2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

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Shared Waters: A Classroom Ready Watershed Themed Curriculum for 3rd-7th Grade

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2206


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Participants in this session will be introduced to the Shared Waters curriculum, a classroom-ready, watershed-focused, 10-lesson unit. This presentation will provide attendees with a brief overview of the unit exploring overall content, learning goals, lesson resources, and the culminating student-driven action project. During the workshop, participants will engage in a hands-on activity that explores watershed boundaries and how pollution enters waterways via stormwater runoff. There will be a demonstration of pervious vs impervious surfaces and a showcase of an online learning tool titled 'runoff simulator' that connects the two activities. Finally, presenters will highlight the culminating student-centered action project and how the Shared Waters curriculum guides educators through the process with students. All participants will have free access to the Shared Waters curriculum, including all lesson plans, worksheets, and PowerPoint slides.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn more about this curriculum while participating in a hands-on watershed activity and demonstrations exploring pervious and impervious surfaces' connections to waterway health. We'll tie it all together with an easy-to-implement student-centered action project that can be completed in one day.

SPEAKERS:
Liz Fulton (Graduate Assistant: Millersville, PA)

Un-Cooking the Egg – Modeling Protein Structure and Denaturation

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 1501 C


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: 3D Molecular Designs

What happens when you cook an egg? Is it possible to un-cook it? Investigate the characteristics of amino acids, the levels (and rules!) of protein folding, and how denaturing a protein alters its function, in an engaging hands-on modeling investigation using the Amino Acid Starter Kit ©.

SPEAKERS:
Mark Arnholt (3D Molecular Designs: No City, No State)

Next Generation Dissection: Form, Function, and Frogs!

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2505 B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: Carolina Biological Supply Co.

With the transition to 3-dimensional learning and NGSS, is there still a place for dissections in the classroom? The answer is yes! As you dissect a frog, we will demonstrate how to integrate the 3 dimensions of learning while highlighting adaptations and the relationship between structure and function.

SPEAKERS:
Patricia Kopkau

It All Begins with Water

Thursday, October 26 • 10:50 AM - 11:50 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 1501 C


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: 3D Molecular Designs

Everything is dependent on water. Explore several properties of this remarkable compound with tried-and-true phenomena. Learn multiple ways to model those phenomena using the Water Kit©.

SPEAKERS:
Ruth Hutson (Blue Valley High/Middle School: Randolph, KS)

Selection Pressures and Urban Spaces: A Storyline Approach in OpenSciEd Biology

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Basie Ballroom A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

This unit helps students develop an understanding of the elements of evolution by natural selection and learn to apply that understanding to protect populations endangered by urbanization. Students learn through modeling, reading and discussing adaptations of published scientific studies of nonhuman populations impacted by urbanization. They develop criteria for designing urban systems that protect populations from the harmful effects of fragmentation in urban systems and evaluate proposals for development in a real US city.

TAKEAWAYS:
Leave motivated to use OpenSciEd’s storyline to teach the elements of evolution by natural selection using real-world examples. Students will learn how their understanding of biological concepts can be used to design more sustainable systems that benefit the human and more-than human world.

SPEAKERS:
Sara Krauskopf (University of Colorado-Boulder: No City, No State), Wayne Wright (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Kate Henson (University of Colorado Boulder: Boulder, CO)

I've Got Good News and Bad News: You're Warm-Blooded!

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Big Joe Turner A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Homeothermic, or warm-blooded, animals have several game-changing advantages compared to ectothermic, or cold-blooded creatures. Yet in the real world of Nature, nothing is free, and a price must be paid for these advantages. In order to supply all cells with oxygen and fuel, warm-blooded animals require an enormous blood supply and an efficient circulatory system with a 4-chambered heart at the center of it all. In this session, participants will work with research-generated data to build a mathematical model that allows them to estimate their own blood volumes. In addition, we will look at metabolic data comparing warm and cold-blooded animals, and the oxygen requirements of each. Finally, we will evaluate the food input requirements of warm-blooded animals in cold environments compared to warm environments.

TAKEAWAYS:
Being "warm-blooded" brings both good news and bad news for an animal. In this session, attendees will calculate their blood volume, why a 4-chambered heart is needed to move all that blood around, and how the circulatory system is the key to unlock all of these physiological phenomena!

SPEAKERS:
Jeffrey Lukens (Retired Science Teacher: Sioux Falls, SD)

Is Bigfoot Among Us? Follow the Evidence to Combat Pseudoscience

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Basie Ballroom B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Science is often portrayed as conducted in a simple linear way (i.e., the scientific method). But this is rarely true in actual scientific practice. Instead of a step-by-step series of actions, science is conducted more cyclically, with scientists working back and forth between pursuing exploration and discovery, assessing benefits and outcomes, and developing analysis and feedback. At the core of this process is evidence, against which ideas in science are constantly tested. Evidence is what drives all scientific understanding. By examining environmental DNA (eDNA) collected from areas where recent Bigfoot sightings have occurred, participants can provide students with a logical and rational way scientists can use evidence to dispel the pseudoscience of cryptozoology. Upon completing this activity, attendees can apply their new knowledge to how eDNA is currently used to identify viruses and diseases in wastewater. Resources: https://ncse.ngo/supporting-teachers/classroom-resources

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will explore and appreciate the importance of evidence to the scientific process by taking a deep dive into an NGSS storyline sequence developed to help students understand that science must be substantiated by multiple lines of evidence to be accepted by the scientific community.

SPEAKERS:
Blake Touchet (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA), Ericca Thornhill (Mizzou Academy: Columbia, MO), Lin Andrews (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA)

Exploring a Learning Sequence About Patterns in Species Diversity

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2501 D


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: Lab-Aids

Learning Sequences to drive phenomena through a unit is one way to help students understand the content. In this model activity from a new Lab-Aids program; Science and Global Issues: Biology, developed by SEPUP, you will use data to investigate how abiotic factors and species diversity are related.

Got Milk?: DNA, Enzymes, and Lactose Intolerance

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2505 B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: Carolina Biological Supply Co.

Participants use the lactase enzyme to produce lactose-free milk in an easy-to-perform lab and then modify experimental conditions to design and test their own procedures to maximize production of lactose-free milk.

SPEAKERS:
Laurie Nixon (Watauga High School: Boone, NC)

The Cell Game

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Mary Lou Williams



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
QR codes for website and presentations
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The Cell Building Game 2023.pdf
This is the presentation I'll be doing. Documents will be available at the presentation.

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Over the course of the last five years I have developed an engaging resource based card game to teach the cell. I grew disillusioned the projects and activities that we were currently doing as it didn't get to the heart of the parts of the cell. The Cell Game fixed that. In one class students compete to build different organelles that require resource cards. By having more organelles, your cell becomes more complex. The students LOVE the cell game and clamor to play it at lunch after being exposed to it. I'd love to share it with other teachers.

TAKEAWAYS:
Build a cell. Divide. Grow. Get excited about cell microbiology!

SPEAKERS:
Jason Zackowski (Science Curriculum Lead)

Act It Out: Visualizing Cellular Processes

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Big Joe Turner A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Action Potentials Infographic.png
Slides from the Act It Out Presentation

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The more senses we use when learning something, the better we are able to remember it, so in this session teachers will learn how to incorporate movement into their classes. Here are the activities we will do: 1) Modeling an action potential. The graph of an action potential looks a lot like a wave and so to help students remember this, we say the stages of the graph while we make a wave with our bodies (like in a stadium). Then students need to describe what is happening at the cellular level while their bodies are moving. 2) Modeling translation. Participants will be given supplies to take on the role of tRNAs, with anticodons and amino acids, and then show how they enter the ribosome through the A, P and E sites to undergo translation. 3) If time permits, we can also model a signal transduction pathway or DNA replication. 4) The last 15 minutes will be for groups to come up with one way they can incorporate movement and present this to the group.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn how to get your students up and moving as they use their bodies to act out cellular processes.

SPEAKERS:
Ilana Saxe (The Lawrenceville School: Lawrenceville, NJ)

Engaging All Students in the Science of Sustainable Food Systems

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Basie Ballroom B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Students and educators must remain connected to, and motivated by, the elements of their world that not only spark curiosity and generate wonder but are real. Students care deeply about the environment, climate change, food insecurity, and sustainability. A sustainable and resilient future will only be achieved if we begin to make sense of these challenges in smaller, coherent investigations; starting in our science classrooms. An enormous piece of the sustainability puzzle lies within sustainable food systems. Food production and agriculture provide limitless opportunities for students to explore phenomena among the interactions of living things and the earth’s systems. Further, the practice of agriculture, since its origins, has been a continuous series of design challenges to cultivate nature for the needs of humans. This presentation provides a lens through which students and educators can find opportunities to spark inquiry and solve real-world problems.

TAKEAWAYS:
Educators will see successful examples of authentic phenomena and problems found within food and agricultural systems that are relevant to all students. We will demonstrate how all three dimensions of NGSS are used to make sense of these real-world phenomena.

SPEAKERS:
John McNamara (Wash. State Academy of Sciences), Brian Beierle (Vivayic, Inc.: No City, No State)

Dynamic DNA: More Than Just A's, and T's, and C's, and G's

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 1501 C


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: 3D Molecular Designs

Examine how modeling deepens student engagement. Explore carefully designed models to discover basic features of DNA structure and function using an atomically accurate model. Model nucleotides, DNA and RNA polymers, genetic sequences, genetic engineering,...and epigenetics.

SPEAKERS:
Tim Herman (3D Molecular Designs: Milwaukee, WI)

Be a Genetic Counselor!

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Big Joe Turner A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Genetic Counselor Project Folder
This Google Drive folder has all of the materials for this project, including: the PDFs of the open access primary literature articles, teacher launch pad/key, student directions, sample presentation, the slides from the talk, an explanation of statistics and the project rubric. Please make sure to provide attribution to ilana saxe of The Lawrenceville School, thanks!

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

While not always the case, the experiences that students have had in middle school with genetics can be limited to plug and chug Punnett squares investigating traits in aliens, SpongeBob, and dragons. In an effort to help students see how patterns of inheritance and gene expression can be more nuanced than that and to connect to a real world example, I created a Genetic Counselor project for the 9th graders at The Lawrenceville School (Lawrenceville, NJ). In this session, participants will have the opportunity to work through aspects of the project, specifically creating the pedigree and working with primary literature and analyzing data. This project is great because it includes representation of people of different backgrounds and identities, is based in the real world, introduces students to a career path, and teaches about primary literature. Please see the project launch pad here: https://tinyurl.com/GCPNSTA --Thanks!

TAKEAWAYS:
Work through the genetic counselor project from a patient background, solving a pedigree, learning how to use NCBI, and interpreting primary literature. You will take home the student directions, exemplar projects, list of relevant primary literature articles, and teacher key.

SPEAKERS:
Ilana Saxe (The Lawrenceville School: Lawrenceville, NJ)

Exploring Symbiosis: Parasitoid Wasps

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2102 B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Symbiosis and Other Relationships is a multimedia curriculum module that uses a three-part symbiosis between a wasp, its caterpillar host, and a virus to highlight the varied and sometimes complex ecological relationships. It includes an opportunity for students to analyze data through a simulated experiment, interweaving this example with more general information. Students learn about competition, predation, parasitism, commensalism, and mutualism through examples of 2-way relationships, and tease out the types of relationships at play in examples of 3-way relationships. The module’s materials can be used independently to supplement existing curriculum materials, or used alone in a suggested sequence over 1-2 weeks of class time. Workshop Outcomes • Where to access a free NGSS-friendly, multimedia middle school curriculum module on ecological relationships. • Teasing apart 2-way and 3-way ecological relationships reveals a number of strategies organisms employ to survive.

TAKEAWAYS:
How to access and use a free module that includes an opportunity for students to analyze data through a simulated experiment involving the wasp parasitoid and its host, interweaving this example with more general information in a way that builds an understanding of complex ecological relationships.

SPEAKERS:
Molly Malone (The University of Utah: Salt Lake City, UT)

Inspiring Curiosity with Wildlife Cams

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2209


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Live-streaming wildlife cams give students an intimate view into the amazing and diverse world of animals and allow teachers to engage all students in inquiry- and phenomena-based learning as nature unfolds in real-time and with unknown outcomes. Wildlife cams encourage questioning and curiosity, build connections to wildlife and nature, and are interesting to teachers and students alike. Cams engage students who have fewer opportunities to be immersed in nature, including those in urban settings, with mobility challenges, and in remote learning environments. I will guide teachers through a series of questions to help them determine good live-streaming cams to use in their classrooms. I’ll discuss different ways to use cameras within the classroom, including active and passive usage. I’ll share how we use cams to make observations and they will draw their own comics as we watch a live-streaming cam.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will discover a variety of wildlife cams from around the world, explore how they can be used to effectively develop student science practices, and discover free resources to support science learning through wildlife cams.

SPEAKERS:
Susan Licher (Cornell Lab of Ornithology: Ithaca, NY)

It’s All in the Genes—Exploring Mendelian and Non-Mendelian Inheritance Through Modeling

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 1501 C


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: 3D Molecular Designs

Help direct student questions towards investigation and modeling several types of inheritance with the Chromosome Connection Kit©. Construct Punnett squares with gene sequences as alleles to connect the inheritance of traits to chromosomes at the molecular level.

SPEAKERS:
Ruth Hutson (Blue Valley High/Middle School: Randolph, KS)

uHandy Mobile Microscope

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 1501 B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: Aidmics Biotechnology

This workshop supports teachers to implement inquiry-based science learning and helps students to develop meaningful scientifically literate views of the world by using the uHandy Microscope that acts as your second pair of eyes, which ignites your curiosity and your genuine passion for science!

SPEAKERS:
Jolanda Hsu (Aidmics Biotechnology: Taipei City, Taipei City)

Water, Water Everywhere, But How Did it Get in There? -- Modeling the Movement of Water and Ions Across Cell Membranes

Friday, October 27 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 1501 C


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: 3D Molecular Designs

Participants will model the aspects of water and ion transport across cell membranes using the Phospholipid and Membrane Transport Kit © and our MIGHTY Model © Channel collection. 3-D models of Na+ and K+ channel proteins and aquaporin will help your students understand cellular transport.

SPEAKERS:
Mark Arnholt (3D Molecular Designs: No City, No State)

Structure and FUNction! Organ Dissection for Next Generation Teachers

Friday, October 27 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2505 B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: Carolina Biological Supply Co.

Dissect several mammalian organs and explore links between anatomy and physiology. Examine real-world examples while connecting structure with function of engaging organs including the cow eye, sheep heart, and bull testicle. Use these workshop objectives to bolster your 3-dimensiona instruction.

SPEAKERS:
Patricia Kopkau

Building Depth Through Storylines: Why Can’t We Walk Through Walls?

Friday, October 27 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2505 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: Savvas Learning Company

N/A

SPEAKERS:
Christopher Moore (University of Nebraska Omaha: Omaha, NE)

Equitable Discussions of Nature-Culture Relationships: OpenSciEd Biology

Friday, October 27 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 F



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Lesson 2 Reading
short framework_Nature_Culture_Relations_rev101321.pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

OpenSciEd Biology Units incorporate frameworks such as 5 Dimensions of Reasoning About Complex Socio-Ecological Systems developed by Learning in Places to support multiple Ways of Knowing and interacting with phenomena. These frameworks bring conversations about power and historicity into the classroom and help students consider multiple points of view when making decisions involving science. The Nature-Culture Relations framework helps students and educators identify the positionality of interest holders to explain different perspectives. Learn how these frameworks are incorporated into biology units.

TAKEAWAYS:
Recognize your own positionality in nature-culture relations and think about how to bring this framework to your students.

SPEAKERS:
Sara Krauskopf (University of Colorado-Boulder: No City, No State), DeAnna Lee Rivers (University of Colorado Boulder: No City, No State)

Sustaining the Commons

Friday, October 27 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2501 D


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: Lab-Aids

In this interactive workshop from our new Biology program from SEPUP, students will engage with a model of how human choices affect the sustainability of a particular resource—the fish population of a fictitious lake—and the potential effects of various actions.

Introducing Mighty Models: From Water Channels to Action Potentials

Friday, October 27 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 1501 C


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: 3D Molecular Designs

Experience our new collection of protein models enhanced by molecular stories, digital resources, and augmented reality technology. Bigger, better… and more robust.

SPEAKERS:
Tim Herman (3D Molecular Designs: Milwaukee, WI)

Exploring the Arthropods in Your Area Through the Lens of Classification and Taxonomy

Friday, October 27 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

In this poster session, educators will have the opportunity to learn about ways to get students outside and learning about the native arthropods in their area. This 2-4 day project allows students to research, collect, and identify different arthropods in their environment. Students will practice and show their understanding of these arthropods by designing and presenting their own phylogenic tree while connecting it back to their native environment.

TAKEAWAYS:
Come learn about how to engage your students in the environment around them through the lens of classification and taxonomy.

SPEAKERS:
Jacqueline Svetich (Science Teacher: Naperville, IL)

Bringing the Complexities of Virus Structure to Life Through Origami and 3-D Printing

Friday, October 27 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA Poster Presentation 2023 .pptx

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

A really fun component of my virology course is virus structure. The first time I taught the class ('21), I gave the students a guided tutorial on how to build a viral capsid using very fancy online software. Students really enjoyed this activity, however, they found difficulty understanding the different axes of symmetry that viruses use to create a capsid shell. Therefore, during the second iteration of the course ('22), I created a paper-based icosahedron (a typical shape that viruses use) folding activity so students could orient themselves with a model before doing the more complex online computational building component. This was such a hit that I am currently working on a case study for publication with a student on this activity in particular. For the third iteration of the course ('23), students printed 3-D models of their viruses that truly enhanced learning for this work. I would present overviews of the activities as well as detail the progression of the course.

TAKEAWAYS:
In an effort to facilitate a complete understanding of viral 3-D structure for the development of antivirals and vaccines, students conduct origami paper-folding activities as well as 3-D printing to complement the more rigorous computational methods used in the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Lawrence Tartaglia (Teaching Assistant Professor: Bethlehem, PA)

All in the Family: The Story of Human Evolution

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Jay McShann A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Although there is no shortage of potential phenomena for teaching about the process of evolution, using human evolution is a sure way to make the topic relevant and engaging for all students. It is also an excellent way to address some of the most common student misconceptions surrounding the subject, such as “humans evolved from monkeys,” “if humans evolved from apes, why are there still apes?” and “humans are the pinnacle of the tree of life and therefore no longer evolving like other organisms.” By examining a wide range of evidence, including different potential variations of hominid skulls (physical replicas, cards, or 3D digital models), geographic data, artifacts, and climate trends, students will be able to piece together a model of hominid phylogeny and learn about the changes in anatomy, behavior, and distribution that led to our unique human features. Resources: https://ncse.ngo/supporting-teachers/classroom-resources

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will explore a range of paleoanthropology evidence to confidently guide students through one of the most engaging evolutionary phenomena – human evolution. Learn about extinct hominid groups and how they are connected to human origins through features, behaviors, and relationships.

SPEAKERS:
Blake Touchet (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA), Lin Andrews (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA)

Whey Protein can be Legen'dairy' in the Classroom

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Big Joe Turner A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

I will be presenting a short storyline I created. It incorporates the phenomena that whey protein comes from cows. Whey protein is a "buzz" item lately with the workout craze, workout supplements, etc. Throughout the storyline, students will make connections with proteins, dairy (cows), other macromolecules, and homeostasis. Students will learn how to make cheese and that the by-product is whey protein. They will test various workout supplements and health foods for macromolecules. They will learn about homeostasis: positive and negative feedback loops through working out (heart rate and breathing rates). Lastly, they will complete a project where they have to figure out which proteins are best for the human body and then create a product and it's packaging (i.e. protein bar, shake, drink, etc). Teachers will get to experience some of the labs and receive all of the paper resources to take back and implement the storyline or parts of the storyline in their classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
If you have never used storylines, this is a great short one you can try in your class. You will leave this session with beneficial resources you can take back and use in your Biology classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Erin Snelling (Hallsville High School: Hallsville, MO)

Experiencing Science by Using Scientific Theater

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Colonial Ballroom



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
AP Biology Theater Evolution Edition.docx
Biology Theater AP Ecology Edition.docx
Biology Theater Cell Signaling Edition.docx
Biology Theater Molecular DNA edition.docx
Chem Theater Example #1.pdf
Chem Theater Example #2.pdf
Chem Theater Example #3.pdf
Chem Theater Example #4.pdf
Chemistry Theater Acids and Bases AP Edition.docx
Chemistry Theater Acids and Bases.docx
Chemistry Theater AP Solutions Edition.docx
Chemistry Theater Bonding.docx
Instructions for Chemistry Theater NSTA.docx

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Scientific Theater might seem like an oxymoron, but over my decade-plus in high school education, it has become a favorite of my students. The goals of this experience are to encourage the attendees/students to be creative in trying to explain sometimes complicated concepts, and to realize that written words and slide presentations are not the only way to explain something. In this workshop, attendees will be given the opportunity to experience Scientific Theater exactly as my students do, by creating their own one-act play explaining a chemical concept. The concept may be one of their own choosing, or there will be several to choose from. After choosing, attendees will split into groups of four, at which point they will collaborate to develop and write a 3-minute play that they best feel illustrates their concept. At the end of the session, volunteer groups will be invited to perform, and it is hoped that the attendees will have seen theater as the powerful and enjoyable tool it is.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will collaborate to create their own plays to describe a scientific concept. After discussion and rehearsal, volunteers will be asked to perform their masterpieces in front of the group. By doing so, attendees will be able to take what they have learned back to their classrooms.

SPEAKERS:
Karen Flummerfelt (Downtown Magnets High School: Los Angeles, CA)

Enhancing Molecular Models with Augmented Reality (AR)

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 1501 C


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: 3D Molecular Designs

Physical models reveal the invisible molecular world, but can have limitations. Digital media can address these limitations, but is experienced separate from the models. With 3DMD AR, digital overlays appear directly onto the physical models, seamlessly combining the strengths of physical models and digital media.

SPEAKERS:
Mark Hoelzer (Director of Materials Development: Milwaukee, WI)

Making Sense of Cell Differentiation and Gene Expression

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2501 D


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: Lab-Aids

Explore the use of sensemaking strategies to help students understand how selective gene expression works. Come experience a model lesson from a new Lab-Aids program; Science and Global Issues: Biology, developed by SEPUP. This hands-on workshop will also show a connection to genetic engineering.

Developing Models Using Hands-On Science and Real Data

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2505 B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: Carolina Biological Supply Co.

Participants will examine how real data can be used to create conceptual models to drive understanding of complex concepts. Tree ring data will be used as an example of a line of evidence to support climate models and phenotype data are collected to create a conceptual model of inheritance patterns.

SPEAKERS:
Patricia Kopkau

Anchored Inquiry Learning: Designing Meaningful Instruction to Make Sense of Authentic Phenomena

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 F


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The Framework for K-12 Science Education and NGSS calls for 3-D learning grounded in authentic phenomena and problems to ensure relevant learning for all students. Instructional materials design helps achieve these synergistic goals and create meaningful classroom sensemaking and learning. The BSCS Anchored Inquiry Learning (AIL) instructional model succeeds the 5Es and utilizes authentic phenomena/problems to anchor multiple cycles of inquiry and sensemaking, culminating with student explanations/design solutions. AIL employs science education research emphasizing coherence from students’ perspective. In this session, participants will: 1) consider how AIL integrates elements of the 5E instructional model, NextGen Science storylines, and problem-based learning instructional models; 2) experience a sample lesson to deepen their understanding of the approach, and 3) consider their own education contexts and how they can apply AIL to design meaningful learning experiences for their students.

TAKEAWAYS:
The research-based BSCS Anchored Inquiry Learning instructional model succeeds the 5Es and leverages authentic phenomena/problems to anchor cycles of inquiry and sensemaking. This approach provides instructional coherence from students’ perspective, equitable access, and motivation for ALL learners.

SPEAKERS:
Nancy Hopkins-Evans (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO), Cynthia Gay (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO)

Using Cross Cutting Concept thinking to Engage in Life/Earth Science Phenomena in OpenSciEd Biology

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Basie Ballroom A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

OpenSciEd Biology units use a storyline approach to help students figure out answers to their questions in a three-dimensional, coherent, and equitable way. In this session, participants will experience that approach firsthand as they engage with the unit’s anchor in "student hat", experiencing the content as students do in the classroom. Participants will also explore ways to use strategic questioning and the development and use of different models for complex phenomena to encourage students to discuss and advance their understanding about concepts of energy and matter, at different levels of systems. Participants will also see how students develop understanding of the changes in matter and energy in these systems through a coherent series of investigations. These investigations include taking measurements when burning peat and other fuels to build understanding of matter and energy capacities, carbon dioxide production rates for yeast at different temperatures to understand a mechani

TAKEAWAYS:
Complex anchoring and investigative phenomena rooted in cause-and-effect thinking can deeply engage students in disciplinary core ideas and crosscutting concepts related to energy and matter that span across the disciplines of earth and life science, in systems.

SPEAKERS:
Jamie Noll (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO), Sara Krauskopf (University of Colorado-Boulder: No City, No State), DeAnna Lee Rivers (University of Colorado Boulder: No City, No State)

Crafting Three-Dimensional Multiple Choice Questions & More

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Mary Lou Williams



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Presentation
Revision History of Written Assessment

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

I will take participants through my process of crafting sets of formative multiple choice questions that each use 2 of the 3 dimensions of NGSS, so that all dimensions are addressed. I will also show my process for refining free response questions to get the exact responses I am looking for and that allow for an ease of grading and seeing students’ understanding. I will provide examples from my own classroom & direct them to where they can find more examples from various storylines. As an iHub Chemistry writer, I learned to write 3-D multiple choice formative questions. An assessment graduate course taught me how to write quality distractors to see limits of student understanding and get useful feedback data. I merge these 2 in my own classroom to create assessments to get to what my students know. I will share my learning from these trainings and more to set teachers on the path to quality 3-D classroom assessments.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn to craft three-dimensional assessments, multiple choice, and free response. Using quality distractors in multiple choice formatives allows you to pinpoint student misconceptions. Free response questions direct students to the specific response you want so that grading goes quicker.

SPEAKERS:
Sarah Evans (Olathe South High School: Olathe, KS)

Engineering Solutions for Food Deserts

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Jay McShann A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Food is a basic necessity of life, yet in the United States there are over 6,500 food deserts affecting 19 million people. Food deserts are geographic areas that lack access to affordable, healthy food options. During this session, participants will engage in conversations for how to address this inequity with students as they engineer food producing hydroponic systems. The Hydroponics storyline is the third in a series being developed by a group of 25+ educators from the midwest for science and agriculture teachers that engage students in developing explanations for agricultural phenomena and solving real-world problems. Students utilize the three dimensions of NGSS in each of the storylines as they learn about food systems, or the production, processing, distribution, and consumption of food products and interactions with the natural environment. Specific emphasis is placed on developing skills related to the Scientific & Engineering Practices and building Crosscutting Concepts.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn about a new storyline on hydroponics that explores food deserts which are geographic areas that lack access to affordable, healthy food options. Attendees will discuss one option for addressing this inequity with students as they engineer food-producing hydroponic systems.

SPEAKERS:
Chris Embry Mohr (Olympia High School: Stanford, IL)

You Can Have It All! Using Rich Science Content to Build and Assess NGSS Practices

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Basie Ballroom B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA: Skills & Content Participant Resources Folder

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

We will begin by introducing our approach to standards-based learning and providing curriculum documents such as our learning scales derived from the NGSS Science & Engineering practices and Unit “Know, Understand, Do” documents (format adopted from Carol Ann Tomlinson). Participants then engage in a complete learning cycle from the student point of view. This will include a mini task to engage in content and skill development, followed by a formative assessment. We will then share our strategies for self assessment and follow up with a differentiated activity to move participants towards proficiency before showing the summative assessment. Following this learning cycle, participants will have the opportunity to think about or collaborate with others around ways to apply their learning in their own contexts. They will have access to digital examples of content and skill pairings, as well as an opportunity to engage on an individual or small group basis with the presenters.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will walk away with practical applications and examples of skill and content-based instruction and assessment after experiencing an abbreviated learning cycle. This will include science phenomena, differentiated instructional activities, formative assessment, and summative assessment.

SPEAKERS:
Jessica Lemieux (Champlain Valley Union High School: Hinesburg, VT), Rae Bronenkant (Science Teacher: , VT), Sam Parker (Science teacher: Hinesburg, VT), Carly Brown (Champlain Valley Union High School: No City, No State)

Let's give them something to talk about!

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2214


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Developing students' "soft skills" has been a post-Covid school focus for us. This workshop will provide teachers will ready to use lessons that promote conversation and collaboration among even the quietest of students. These quick lessons of 1-3 periods can be modified to multiple NGSS content standards. In this workshop teachers will model a biotech debate, Instagram challenge, and a prehistoric Sweet 16 bracket. Most importantly- our students requested to do these lessons again! Check out our biotech debate directions: https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1GFM3Iy2-ITGp-H-H6Q0H93Fdvx7WK2xdAo07kb3QxVU/edit?usp=sharing Check out our biotech debate example: https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1bKjPCD0wkxyQGPlC6cJdokxU4OPy0xvE82K_lygpasg/edit?usp=sharing

TAKEAWAYS:
Bring home three creative lessons that will animate even your quietest students!

SPEAKERS:
Jacqueline Svetich (Science Teacher: Naperville, IL), Adrianne Toomey (Neuqua Valley High School: Naperville, IL)

Stepping into the shoes of a radiologist: isotopes, medicine, and cell division

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Lester Young B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Slides (for use with students)
Student handout

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Engage your students with a real-world application of physical sciences and biology through our scaffolded nuclear radiology case study. Nuclear medicine is a branch of radiology that uses radioactive materials to diagnose and treat disease. The purpose of this session is to introduce students to medical imaging and nuclear medicine alongside Next Generation Science Standards as they attempt to diagnose and treat a hypothetical patient. In addition to fostering critical thinking, this session connects FDG-PET (a type of nuclear imaging) to the following next generation science standards: 1) Develop models to illustrate the changes in the composition of the nucleus of the atom and the energy released during … fission, fusion, and radioactive decay. (HS-PS1-8), and 2) Use a model to illustrate the role of cellular division (mitosis) and differentiation in producing and maintaining complex organisms. (HS-LS1-4).

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will feel prepared to incorporate a nuclear radiology problem-based learning activity (developed by a radiologist and science teacher team) into their own classrooms!

SPEAKERS:
Peter Gunderman (Radiologist), Tina Ahmadi (PhD Student: Indianapolis, IN)

Introduction to Wisconsin Fast Plants

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2505 B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: Carolina Biological Supply Co.

Experience the versatility of Wisconsin Fast Plants®. These quick-growing plants engage students and are ideal for all grade levels. Easily integrate Disciplinary Core Ideas, Crosscutting Concepts, and Practices in life cycle, heredity & inheritance, variation & evolution, and environmental science.

SPEAKERS:
Laurie Nixon (Watauga High School: Boone, NC)

It’s Time To Talk About It -- Addressing the Opioid Epidemic with High School Students

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 1501 C


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: 3D Molecular Designs

According to the CDC, there were 110,000 overdose deaths in the US in 2022. 75,000 of those were due to fentanyl, a powerful and dangerous synthetic opioid. Join us as we model action potentials, how fentanyl disrupts synaptic signaling, and how Narcan can stop an overdose.

SPEAKERS:
Mark Arnholt (3D Molecular Designs: No City, No State)

COVID-19, Monkeypox, and other New and Emerging Infectious Diseases

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2505 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: Savvas Learning Company

N/A

SPEAKERS:
Joseph Levine (Science Writer and Producer: Concord, MA)

All Systems Go: The Human Body as a System

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2214


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Learning science can sometimes focus on concepts often challenging to engage in due to the scale of being too small to be seen or too large to comprehend. This NGSS-designed unit offers tools to engage ALL students and connect micro and macro concepts around systems to develop concrete understandings. This 20+ lesson unit is driven by phenomena guiding students toward the concept of a “system,” from the cell level to a global level. Students explore the system at a cellular level through real-world connections and then build models of interacting subsystems. The disruptions of these systems are experienced through the examination of a viral illness and its effect on human systems. Students engage in argument with evidence to support a claim of the interdependence of systems. This concept is then applied to Earth systems and how disruption in a part of an Earth system affects the whole. Participants experience this unit through a 5E format and leave with the unit and resources.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will construct an explanation for how parts of a system are interdependent both at the micro level and the macro level.

SPEAKERS:
Julia Smith (Riverside Unified School District: Riverside, CA), Heather McDonald (Riverside Unified School District: Riverside, CA)

Evaluating Student Work in the Science Classroom: Standards-Based Scoring & Teacher Calibration

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Jay McShann A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Google Slide Deck

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Making the move from a traditional grading system to a standards based grading system can be an overwhelming task. It was especially challenging for two of Stevenson High School’s largest teams: AP biology (10 teachers) and accelerated chemistry (18 teachers). We will share how we came up with our standards and our success criteria for teaching skills and scoring student work. We will also share how those standards and success criteria have changed over the last four years. Attendees will be able to view our assessments, look at student work, and then score sample assessments. Presenters will also share several different calibration strategies that have worked for our larger team, ranging from Google jamboards, Google slides, and Google forms.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will walk away with a scaffolded way to determine the skills they want to assess in their course and how they can begin to develop success criteria. Attendees will also take away some strategies for how to calibrate their scoring.

SPEAKERS:
Kristen One (Adlai E. Stevenson High School: Lincolnshire, IL), Nathan Gustin (Adlai E. Stevenson High School: Lincolnshire, IL), Karen O'Connor (Adlai E. Stevenson High School: Lincolnshire, IL)

You Don't Know It Until You Can Explain It!

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Big Joe Turner A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1xYn73KlvWbyJ39Pxa6fwHQZN5rEmBVOvfc5tHOrLVq0/edit?usp=sharing
Presentation slides from KC NSTA 2023 Conference including library on resources on the last slide for video modeling pieces, reflection sheet docs, and exemplar videos.
Video Modeling Slides (includes library of resources on last slide)

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

In this hands-on workshop, you will engage in an "assessment FOR learning" activity called Video Modeling. Video Modeling is a teaching technique developed at the intersection of multiple goals: (1) for students to build a strong foundation in disciplinary core ideas (DCIs) while engaging in 3-D learning, (2) to have students cooperatively & actively explain concepts, but to do so as a formative assessment that welcomes failure and reflection, and (3) to have students develop more ownership and agency along with SEL skills. Participants will understand the learning research Video Modeling is designed from, participate in the activity "as students", and see reflections, strategies, and action research from my experience of teaching and revising this method throughout my teaching career.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers can add to their toolbox an "assessment for learning" framework that can be employed with any DCI from any content area to support student engagement in the scientific practices and crosscutting concepts.

SPEAKERS:
Thomas Wolfe (Adlai E. Stevenson High School: Lincolnshire, IL)

The Students and the Standards Have Changed, Have You?

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Basie Ballroom B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

This presentation will involve a Google Slide show detailing why some of our beloved labs do not meet the NGSS standards and how we can adjust these labs through phenomena, critical thinking questions, CER, and rubrics to meet those standards. Furthermore, this presentation's primary purpose is to highlight why we struggle with "students today." It is a fact that students have changed; we expect students to change. It's the fact that we as educators have not adapted to the students that are in front of us today. They have changed but have we, as educators? Have our lessons and lab experiences changed with them? This presentation will show how to adapt and adjust old lab experiences (biology, chemistry, environmental science, and physics) to meet the NGSS standards and why newer phenomena-based lessons differ from old recipe labs. If time permits, teachers will work on a lab they want to update.

TAKEAWAYS:
The main takeaway from this presentation will be how we incorporate rubrics, critical thinking questions, and phenomena into our lab experiences to meet the students & standards of today—cultivating an engaging and collaborative experience for the students.

SPEAKERS:
Dennis Dagounis (Berkeley Heights Public Schools: Berkeley Heights, NJ)

Using Societal Challenges as Phenomena in 3-D Units to Develop Student Agency

Saturday, October 28 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 F


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The Framework for K-12 Science Education and NGSS calls for learning that is grounded in real world phenomena and problems to ensure that science learning is relevant to all students. The BSCS Anchored Inquiry Learning (AIL) instructional model succeeds the 5Es and utilizes complex and culturally relevant societal challenges to anchor multiple cycles of inquiry and sensemaking, culminating with student explanations/design solutions. AIL employs science education research emphasizing coherence from students’ perspective. In this session, participants will: 1) consider their own ideas about teaching complex societal challenges, 2) experience 3-D learning and sensemaking strategies and consider the science concepts of a societal challenge (e.g., antibiotic resistance, heart disease, food sustainability, anthropogenic changes to biodiversity), and 3) consider how using societal issues as anchoring phenomena and problems can motivate students and develop agency in addressing complex issues.

TAKEAWAYS:
The research-based BSCS Anchored Inquiry Learning instructional model succeeds the 5Es and leverages complex societal issues as anchoring phenomena/problems, culminating tasks, and performance assessments in 3-D units of instruction to motivate students and develop agency in addressing these issues.

SPEAKERS:
Nancy Hopkins-Evans (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO), Cynthia Gay (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO)

Online Preliminary Course Could Increase Engagement and Retention for Incoming General Biology and Anatomy Undergraduate Students

Saturday, October 28 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 C


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Throughout teaching Anatomy and Physiology (A&P) and General Biology, students often face academic challenges surrounding these two foundational courses. One intended method to overcome these challenges is to implement a preliminary online course that students can complete before starting the academic year. Attendees will discuss how to design their own preliminary online course through an interactive workshop (in electronic and hard-copy formats) with group-based activities (e.g., discussions and demos) for any college-level biology course. We will also demonstrate various methods and assessments (e.g., recorded videos, quizzes, virtual escape rooms) best suited for students who choose to take the prep course through our findings at our current college. A sample of our current preliminary online courses can be found via this link: https://sites.google.com/springfieldcollege.edu/bioprepcoursessc/general-biology-online-course

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn about our experience using a preliminary online course for undergraduates. Attendees will then learn how to design their own prep courses focusing on what students require in general biology and anatomy.

SPEAKERS:
Gemma Bartha (Instructor: Springfield, MA), Joseph Kele (Professor of Biology)

Standards-Based Grading and Learning in 3-D

Saturday, October 28 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

I will walk the audience through a landing page of my scale development for grading based off of Marzano’s book of scales for NGSS. I will explain how to convert the 0-4 grade into percentages for conventional grading systems. I will walk them through how to allow students to self-assess their knowledge gain based on objectives and putting those objectives into ladders of curriculum sequence. I will also explain how to use benchmark sheets for the Science and Engineering Practices that match their SEP part of the scale. I will also share the books and websites I gained my knowledge from, so attendees can develop their own mental model of the system for Standards-Based Grading and Learning.

TAKEAWAYS:
You will walk away with a landing page that lays out a system that can be your starting point into SBG & L in the three dimensions, with many resources contained within.

SPEAKERS:
Michelle Gall (Science Teacher and MTSS Facilitator)

Un-Cooking the Egg – Modeling Protein Structure and Denaturation

Saturday, October 28 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 1501 C


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: 3D Molecular Designs

What happens when you cook an egg? Is it possible to un-cook it? Investigate the characteristics of amino acids, the levels (and rules!) of protein folding, and how denaturing a protein alters its function in an engaging hands-on modeling investigation using the Amino Acid Starter Kit ©.

SPEAKERS:
Mark Arnholt (3D Molecular Designs: No City, No State)

Global Change Meets NGSS: A Conceptual Framework for Teaching

Saturday, October 28 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Many scientists argue that we live in a new geological epoch – the Anthropocene – named because human activity has become the most powerful driver of global change. That sounds intriguing… but what does it actually mean? Which human activities are driving global change? What changes are these drivers causing? How do those changes affect the biosphere? Interestingly, answering these questions – even in a brief presentation that restricts the number of drivers of change to a handful – often seems to “take the edge off” ideological bias that stubbornly impedes communication about the significance of climate change and other global change phenomena. This approach is also more scientifically accurate than ascribing all threats to ecosystem functions and biodiversity exclusively to climate change. As global human population rises toward 9 billion, understanding the multiple ways that our activities affect the biosphere is essential for efforts to find a safe operating space for humanity.

TAKEAWAYS:
Human-biosphere interactions offer relevant narratives and conceptual frameworks that integrate cause and effect; systems and system models; structure and function; and stability and change.

SPEAKERS:
Joseph Levine (Science Writer and Producer: Concord, MA)

The Science of Infectious Diseases

Saturday, October 28 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 1501 C


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: 3D Molecular Designs

This session will preview a professional learning opportunity being developed by 3-D Molecular Designs focused on the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases.  This project is funded by an NIH SEPA award to 3-D Molecular Designs.

SPEAKERS:
Tim Herman (3D Molecular Designs: Milwaukee, WI)

Genes, Traits and Change Over Time

Saturday, October 28 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The poster will highlight a free unit that is comprised of easy-to-implement multimedia and paper-based activities paired with scaffolded practice in working with models, crafting explanations, and identifying cause and effect relationships. The unit’s student and teacher resources are available at: https://teach.genetics.utah.edu/content/change The poster will feature: • An engaging dog breeding game with achievements • An activity where students see how their own traits would affect their chances of surviving and reproducing in fantastic situations • Online interactives that explore the non-directional nature of natural selection, artificial selection in plants, and the role of proteins in making traits • Videos that illustrate the gene/environment connection, how traits are inherited, and how natural selection works

TAKEAWAYS:
Where to access a new, free, NGSS-friendly unit on genetics, heredity, and natural selection.

SPEAKERS:
Molly Malone (The University of Utah: Salt Lake City, UT)

Students as Scientists: Nature-Based Inquiry

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2104 B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Discover our newest curriculum, “Students as Scientists: Nature-based Inquiry”. This free curriculum is designed to engage all students in hands-on, authentic, inquiry projects inspired by nature. The curriculum is NGSS aligned, grade-banded K-5 and 6-12, and teacher co-written and reviewed. We intentionally diversified the people representing scientists and incorporated culturally responsive and sustaining techniques. Learn how to harness questions that arise from observing nature and help students discover their inner scientist with materials that aid teachers in scaffolding authentic inquiry. Questions might range from “How do the kinds of birds we see change during the year?” to “Why aren’t we seeing more butterflies at our school and what can we do to get more to visit?” to “How good is the water quality in the stream that runs through town?” By engaging in nature-based investigations, students develop their science skills and engage in science practices.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will explore our latest K-5 and 6-12 inquiry curriculum, discover tips and techniques for engaging all learners in nature-based inquiry investigations, and discuss ways to make inquiry learning relevant to your students.

SPEAKERS:
Susan Licher (Cornell Lab of Ornithology: Ithaca, NY)

Food Science Literacy- A Real World Application in the Classroom

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 1501 C


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

This is an overview of the farm-to-table process through the FDA. Labs are written so that the level of literacy is equitable to the grade span for which it is written. Grade levels 5-12 are included in the curriculum and NGSS standards included. The curriculum spans biology, chemistry, physical science, environmental science, and food and consumer science. It is written free of bias so that all students regardless of their life experiences can relate science to everyday food safety and nutrition. Food safety and nutrition will be discussed, curriculum links, methods, and activities to bring real-world knowledge into the classroom will be shared. Ideas for incorporating lessons as well as the literacy standards linking reading nonfiction topics in the science classroom will be addressed. Three classroom activities using beef, milk and salt will be demonstrated to show connections with science literacy standards.

TAKEAWAYS:
Students will: 1. be introduced to the fundamentals of microbiology while, at the same time, identifying important public health information through literature and hands-on learning activities; 2. learn about the label, and that nutrition not only aids in general well-being.

SPEAKERS:
Leanne Thele (Perryville High School: No City, No State), Tiska Rodgers (Clarkton High School: Clarkton, MO)

Understanding Soils and Our Food

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2505 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

For Teachers, By Teachers -- A group of 25+ educators from the Midwest are currently developing a series of storyline units for science and agriculture teachers that engage students in developing explanations for agricultural phenomena and solving real-world problems. Students utilize the three dimensions of NGSS in each of the storylines as they learn about food systems, or the production, processing, distribution, and consumption of food products and interactions with the natural environment. During this session, participants will learn about storyline #2 which challenges students to figure out how different soils affect the kinds and quantities of food commodities that can be produced. Topics include: what is soil, effects of soil on plant growth, movement of matter and energy in soil, and how to decrease human impact on soils and biodiversity. Specific emphasis is placed on developing skills related to the Scientific & Engineering Practices and building Crosscutting Concepts.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will engage in activities that are part of a new storyline unit on how soil affects the types and quantities of food commodities grown. Topics include what is soil, the effect of soil on plant growth, movement of matter and energy through soils, and how to decrease human impact on soils.

SPEAKERS:
Chris Embry Mohr (Olympia High School: Stanford, IL)

Ecology and Ethology in the Schoolyard: Students Conduct Original Field Studies

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2105



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Abstract, Note to participants, references
Across front m the conference
Slide presentation (background and agenda)

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

A seventh grader writes: “I have learned about watching my surroundings and how every part of the school has an ecosystem that stretches far beyond most people’s understanding.” Searching, finding, observing, and describing living things in students' environment connects them with their place. Questions worth investigating arise with ease and abundance. Developing and implementing systematic protocols help students reach more deeply into ecological phenomena. Animal behavior observed “in the wild” fosters natural engagement. Students’ questions and focused inquiries can lead to original insights that strengthen a sense of place. In this workshop, we will try our hand at the initial stages of a focused field study; perhaps tracking the behavior of urban birds, surveying the diversity of urban spiders, or mapping the travel of urban ants. The goal will be for teachers to relate the workshop experience to the potential of their own schoolyards for study. Samples of student work will inspire.

TAKEAWAYS:
The local environment of the schoolyard and neighborhood offers great potential for students to practice authentic and original field science.

SPEAKERS:
Richard Frazier (retired)

Growing the Next Generation of Scientists: The Donald Danforth Plant Science Center's Innovative STEAM+Ag Programs

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The Donald Danforth Plant Science Center (DDPSC) in St. Louis, MO, is the world's largest non-academic plant science research institute. DDPSC collaborates with K-12 schools and higher education institutions to offer authentic research experiences (AREs) and course-based research experiences (CUREs), allowing students to participate in real science as practicing scientists. DDPSC’s 6-12 geospatial education program engages students to use GIS and remote sensing tools to address local plant science and agriculture challenges. DDPSC also partners with AVR companies like Zspace to offer students X-reality learning experiences that foster engagement in science practice and communication. Using qualitative and quantitative methods, we measure the impact of these programs on students’ STEM identity, interests, and career interests.

TAKEAWAYS:
The Danforth Center collaborates with K-12 and higher education to provide research, geospatial, and X-reality experiences for students in and out of the classroom to shape their STEM identities and expand their thinking about careers in STEM.

SPEAKERS:
Ashley Kass (ARE Coordinator: St Louis, MO), Kristine Callis-Duehl (Donald Danforth Plant Science Center: Saint Louis, MO)

Nourish the Future: Energy and Biofuels

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 1501 C


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Students utilize different components (enzymes, yeast, feed stocks, water] to produce ethanol and carbon dioxide through fermentation. Students develop a model and explain how ethanol is made to answer the focus question: "How can fermentation produce a renewable fuel source?" Students develop experimental models to generate data to construct explanations about relationships between components of the fermentation process and to predict how they can be manipulated to produce carbon dioxide. Students will design solutions to make the fermentation process as efficient as possible and generate the maximum amount of ethanol in a small bag environment. Participants will deconstruct a model of starch to examine enzyme and starch reactions to determine how starches change into smaller molecules. Attendees will participate in numerous hands-on activities centered around biofuel.

TAKEAWAYS:
Nourish the Future is a national education initiative developed by science teachers for science teachers to connect students to modern agriculture and provide sound science-based resources that meet teacher and student needs in the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Leanne Thele (Perryville High School: No City, No State), Tiska Rodgers (Clarkton High School: Clarkton, MO)

Effectively Use Phenomena that Highlights the Lived Experiences and Narratives of Diverse Scientists in Biology Lessons

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2502 A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
An Interdisciplinary Investigation of African Rock Art Images to Learn about Sci
Visibility In STEM
Visibility In STEM
YouTube Channel: Visibility In STEM

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The need for student identification and belonging in the scientific community begins in the biology curriculum. This requires the use of scientific practices to facilitate sensemaking that supports equitable classroom practices and equitable science content and pedagogy. This presentation provides examples of engaging phenomena that highlight the lived experiences and narratives of diverse scientists and that supports meaningful inclusion in the classroom. This presentation also focuses on the rationale and benefits to teachers and students for developing equity-mindedness for meaningful inclusion. These lesson ideas and strategies are supported by the three dimensions of the Next Generational Science Standards. Attendees will learn how to help students engage in critical thinking skills, learn science, and build understandings related to the social and cultural nature of science. Connections to the three dimensions of STEM will be made. This presentation draws funded projects.

TAKEAWAYS:
Use engaging phenomena from diverse scientists alongside inquiry and argumentation to engage in scientific practices and scientific text, supported by the NGSS three dimensions of STEM. Connections to Common Core and equitable classroom practices are made.

SPEAKERS:
Catherine Quinlan (Howard University)

Cutting Through the Chemistry of CRISPR Cas-9.

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 H


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The unique nature of this presentation leverages the extensive knowledge and experience of both a chemistry and a biology educator (who is also a research scientist) to show how teachers can use biotechnologies, such as DNA Fingerprinting and CRISPR Cas-9, to motivate student exploration while expanding their chemistry knowledge and inspiring them to pursue research. This topic is particularly important because CRISPR Cas-9 is at the forefront of medical breakthroughs such as CAR-T cell cancer treatments and gene therapy. Unfortunately, this topic has not yet been used to its full potential in the classroom. This presentation will raise awareness among teachers of how to explain and utilize biotechnologies in various ways. Specifically, this session will show how to use chemistry to explain CRISPR Cas-9 while emphasizing the six elements of life, functional groups, and macromolecules (using hands-on molecular models) to leverage sense making to explain these complex processes.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how to excite students to learn and apply Chemistry necessary to understand the latest breakthroughs in biotechnology such as DNA Fingerprinting and CRISPR-Cas9. This presentation will showcase the crosscutting concept of systems and system models.

SPEAKERS:
Susan Allison (Dawson Education Service Cooperative: Arkadelphia, AR), Patrycja Krakowiak (Biology Instructor: Hot Springs, AR)

Making Sense of NGSS Standards to Support Student Sensemaking

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 C


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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In this session, we will introduce teachers to a standards-unpacking document Kansas Department of Education is developing to provide teachers with unpacked standards and ideas to guide NGSS planning. Using appendices E (K-12 DCI), F (K-12 SEP), and G (K-12 CCC) from the NGSS Framework supports vertical alignment of each of the three dimensions which allows teachers to identify the grade-band aligned experiences that students need in order to reach the full level of the standard through three-dimensional sensemaking. We will use the tool to identify what is new and unique to the focus grade-band to ensure grade-level appropriate learning experiences and expectations. We will show teachers how the unpacked standard tool promotes using their own students’ interests and experiences to plan to incorporate local phenomenon as a key part of three-dimensional sensemaking. We will provide teachers with access to and/or copies of the standards unpacking tool.

TAKEAWAYS:
We share a tool used to unpack standards for foundational concepts & key experiences that students need to make sense of all three dimensions of a standard. Participants will be able to consider their own students’ interests and identities to plan to support sensemaking for their student population.

SPEAKERS:
Stephanie Alderman-Oler (Washington High School: Kansas City, KS), Sarah Evans (Olathe South High School: Olathe, KS)

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