, galactic velocity curves, and effects of gravity as well as other science topics. Many physics concepts can be taught in a highly engaging way by studying the concepts found in astronomy. Doppler effect, rotational motion, wave behavior, the EM spectrum are examples. The challenges to doing such lessons is the high cost of the telescopes and the challenges of collecting astronomy data during daylight hours. Plans for building and operating the radio telescope will be provided. Lesson plans for teaching the Doppler Effect via Red Shift/Blue Shift and for teaching how to work with galactic velocity curves will be included.

TAKEAWAYS:
Radio astronomy is done during class time as radio wave detection is not affected by daylight. Students will learn about the unique nature of galactic rotational behavior as compared to circular motion and planetary motion under Kepler’s Laws.

SPEAKERS:
John Clark (Volusia Online Learning: Port Orange, FL)

TikTok: Using Social Media to Build Relationships and Teach Content

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Big Joe Turner B


STRAND: Tech Tools

Show Details

TikTok is all the rage, and student spend a large amount of time on TikTok. Because of this, students do not always like traditional methods of receiving information (notes, lectures, demonstrations, labs). Additionally, according to Pew Research, 26% of 18-29 years old get their news (whether accurate or inaccurate) on TikTok. This number is probably higher for younger ages. Because students spend so much time on TikTok, they are used to getting short (less than 1 min) snippets of information in an engaging environment. In order to better serve our students, educators need to know how to use TikTok to their advantage to inform students. Tiktok can be used to share information with students (as photos or videos) and can serve as a great tool for formative and summative assessments (i.e.: students sharing information about their experimental results, taking polls, analyzing other TikTok's for their educational value).

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how to use TikTok for educational purposes; including disseminating information to students via TikTok and using TikTok as a formative and summative assessment tool for high school and post-secondary students.

SPEAKERS:
Kelsey Mescher (Battle High School: Columbia, MO), Stephanie Coyle (Jefferson Middle School: Columbia, MO)

Johns Hopkins Wavelengths Lessons: Connecting Secondary Students to Cutting Edge Science

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 C


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

This session will introduce participants to a lesson designed to introduce high school students to cutting-edge research on planetary science. The lesson is designed around the critical aspects of sensemaking: students experience a phenomenon, engage in science and engineering practices, and share ideas to build and/or apply disciplinary core ideas and crosscutting concepts needed to explain how or why the phenomenon occurs. Sensemaking is in the vision of A Framework for K-12 Science Education -- “the doing of science and engineering is highlighted as a strategy that can capture students’ interest in science and motivate their continued study.” (A Framework for K-12 Science Education, pp 42-43). JHU Wavelengths lessons co-designed by NSTA and Johns Hopkins University provide opportunities for all students to engage in science learning that is meaningful to them.

TAKEAWAYS:
The Johns Hopkins Wavelengths lesson introduced in the session provides opportunities for secondary students to learn about cutting-edge planetary science research and figure out science ideas related to earth and space science, and physical science.

SPEAKERS:
Patrice Scinta (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

How to Use NOAA Data: A Guide for Educators

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Julie Lee



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NOAA Data Presentation

Show Details

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) collects hundreds of terabytes of data daily from satellites, buoys, weather stations, animal tags, and more. Though that may sound intimidating, much of this data is readily available to teachers and can be used in the classroom to teach about our natural world. Using scientific data in the classroom can be a great way for teachers to motivate students and for students to learn inquiry-based methods using real-world data. This presentation will highlight many of NOAA’s standards-supported resources, how to access them, and strategies for using them in the classroom. NOAA data spans Earth, life, and physical sciences, and comes in a variety of formats ranging from raw unprocessed real-time measurements and satellite images to processed visualizations, graphs, charts, and animations. Many resources are ready-to-go so you can bring data into your classroom tomorrow!

TAKEAWAYS:
What types of data are available from NOAA and how to find and use NOAA data in your classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Kayla Smith (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration: Silver Spring, MD)

Teaching About Climate Tipping Points: The Latest Climate Science from the IPCC

Friday, October 27 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 E



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Wysession_NSTA_ClimateTipping_post.pdf
Slides on the latest scientific results from the IPCC and ideas on teaching about climate science in high school.

STRAND: Leadership and Advocacy

Show Details

An important and exciting focus of climate science addresses tipping points, which are non-linear reinforcing feedbacks within the climate system. Current climate research has identified at least a dozen different important climate tipping points that could possibly be triggered in the near future, with significant implications for human society; these include changes to glaciers, permafrost, ocean circulation, surface albedo, ocean acidity, and the biomass storage of carbon. This presentation will address what these tipping points are, why they are potentially dangerous, and how best to teach about them. The topic of climate tipping points aligns with several of the NGSS Earth and space science performance expectations and also strongly aligns with the NGSS CCC on the Stability and Change of systems. Ideas will be presented for phenomena and storylines addressing climate tipping points, which can be used in a chemistry, Earth science, environmental science, or physical science course.

TAKEAWAYS:
The subject of climate system tipping points is societally timely and important, and is an engaging topic for addressing NGSS several performance expectations in Earth and space science, and helping students understand the NGSS crosscutting concept of Stability and Change.

SPEAKERS:
Michael Wysession (Washington University in St. Louis: Saint Louis, MO)

Investigate and Analyze the Physical & Chemical Processes of Stellar Evolution Using NASA’s JS9 STEM Image Analysis Tools and Supporting Resources

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Julie Lee



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
https://chandra.si.edu/
https://universe-of-learning.org/home
SE RESOURCES Kansas City.pdf

STRAND: Tech Tools

Show Details

Stars form in clouds of gas and dust in star formation regions, and follow sequences that end in their destruction. Plotting their changing physical properties on the H-R diagram shows their evolutionary progress. Plotting light curves on the H-D diagram determines instability regions as stars transition to the next stage. Stellar evolution provides the energy which drives the universe and determines its future. Nucleosynthesis creates the elements which will enrich the next generation of protostars and planets. The resources developed by UoL are a progression from understanding astronomical images to plotting stellar transitions through instability strips on the H-R diagram, to analyzing observational data with the same JS9 tools that scientists use to determine everything from the chemical composition of supernovas to determining whether a stellar core is a white dwarf or a neutron star. The JS9 investigations include links to the original research papers and archived data sets.

TAKEAWAYS:
All our knowledge of stars and galaxies is determined by spectroscopy -- the analysis of radiation emissions, including radio, infrared, optical, ultraviolet, gamma, and X-ray. Knowledge of spectroscopy is essential to understanding the processes producing the individual wavelengths.

SPEAKERS:
Donna Young (NASA/NSO/UoL Program Manager: Laughlin, NV)

Global Change Meets NGSS: A Conceptual Framework for Teaching

Saturday, October 28 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Many scientists argue that we live in a new geological epoch – the Anthropocene – named because human activity has become the most powerful driver of global change. That sounds intriguing… but what does it actually mean? Which human activities are driving global change? What changes are these drivers causing? How do those changes affect the biosphere? Interestingly, answering these questions – even in a brief presentation that restricts the number of drivers of change to a handful – often seems to “take the edge off” ideological bias that stubbornly impedes communication about the significance of climate change and other global change phenomena. This approach is also more scientifically accurate than ascribing all threats to ecosystem functions and biodiversity exclusively to climate change. As global human population rises toward 9 billion, understanding the multiple ways that our activities affect the biosphere is essential for efforts to find a safe operating space for humanity.

TAKEAWAYS:
Human-biosphere interactions offer relevant narratives and conceptual frameworks that integrate cause and effect; systems and system models; structure and function; and stability and change.

SPEAKERS:
Joseph Levine (Science Writer and Producer: Concord, MA)

What Astronomers Actually Do

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2505 B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

This is a full tour of an astronomy research project done through NITARP (NASA Infrared Teachers Archive Research Program), which pairs Caltech astronomers with STEM teachers for authentic research using data from various observatories. The project presented here is a search for Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) in IC417 (the “Spider and Fly”) nebula. We’ll share how candidate objects were found, how object lists were generated and downloaded, how objects were identified and confidence values assigned. We’ll share how to make and interpret color-color plots, color-magnitude plots, spectral energy distribution plots and more. Most importantly, we’ll share how the astrophysics of star formation reveals itself in spectral data. And how confounding factors, such as dust in the interstellar medium, also show up in the data and can be compensated for. By attending this presentation, educators will be able to share a truer picture of the work of astronomers with their students.

TAKEAWAYS:
The participants will step through an entire astronomical research project from inception through data gathering, data vetting and processing, results, and publication. This will deepen the participant’s understanding of research and equip them to bring astronomical research to their school.

SPEAKERS:
Donna Kaiser (Stamford High School: Stamford, CT), Vincent Urbanowski (Academy of Information Technology & Engineering: Stamford, CT)

Helping Students Understand Changing Climates and Their Potential Socioeconomic Impacts

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 1501 A


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Changing global and local climates have perceptible impacts on communities, so teachers need to be able to develop lessons based on reliable date and research-based reports that their students can access and analyze to inform future decision-making. In this session, I will share some examples of use.

TAKEAWAYS:
Available climate data exists to be used in developing lesson plans to guide student decision-making.

SPEAKERS:
Michael Passow (Dwight Morrow HS (retd): Englewood, NJ)

Drilling for Stardust in the Ice Core Record, A.K.A. The Mystery of the Missing Supernova

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
https://chandra.si.edu/edu/
Ice Core Investigation Jamboard Version
Ice Core Records Kansas City.pdf
Ice Core Student Handout.pdf

STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

The GISP2 H-Core was collected in 1992 adjacent to the Greenland Ice Sheet Project Two (GISP2) drill site. The GISP2-H 125.6-meter firm and ice core is a record of 430 years of liquid electrical conductivity and nitrate concentrations. The liquid electrical conductivity sequence contains signals from a number of known volcanic eruptions that provide absolute dates. The terrestrial and solar background nitrate records show seasonal and annual variations and unique events. Several major nitrate anomalies within the record do not correspond to any known terrestrial or solar events, and there is compelling evidence that some nitrate anomalies within the GISP2 H-Core could be a record of supernova events. This investigation provides participants with a better understanding of the scientific process of analyzing data, developing models, constructing knowledge, and defending the results. Sometimes there is no answer key. This investigation is closely aligned with NGSS cross-cutting concepts.

TAKEAWAYS:
In constructing knowledge, there is no definitive answer, only plausible conclusions based on constructing, analyzing, and comparing data and research from multiple disciplines. This investigation provides a better understanding of the scientific process of developing models and defending results.

SPEAKERS:
Donna Young (NASA/NSO/UoL Program Manager: Laughlin, NV)

The Matter-Energy-Forces Triangle: A Common Approach to Make Sense of Physics, Chemistry, Biology, and Earth Science in OpenSciEd

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 H


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Many students experience high school science without considering the interconnectedness of different domains. By leveraging the Energy and Matter crosscutting concept and uniting this lens with a forces perspective, we consider how a Matter-Energy-Forces (MEF) triangle can help students apply core principles of physical science across multiple domains. We explore the MEF triangle’s use in three different units that highlight Earth and Space Science alongside Biology, Physics or Chemistry to make explicit connections to the crosscutting concept of energy and matter and core life and physical science Disciplinary Core Ideas. Examples include fires, polar ice melt, tectonic plate motion, and meteors. We also consider how this tool could be useful for students over the course of many units and how it can increase access to more difficult life and physical science concepts through the use of this routine. Participants will practice applying the MEF triangle to phenomena in their contexts.

TAKEAWAYS:
The Framework calls for “a common use of language about energy and matter across the disciplines in science instruction.” The MEF triangle uses cues and prompts to draw attention to interactions between matter, energy, and forces to help students make sense of complex phenomena across domains.

SPEAKERS:
Whitney Mills (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO), Jamie Noll (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO), Dan Voss (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Diego Rojas-Perilla (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO)

How About a Field Trip...to Mars?

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 1501 A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Links and resources
NSTA_2023.pdf
NSTA_2023.pptx

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Since the first interplanetary probes were launched, the data that have been returned by these probes have been both fascinating in the insight they have returned, but daunting in their sheer volume, making their use by classroom teachers limited. Yet engagement with planetary phenomena rarely cease to generate “wows” among students. A free software package, JMARS, allows GIS-based imagery and chemical data for planetary bodies to be accessed to address the questions of classroom-based investigations. This presentation will show how JMARS, coupled with the broad range of Mars rover photography (Spirit, Opportunity, Curiosity, and Perseverance) available online, can be used to design virtual field trips on Mars, and mesh with the NSTA Sensemaking framework by generating student questions about another planet, as if they were standing on it themselves. Attendees are encouraged to bring a laptop device and download the software appropriate to their computer at https://jmars.asu.edu/.

TAKEAWAYS:
Space exploration seems to be an abstract concept to many students, so placing them as close as possible to the available data, including not just images but chemical and physical information as well, allows them to gain a deeper understanding of Earth phenomena and processes.

SPEAKERS:
Eric Pyle (James Madison University: Harrisonburg, VA)

Solar Eclipse Education for All: Using the Double Eclipse to Help All Students Make Sense of a Rare Phenomenon

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2202



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Solar Eclipse Education for All
Powerpoint and activity documents

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

This presentation will focus on how our STEM education center educated students and the public about the upcoming solar eclipses. Presenters will share how the Center incorporated sensemaking through the phenomenon of solar eclipses by engaging students with the SEPs of modeling and constructing explanations. The outreach will primarily focus on standard MS-ESS1-1, but the goal of the outreach aligns with the goals of the Framework to educate all students in science and engineering and to provide foundational knowledge for our future scientists, engineers, technologists, and technicians. Attendees will engage in an activity that they can share with their classroom in order to safely view the 2024 solar eclipse, including the creation of a solar eclipse viewer. Presenters will also share teaching strategies that make use of modeling and online simulations for eclipses. Time will be included for participants to share their own ideas of effective solar eclipse teaching strategies.

TAKEAWAYS:
Educators will take away ideas for educating their classes about eclipses and ideas for educating the public on what causes eclipses and how to view them safely. This information will be a result of our STEM education center's eclipse outreach and its effectiveness.

SPEAKERS:
Alice Steimle (Director: University, MS), Christian Clark (University of Mississippi: University, MS)

Leveraging the Humanities to Increase Global Stewardship and Agency in the Earth Science Classroom

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Featured Works and Bibliography - Humanities and Climate Change

STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

The session will suggest ways in which to reach out of the science classroom and into the heart to connect climate science to the human factor of the climate crisis. Specific pieces of writing (fiction and essay), art, photography, poetry, music, and multimedia will be shared with audience members. These will be provided as examples of the science-humanities connection and how to leverage the emotions present in the work to underscore the severity of the climate crisis. The presentation will suggest entry points in the NGSS Standards to integrate the interdisciplinary approach. The session will also highlight artwork from diverse cultures, some of which will feel the impact of Climate Change earlier than industrialized nations (i.e. Marshallese or other Pacific Islanders). Resources and lists of potential works linked to Climate Change will be provided so attendees may select the works that would best connect to their unique student populations.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers can use writing, art, photography, poetry, and other forms of expressions from our global culture to supplement a student's scientific understanding of the potential and current effects of Climate Change. If you humanize the problem, advocacy follows.

SPEAKERS:
Peter Knutson (Department of Defense Education Activit;y: No City, No State)

Making Sense of NGSS Standards to Support Student Sensemaking

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 C


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

In this session, we will introduce teachers to a standards-unpacking document Kansas Department of Education is developing to provide teachers with unpacked standards and ideas to guide NGSS planning. Using appendices E (K-12 DCI), F (K-12 SEP), and G (K-12 CCC) from the NGSS Framework supports vertical alignment of each of the three dimensions which allows teachers to identify the grade-band aligned experiences that students need in order to reach the full level of the standard through three-dimensional sensemaking. We will use the tool to identify what is new and unique to the focus grade-band to ensure grade-level appropriate learning experiences and expectations. We will show teachers how the unpacked standard tool promotes using their own students’ interests and experiences to plan to incorporate local phenomenon as a key part of three-dimensional sensemaking. We will provide teachers with access to and/or copies of the standards unpacking tool.

TAKEAWAYS:
We share a tool used to unpack standards for foundational concepts & key experiences that students need to make sense of all three dimensions of a standard. Participants will be able to consider their own students’ interests and identities to plan to support sensemaking for their student population.

SPEAKERS:
Stephanie Alderman-Oler (Washington High School: Kansas City, KS), Sarah Evans (Olathe South High School: Olathe, KS)

High Altitude Ballooning to Engage All Students

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 1501 A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
205702main_Bag_Ballons.pdf
Activity to demonstrated bouyancy
balloon_program_fact_sheet_4 (1).pdf
balloon_science_science scope.pdf
Article on Balloon Science from Science Scope
buildasatellite_worksheet.pdf
Activity to aid in planning
Copy of tst1501_29 (1).pdf
Near Space Science - TST Article from Jan 15
HAB at HHS sample files.pdf
sample documents
HAB Training Videos (1).docx
Training Videos
jcst1402_26.pdf
Journal of College Science Teaching article on ballooning.]
NASA BEST Engineering Framework (1).pptx
A help for teaching engineering design
NASA_20230208_Workshop_scientific_balloons (1).pptx
An introductory Powerpoint on HAB
tst0801_37.pdf
Student's at the Edge of Space from TST

STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

The presentation will cover the basics of high-altitude ballooning as done at Fort Hays State University. Attendees will be introduced to the FHSU website that we use with school groups who contact us to help with their launch. These cover physics and chemistry involved in launching a balloon, the FAA rules, where to find materials, tracking and recovery systems, designing an experiment, and processing data. We will also introduce the teachers to the technology that can be flown to collect data which includes cameras, data loggers, and how to make and code data collection devices with Arduinos. The presentation will include information about NASA resources on high altitude ballooning. We will also share the high school curriculum developed by Shepherd-Adams that she uses in her classroom for an aeronautics CTE course. Examples of student projects and presentations will be presented. The project aligns with NGSS standards related to engineering, earth and space science, as well as physi

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn how to prepare and launch a high-altitude balloon that integrates science and engineering.

SPEAKERS:
Cheryl Shepherd-Adams (Teacher: Hays, KS), Paul Adams (Fort Hays State University: Hays, KS)

Back to Top