2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

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FILTERS APPLIED:9 - 12, Hands-On Workshop, Students and Sensemaking, Earth

 

Rooms and times subject to change.
12 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Decoding Starlight—From Photons to Pixels to Images—Using Science and Art

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Lester Young A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Decoding Starlight - paper and pencil version
Decoding Starlight - student version
Decoding Starlight Presentation
Js9 Astronomy Image Analysis Software
Making 3 Color Composites with js9 - student handout

STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

To analyze data from space and ground-based telescopes, scientists rely on computers, not only to do calculations, but also to change numbers into images. Scientists and programmers go through painstaking calibration and validation processes to ensure that computers produce technically correct images. Visual representation of X-ray data, and radio, infrared, ultraviolet, visible, and gamma, involves the use of representative color techniques where colors in the image represent intensity, energy, temperature, or another property of the radiation. This activity creates models from numerical data. Each model will be unique, depending upon how the photon intensity and energy data was processed – binned and assigned color values – and then analyzed. Artistic representations of this data will be made "by hand" and also by using web-based js9 imaging and analysis software. This is one step in allowing students to do their own astronomy research using real data sets.

TAKEAWAYS:
Scientists learn about astronomical objects from the light they produce. Colors in images are based on data from this light and are used to highlight different features.

SPEAKERS:
Pamela Perry (Lewiston High School: Lewiston, ME)

Space Telescopes: How they work, and how to simulate them in your classroom

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Julie Lee


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

An extension of our previous NASA/JWST ambassador and NSTA workshops, this session empowers educators with deeper understanding of orbiting observatories and provides an inherently engaging hands-on activity which works from pure STEM/STEAM fun to serious exploration of multi-wavelength astronomy. We provide gel filters that participants use with their phones to capture monochrome images at three wavelengths (630nm, 530nm & 470nm for red, green and blue). Participants then open their images in a free, browser-based image processing app to combine them into a "color" picture. This locks in an understanding of how "color" results from image processing. Then, participants choose NASA image files from an archive and repeat the process -- only now, they are assigning RG&B to wavelengths that are not actually visible to the eye. The tool we use includes both presets to make this fun as an introductory activity, and an array of math-driven functionality for deep dives into image processing.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will learn to process multi-wavelength image sets to create color images from space telescopes and your own devices. This leads to a deeper understanding of space-based astronomy and how space telescope images are made – and provides a classroom activity that is fun, rich, and economical.

SPEAKERS:
Donna Kaiser (Stamford High School: Stamford, CT), Vincent Urbanowski (Academy of Information Technology & Engineering: Stamford, CT)

Why are oysters dying and how can we use chemistry to protect them? Using chemistry to solve ESS problems

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Basie Ballroom A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA23 KC - C.4 Chemical Reactions in our World Webinar September 2023 (1).pdf
Additional materials may be found using the following link: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1AIM1naKisNQng5r-fuUrs-FEUEhlrync?usp=sharing

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

OpenSciEd Chemistry units use a justice-centered storyline approach to help students figure out answers to their questions. The central focus of the Oysters unit is food sovereignty engineering design: how can people reclaim important foods that they’ve lost due to colonization and ecosystem disruption? In this session, participants will experience portions of the unit’s anchor in “student hat” before reviewing the unit as a whole in teacher hat. Participants will see how students develop engineering design solutions using NGSS-aligned chemistry and Earth and space science models and practices including the carbon cycle, acid-base interactions, reversible reactions, and stoichiometry (scale, proportion, & quantity). These lessons include testing pH of various solutions and concentration; using mathematical thinking to inform design solutions; and identifying how humans have impacted the carbon cycle.

TAKEAWAYS:
This unit supports students as they figure out understandings of reversible reactions through explaining changes in ocean chemistry to engineer solutions to prevent oyster die offs. Participants will see how students build these ideas and develop mathematical thinking throughout the unit.

SPEAKERS:
Nicole Vick (Northwestern University), Kerri Wingert (Good Question Research: Boulder, CO)

Analyzing X-Ray Pulses from Stellar Cores Using Physics and Web-Based NASA Data, and STEM Image Analysis Tools

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Lester Young A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Analysis of Two Pulsating X-ray sources js9 (revised).pdf
Analysis of X-Ray Sources with Js9 presentation
Js9 Astronomy Image Analysis Software
X-Ray Spectroscopy of SNRs js9 presentation

STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Participants will use light curve graphs and image analysis software tools located on the web to investigate stellar objects at the centers of supernova remnants, and determine if the objects are white dwarfs or neutron stars. Two sets of data from the Chandra X-Ray public archive will be used to plot brightness versus time to determine the rate of rotation of the object. Centripetal acceleration and Newton's Universal Law of gravitation calculations will then be applied. This activity is designed for physics and/or astronomy classes and integrates STEM analysis tools with the crosscutting concepts, physical science core disciplinary content and engineering concepts embodied by NGSS. Students may also use tools learned in this activity to use js9 to do further research projects using publicly available astronomy data sets.

TAKEAWAYS:
Light curves generated from web-based js9 image analysis software can be used to determine the period of rotation and identify objects as white dwarfs or pulsars using Newton’s Universal Law of gravitation and centripetal acceleration calculations.

SPEAKERS:
Pamela Perry (Lewiston High School: Lewiston, ME)

Space-Based Observatories – Use Them Like an Astronomer

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Lester Young A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Presentational content will include a high level overview of NASA’s Great Observatories and other past and present orbiting telescopes, how their missions are coordinated, and how they work in concert to provide full spectrum data from across the sky in bands from gamma down to far infrared – almost all of which are invisible to the human eye. In the workshop portion, participants will access archived astronomical data from orbiting observatories using the same browser based tools used by astronomers. They will process their datasets using a variety of tools and techniques for reducing data, vetting objects, and generating results, such as Spectral Energy Distribution, Color-Color and Color-Magnitude plots. Teachers will bring this experience back to their classrooms adding depth of knowledge to astronomy content they may teach, as well as a deeper understanding of the conduct of science research.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn to access astronomical data such as monochrome images at various wavelengths and wavelength magnitude measurements for thousands of stars at a time just as professional astronomers do, and how to process such data for research using techniques of professional astronomy.

SPEAKERS:
Donna Kaiser (Stamford High School: Stamford, CT), Vincent Urbanowski (Academy of Information Technology & Engineering: Stamford, CT)

Exploring Marine Hydrokinetics

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Julie Lee


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

NEED’s Exploring Marine Hydrokinetics (MHK) is an exploratory unit for secondary students that includes teacher and student guides containing comprehensive background information on energy, the properties of fluids and waves, electricity, hydrokinetic technologies, and careers in the emerging industry of MHK. Participants will have the opportunity to apply the science of the oceans and electricity generation as they learn about the many types of MHK technology, explore case studies, consider siting a project, and build their own sample wave generator model. The curriculum is available for free and includes hands-on, inquiry-based explorations, group presentations, and cooperative learning activities.

TAKEAWAYS:
The energy of moving water can be harnessed and converted into electricity in many ways, including technologies for harnessing the energy in ocean tides, waves, and currents. Participants will learn activities for students that explore these concepts and best practices for implementing.

SPEAKERS:
Don Pruett, Jr. (Washington Science Teachers Association: Everett, WA)

Incorporating Earth and Space Science NGSS Core Ideas into Chemistry

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Lester Young A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Most students in Missouri only take physical and life sciences to graduate leaving the Earth & Space Science strands of NGSS untouched. Most educators, additionally, do not have a strong enough earth & space science background to integrate these strands into their science classes. However, most of these Earth and Science strands can easily be adapted into a high school chemistry class (and biology, although my background is in chemistry) without having to give up core content. In this presentation, educators will be do a wet lab (Cleaning Up an Ocean Oil Spill) and receive access to additional labs (precipitation lab, acid rain lab, and viscosity of volcanoes) that meet the basic general chemistry class standards (PS NGSS strands) and incorporate earth and space sciences. Attendees will also learn of additional resources such as Gizmos and NASA that can be incorporated and hit the ESS science standards. Lastly, attendees will learn of books and resources for them to learn more.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn how to integrate the Earth & Space standards into a basic chemistry high school class. Resources can be adapted for biology and middle school levels.

SPEAKERS:
Stephanie Coyle (Jefferson Middle School: Columbia, MO)

Earth Science Lessons in the Science Practices Innovation Notebook (SPIN)

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Lester Young A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA_SPIN2023.pptx

STRAND: Tech Tools

Show Details

SPIN, a FREE web-based notebook created with funding by NSF, has three customizable lessons for data-focused investigations in Earth Science on Sunspots, Tides, and Hurricanes. Teachers can also input their own lessons into SPIN. One of the teachers who created the lessons in the notebook will be presenting. The first 30 minutes presenters will give teachers accounts in SPIN and show how students can use the notebook and the metacognitive support features such as the Communication Hub, I’m Stuck button, and SPAARC prompts. Experiences of teachers and students who have used SPIN will be discussed. In the final 30 minutes, teachers will customize a lesson in SPIN or input their own lessons with help from the presenters. By the end of the session, teachers will be able to use SPIN effectively with the ability to share the notebook with all of the teachers at their school. Use of SPIN is free and is found at https://spin.cehd.gmu.edu/login. Biology, chemistry, and physics also available.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will learn how to use SPIN to download and edit a lesson from the Global Marketplace or create their own lesson in SPIN. Teachers who have used SPIN note that it has helped their students understand data practices explicitly.

SPEAKERS:
Kevin Cabaniss (Teacher, Science), Erin Peters-Burton (George Mason University: Fairfax, VA)

Star Formation in the Cartwheel Galaxy with Web-Based NASA Data and STEM Image Analysis Tools

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Jay McShann B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Cartwheel Galaxy js9 (revised).pdf
Cartwheel Galaxy js9 Presentation
Js9 Astronomy Image Analysis Software

STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Participants will use web-based image and data analysis software and real data sets to compare the Cartwheel Galaxy in optical and X-ray bands to determine the sources of the ultra and hyperluminous X-rays in the galaxy. This investigation can be done on smart phones, laptops, and tablets with an internet connection. The unusual shape of the Cartwheel Galaxy is most probably the result of a collision with one of the smaller nearby galaxies several hundred years ago. The collision produced compression waves within the galaxy which triggered bursts of massive star formation. Participants will use the location of the U/HLXs on the x-ray image and optical image, as well as information about expansion rates and the life cycles of stars to determine what these objects might be. This is a great introduction to the software that astrophysicists use. Participants will also learn about the possibilities for other kinds of investigations and research with the software and the thousands of available data sets.

TAKEAWAYS:
Astrophysicists use light in all bands of the electromagnetic spectrum to determine the nature of an object. Web-based software will be used; the same tools used by scientists. This software can be used by students to do their own investigations in astronomy with real data sets.

SPEAKERS:
Pamela Perry (Lewiston High School: Lewiston, ME)

New Tools for Analyzing and Creating Astronomical Images from Vera C. Rubin Observatory

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Lester Young A


STRAND: Tech Tools

Show Details

Rubin Observatory is a public US observatory funded by the NSF. Educational materials and services are freely available to all. “Coloring the Universe” is one of six free online investigations that offer a complete, classroom ready lesson. Designed to support the NGSS, it comes with a phenomenon, teacher guide, presentation slides, videos, and a variety of three-dimensional formative and summative assessments and scoring guides. Since the entire lesson cannot be completed in 60 minutes, we will adopt a drop in approach at various places of the phenomenon and online app, and role-playing from the student perspective.We will then visit the website to preview additional resources. This workshop will also model how the lesson can be incorporated in Earth-Space or Physics storylines, and will demonstrate formative assessment and inclusive learning techniques.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how to use the free interactive Coloring the Universe online investigation and support materials designed for NGSS teaching and learning, as well as active learning and assessment strategies that support inclusive techniques for building student communication skills.

SPEAKERS:
Ardis Herrold (Vera C. Rubin Observatory: Tucson, AZ)

Investigating Stellar Evolution – From Star Formation Regions to Catastrophic Destruction – using NASA Image Sets

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Jay McShann B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
https://chandra.si.edu/
https://chandra.si.edu/edu/
https://chandra.si.edu/edu/
https://universe-of-learning.org/home
Presentation Slide Set
SE RESOURCES Kansas City.pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Stars form in giant molecular clouds of gas and dust in massive star formation complexes, and depending on their initial mass, usually follow a sequence that ends in their destruction in catastrophic collapses and explosions. The process of stellar evolution provides the energy which drives the universe, and thereby determines its future. During the last stages of evolution, nucleosynthesis creates the elements which will enrich the next generation of protostars and planets. formation of stars also sets the stage for possible exoplanets forming within the debris disks of young protostars as hydrogen begins to fuse in their cores. This basic sequencing activity is one of a series of activities designed to show how scientists view, study, and examine the process of stellar evolution. The card sets have descriptions and links and can be used as a pretest or a posttest, either individually or as a group. Multiple answers are acceptable. A scoring rubric is included.

TAKEAWAYS:
Stellar evolution is a cosmic cycle from the formation of protostars and stars in cold molecular clouds, through their final collapses into remnants and stellar cores. This process creates heavier elements and sets the stage for the formation of exoplanets and the next generation of star formation.

SPEAKERS:
Donna Young (NASA/NSO/UoL Program Manager: Laughlin, NV)

Using Authentic Data to Evaluate the Expansion of the Unverse

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 E


STRAND: Tech Tools

Show Details

Rubin Observatory is a public US observatory funded by the NSF. Educational materials and services are freely available to all. “Expanding Universe” is one of six free online investigations that offer a complete, classroom ready lesson. Designed to support the NGSS, it comes with a phenomenon, teacher guide, presentation slides, videos, and a variety of three-dimensional formative and summative assessments and scoring guides. This workshop will model scaffolded teaching and assessment techniques to help students achieve success in making sense of abstract concepts presented in the lesson. Since the entire lesson cannot be completed in 60 minutes, we will adopt a drop in approach at various points by using portions of the phenomenon and the online app, and role-playing from the student perspective. We will then visit the website to preview additional resources.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how to use the free interactive Expanding Universe online investigation and support materials designed for NGSS teaching and learning, as well as scaffolded teaching, and as formative assessment strategies to ensure that all students may achieve a successful learning experience.

SPEAKERS:
Ardis Herrold (Vera C. Rubin Observatory: Tucson, AZ)

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