2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

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Rooms and times subject to change.
51 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

PLI-1: OpenSciEd Middle School: Revealing Students' Brilliance

Wednesday, October 25 • 8:15 AM - 3:30 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 H

Add to Cart 53 tickets available


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Come join us to see how OpenSciEd’s materials can help you reveal your students’ brilliance. The first full day of the professional learning institute (PLI) will simultaneously prepare you to teach the first unit in the OpenSciEd middle school program and provide the support you need to advance your practice so that learning is both driven by student questions and leads to the foundational science learning they need to be successful. To do this, this session will put teachers in the student’s seat so they can feel what it's like to be a student whose thoughts and questions are valued in the drive to figure out puzzling phenomena. We actually do science together with the facilitator acting as the "teacher" and then dig in to help you see the coherence across the program and the details in the first units you will be teaching.

TAKEAWAYS:
How OpenSciEd's free and publicly available instructional materials and professional learning can make my vision for science education a reality.

SPEAKERS:
Whitney Mills (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO), Thomas Clayton (K-5 STEAM Specialist: Berkeley Heights, NJ)

I can't wait for science class! - The How and Why of 3D Phenomenon-Based Learning

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 H


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

In pre-NGSS approaches to science teaching, units were often sequenced based on how experts understand the relationship among concepts. This means that it typically requires an understanding of the concepts being taught to understand why a unit is sequenced the way it is. The result is that the sequence of activities may make sense to a teacher, but doesn’t necessarily make sense to the students. The shift to phenomena-based 3D learning brings the student to the center of the learning and uses their life experiences and approaches to sensemaking to drive the learning. This session will highlight how powerful this shift is for student ownership of learning and general engagement. Additionally, we will describe HOW to make this a reality in classrooms and provide participants with resources and supports to bring this learning to life in their classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
The shift to phenomena-based 3D learning brings the student to the center of the learning and uses their life experiences and approaches to sensemaking to drive the learning forward.

SPEAKERS:
Matt Krehbiel (OpenSciEd: New York, NY)

Developing Storylines from a Compelling Anchor

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 D



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Link to the Session Slides

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

N/A

TAKEAWAYS:
Presenting a compelling phenomenon or design challenge requires framing a question and choosing material carefully. Building a storyline requires testing out a launch of a unit to anticipate student questions about it, and first identifying what students will figure out in each lesson of a unit before it occurs.

SPEAKERS:
Bill Penuel (: Boulder, CO)

One Size Doesn’t Fit All: Creating a Successful Science Learning Environment for Multilingual Learners

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2502 B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: Amplify

Learn how multimodal instruction and embedded language scaffolds, such as language frames, vocabulary routines, and writing supports create a learning environment that help Multilingual Learners – and all learners – successfully access science instruction.

Exploring Local Phenomena through a Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) Lens

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 D


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Centering learning around local phenomena can foster sustainable futures when learning is framed in larger global systems thinking and principles. The SDGs provide a framework of 17 central goals that help to foster thriving and sustainable communities. The SDGs are used across many different nations to raise awareness, engage people in action around critical needs for fostering thriving communities, and innovate solutions for our shared futures. This session will explore the SDG framework and its connections to potential local phenomena that connect to learning standards. Participants will be supported to consider examples of how this framework can be used for teaching students about sustainability, climate solutions, and green economy transitions that are critical to our shared future. We will draw on resources and experiences from partner organizations across the nation and the world.

TAKEAWAYS:
After learning about the SDGs, participants will explore the interrelationships between the SDG Framework and local phenomena for use in their own teaching.

SPEAKERS:
Deb Morrison (Educator and Learning Scientist: Seattle, WA), Brian Mandell (Smithsonian Science Education Center: Washington, DC), John Olson (Metropolitan State University: Saint Paul, MN)

You Have the Power! Bringing Phenomena to Life With NGSS-Designed Instructional Materials

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2502 B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: Amplify

High-quality instructional materials are essential for equitable access to science, but materials are only the start of the instructional journey! Examine the importance of YOUR role as a teacher in leveraging NGSS-designed curriculum to inspire your students to figure out phenomena.

From Student to Inventor: How to Get Started

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Are you ready to start inventing with your students but don’t know how to start? Do you have students with innovative ideas who need help protecting those ideas? Intellectual property can be a complex and often confusing topic, but it's essential for students to understand how to protect their own ideas and creations. Many teachers recognize the need to help their students protect their ideas and inventions when they work on science and engineering projects, but may not have a background in IP or the resources to teach it effectively. This presentation will provide an overview of how to teach IP and invention education in science classrooms, with a focus on practical and hands-on activities that engage students. Participants will leave with resources and ideas for incorporating invention education and IP into their own classrooms.This presentation is suitable for science teachers of all levels, from elementary to high school. No prior knowledge of IP is necessary.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will leave with resources and ideas for incorporating invention and intellectual property education into their classrooms. This presentation is suitable for science teachers of all levels, from elementary to high school. No prior knowledge of IP is necessary.

SPEAKERS:
Kathy Hoppe (STEMisED, Inc: No City, No State), Kathleen Lanman (U.S. Patent and Trademark Office: Alexandria, VA)

5D Assessment: Using student interest & identity to design meaningful, phenomenon-driven tasks for students

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 E


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Interest and identity are key for supporting meaningful science learning for students (NRC, 2012), yet traditional secondary science assessments do not invite students to bring their sensemaking repertoires and interests to assessment tasks. This session shares a research-driven, “five-dimensional” (5D) process for assessment design that grounds students’ interests and identities as co-equal dimensions to the 3 NGSS dimensions. Participants will use 5D Assessment tools to create more meaningful and equitable assessments that better leverage the assets that students bring and support students as knowers and doers of science. Participants will examine features of meaningful, phenomenon-driven assessments and adapt a community survey tool they can use in classrooms to elicit information about their students’ interests and identities. We will share how they can use this information to guide the development of a “5D” assessment.

TAKEAWAYS:
Educators engage with the 5-D Assessment Project's tools to elicit and use information about students' interests and identities to design meaningful, phenomenon-driven assessment opportunities. Work with examples of meaningful assessment aligned to the elements of the NGSS.

SPEAKERS:
Abraham Lo (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO), Sara Cooper (University of Colorado Boulder: Boulder, CO)

Turn Up the Discussion - Increasing the Quality and Quantity of Discussion in the Science Classroom

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 H


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The negotiation and construction of scientific ideas through talk is a central part of the science learning described in the Framework for K-12 Science. Discussion is the glue that connects science and engineering practices to one another, and it connects those practices to disciplinary core ideas and cross-cutting concepts. But just because it is a key part of the vision, making it a reality in the classroom isn't always easy. In this session, we will dig into the types of discussions and approaches for ensuring they are equitable and meaningful. We will share planning tools, and teaching moves that will support science discussion. Participants will engage in discussion, analyze classroom videos and plan for how they may implement aspects in their own classrooms.

TAKEAWAYS:
Discussion is the way that a classroom community makes sense of what it is investigating, and there are tools and approaches that teachers can use to ensure that all students have access to this sensemaking.

SPEAKERS:
Matt Krehbiel (OpenSciEd: New York, NY)

Selecting Anchoring Phenomena for Equitable 3D Teaching (Part 1 of 2)

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 D


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

N/A

TAKEAWAYS:
Phenomena is foundational to science and intellectual pursuits in general! Come make sense of the idea and think about how phenomena-based instruction can engage your students in meaningful learning.

SPEAKERS:
Bill Penuel (: Boulder, CO), Tiffany Neill (Research Scientist: Oklahoma City, OK)

Hands-On Learning for a More Just Climate

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

In this workshop, participants will learn strategies for leading meaningful conversations around climate justice topics with young audiences. Students come to school with a variety of prior experiences and understandings about climate change and justice topics. Understanding where your students are and their willingness for and openness to having conversations around ideas of fairness, equity, and justice is key to creating a safe and nurturing environment where students will willingly participate in potentially uncomfortable conversations. In this session, we will discuss the various approaches we have taken to introduce climate justice to 6th grade students while supporting diverse backgrounds, experiences, and readiness for these conversations. Attendees will learn about strategies and participate in hands-on activities that have led to a successful teaching and learning environment where students feel empowered by knowledge to seek positive change in their own communities.

TAKEAWAYS:
In this workshop, participants will learn strategies for leading meaningful conversations around climate justice with youth. We will showcase various approaches to teaching climate justice to 6th graders while supporting diverse backgrounds, experiences, and readiness for these conversations.

SPEAKERS:
Bess Caplan (Howard County Conservancy: Woodstock, MD)

Using the SEP’s in a Science Investigation for Exploring Diversity Equity and Inclusion

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2206


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

During this workshop small group work with pill bugs set the stage for exploring the SEP’s through a discovery-based investigation. An anonymous poll will be taken at the beginning of the workshop to identify JEDI (justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion) hurdles teachers are facing. During the investigation, technology and non-technology based methods will be explored. After the investigation, participants will share in a facilitated discussion on modes of dismantling barriers. Review handouts of SEP’s & CCC’s identified and applied during the investigation will compliment elementary level DCI’s. Discussion will drive beyond just the facts of finding an answer to the investigation question, but to take an examination into knowledge of helping illustrate how the SEP’s and CCC’s can serve as an entry point at the elementary level to build science literacy and help move us beyond just facts but deepen our understanding and discovery of the world around us.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers struggle with access and affordability when designing discovery-based investigations. With minimal to no cost, this ready-to-use complete elementary LS investigation will demonstrate ways to increase equity in science sensemaking practices through standards-based hands-on investigations.

SPEAKERS:
Kim Burnett (American University: Washington, DC), Ollie Bogdon (Missouri Western State University: Saint Joseph, MO)

Using Modeling to Support Chemistry Storylines

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Basie Ballroom C


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Models engage students, promote critical thinking, and help students connect abstract concepts to real-world phenomena. This session will promote using the science and engineering practice of developing and using models as a technique to explore concepts, promote sense making, and demonstrate student understanding. Presenters will include modeling techniques that have been successfully used in both rural and urban chemistry classrooms to help students better understand complex concepts within storyline units. The use of simulations, hands-on activities, physical manipulatives, drawings, and technology will be demonstrated. The benefits of models used as an equitable tool will be examined using student data and examples. Sample chemistry storylines will be used to show how student coherence builds throughout the unit with the use of models. Strategies for teachers will be provided to help students develop better models, and a discussion of formative assessment value will be stressed.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will leave with various modeling strategies to implement into their chemistry courses. This will promote student sensemaking and more equitable evaluations of student ideas.

SPEAKERS:
Jennifer Jones (Ogallala High School: Ogallala, NE), Christine Gustafson (Millard South High School: Omaha, NE)

Selecting Anchoring Phenomena for Equitable 3D Teaching (Part 2 of 2)

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 D


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

N/A

TAKEAWAYS:
Phenomena is foundational to science and intellectual pursuits in general! This session helps you understand powerful qualities of phenomena and how they can support meaningful student investigations in and out of the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Bill Penuel (: Boulder, CO), Tiffany Neill (Research Scientist: Oklahoma City, OK)

Making Physics Engaging & Accessible for All Students (even those who struggle with math)

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Jay McShann B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

My first years of teaching Physics at Title 1 schools in Memphis were challenging. Many of my students were very behind, especially in math. However, I developed 5 strategies to make learning physics accessible and they completely transformed my classroom. 1. “Building Block” Method The biggest breakthrough in my classroom was breaking long problems down into building blocks. I will show how to do this with a sample forces unit. 2. Pre-manipulated equations I will share an equation sheet that shows all forms of each equation. It is a game-changer for students who struggle with algebra. 3. Setting-Up for Success I will model a consistent way to help students stay organized on different types of problems. 4. Simplifying Motion I will illustrate how to solve motion problems using simpler notation and simpler equations. 5. Simplifying Circuits I will show how to use the “routes method” so students can solve most circuits in a more conceptual way.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will come away from this session with strategies that they can immediately implement in their classrooms to make physics more accessible and engaging, especially for their lower-level learners.

SPEAKERS:
Jack Replinger (FormerTeacher / Founder: , WA)

How Do You Encourage Scientific Discourse?

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 1501 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: Great Minds

In this workshop, participants discover ways to prepare for collaborative conversations with strategies like targeted questioning, talk moves, and instructional routines. Participants then practice applying these strategies to promote effective science discourse in a three-dimensional classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Sally Robichaux (Great Minds: Washington, DC)

The Importance of Problematizing in 3D Assessments for Student Engagement & Sensemaking

Friday, October 27 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Positioning phenomena and problems in ways that elicit sensemaking from students requires that they are problematized—in other words, that phenomena are presented in a way that highlights a productive uncertainty for students to figure out. Sensemaking requires that there is something authentically uncertain to the students engaged with the task in which they need to make sense of. When a phenomenon-based scenario is problematized, it enables sensemaking by focusing thinking on an authentic, productive uncertainty central to the phenomenon that requires the targeted dimensions (i.e., assessment targets) to figure out. In this session, participants will analyze examples of highly compelling tasks that support problematizing by students as they represent their sensemaking. The resources and processes shared in this session are applicable to K-12 science learning. The session will be interactive.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will engage with a range of assessment scenarios to figure out what it means for a task to be problematized.

SPEAKERS:
Sara Cooper (University of Colorado Boulder: Boulder, CO), Dawn Novak (Science Educator: Grayslake, IL)

Stop Reinventing the Wheel: Utilizing OER Performance Tasks to Make Student Learning Visible

Friday, October 27 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2209


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Too often teachers spend valuable time creating performance tasks in science to encourage sensemaking in their students and to make student thinking more visible. This session will highlight available OER resources that have been compiled across multiple sites. Using these tasks as a starting point, participants will explore ways to adapt these tasks to meet the needs of their classroom. Participants will learn strategies for increasing rigor, providing different levels of support, and providing opportunities to increase student engagement through student voice and choice.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants in this session will leave with an understanding of the OER tasks available for classroom use and strategies to adapt these tasks for their classroom. Strategies will include examples of support for scaffolding, giving meaningful feedback, and increasing student voice and choice.

SPEAKERS:
Kelley Aitken (Winchester Public Schools: Winchester, VA)

Organizing Classroom Talk to Hear All Students’ Ideas: Equity-focused 3D Formative Assessment Through Talk

Friday, October 27 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 D


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

N/A

TAKEAWAYS:
The goal of this session is to support teachers in understanding how best to meet the needs of all learners by starting from where students are at and drawing on their intuitive ideas and real world experiences to inform instruction. All strategies are framed as equitable 3-D formative assessment.

SPEAKERS:
Kelsie Fowler (University of Washington: Seattle, WA), Deb Morrison (Educator and Learning Scientist: Seattle, WA)

What is it like to teach with OpenSciEd High School? A teachers' panel discussion

Friday, October 27 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 H



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
What is it like to teach with OpenSciEd High School A teachers' panel discussion-1.pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Building classroom culture is essential for students to collectively make sense of phenomena. Students need to buy into the idea that each of their ideas is crucial for pushing the class forward. In this session, we highlight strategies for co-creating community agreements. We also report on challenges we have encountered in our classrooms, which strategies we have found to be successful, and which tend to turn students off. We highlight how, as culture challenges arise throughout the year, we can return to these community agreements to reground our classroom. The facilitator will begin the session with a brief overview of OpenSciEd’s view of the teacher's role in instruction and community-building, which will then be followed with a guided panel featuring experienced teachers in using storylines, and finally open Q&A.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will understand how community agreements and other strategies are used in OpenSciEd and other high school classrooms to support collective and equitable sensemaking.

SPEAKERS:
Dan Voss (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Kerri Wingert (Good Question Research: Boulder, CO), Rachel Patton (Denver Public Schools), Nina Blanton (Educator: , MO), Calvin Atkins (Bellingham High School: Bellingham, WA), Sarah Evans (Olathe South High School: Olathe, KS)

Working Smarter not Harder - Grading that's Good for Students and Teachers

Friday, October 27 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 H


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

As educators shift their teaching practice to align with the Framework for K-12 Science and the NGSS, they face various challenges and barriers. One pressing challenge is how to align their new approach to teaching and learning with existing assessment and grading systems. In this session, we will provide examples of 3D assessments and associated scoring guidance. Participants will review student work for these sample assessments and identify evidence of understanding. They will collaborate with others in the session and determine how they would give grades based on set criteria. The second part of the session will highlight different approaches to grading based on local grading expectations (e.g., standards-based grading, daily grade requirements, or 100 point-based systems). Participants will leave the session with approaches to assessment and grading that support student sensemaking and honor the diverse resources students bring to the classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
The process of giving feedback and assigning grades is easier when there are strong materials and assessments to build from, and technology can help make it faster without decreasing effectiveness for students.

SPEAKERS:
Matt Krehbiel (OpenSciEd: New York, NY)

Resources for Engaging in Climate Justice Centered Teaching and Learning Strand: Teaching strategies for classroom practice

Friday, October 27 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 D


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Designers and writers from the well known STEM Teaching Tools collection (www.stemteachingtools.org), a free repository of resources that reference other national resources funded by the NSF and created by national leaders in climate science and education, have developed a branch of resources called the ClimateEdTools which provide learning pathways for educators as well as strategies for use in youth centered learning contexts. Come and explore these resources with us as we examine the deeply intersectional socio-ecological issues facing our world and how to teach about them. In this workshop we will explore how to engage in science instruction that centers local climate justice phenomena to teach climate science standards. In addition, we will workshop how educators may apply this collection of resources to meet the needs they have in their own teaching and learning contexts.

TAKEAWAYS:
Climate Ed Tools contain rich examples of climate justice instruction, strategies for engaging youth, and to support climate change learning and communication among educators. These open education resources (OER) include video overviews, valuable guidance educators, and tons of background resources!

SPEAKERS:
Philip Bell (University of Washington: Seattle, WA), Deb Morrison (Educator and Learning Scientist: Seattle, WA), Kelsie Fowler (University of Washington: Seattle, WA)

Standards Based Grading for Equity in HS Chemistry

Friday, October 27 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Standards-based grading shifts the focus from traditional grades to a mastery of specific learning objectives. SBG is a comprehensive approach that focuses on identifying and communicating clear learning objectives to students and assessing their progress based on these objectives. We will discuss how SBG can be used in a chemistry classroom to promote student learning outcomes throughout sample storylines. We will explore the benefits of using SBG, including increased student engagement, motivation, and ownership of learning. We will also discuss the challenges of implementing SBG and strategies to overcome them. By attending this presentation, chemistry educators will gain a better understanding of how SBG can promote student learning outcomes for ALL students in their classrooms. They will also gain practical ideas and strategies for implementing SBG in their own chemistry classrooms.

TAKEAWAYS:
Standards-based grading doesn't have to be scary or time intensive. Teachers will learn how SBG strategies can be used in the classroom to make assessing NGSS storylines equitable and centered on learning.

SPEAKERS:
Christine Gustafson (Millard South High School: Omaha, NE)

Reimagining Exit Tickets

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Engage in a mini design sprint to develop curriculum-aligned exit tickets. Together, we will use an equity framework and Universal Design to create exit tickets that support equitable sensemaking and 3-D science learning. We will coach you through a process to develop exit tickets that assess your students’ experiences and sensemaking. This workshop will focus on areas that support their learning such as: metacognition and reflection, applying their learning to a new phenomenon, connecting to their experiences and expertise outside of the classroom, and student experience in the learning environment. We will bring in examples of curriculum-anchored assessment using open source curricula. You will walk away with a set of exit tickets to assess student experience in 3-D learning that will give you information to inform instruction and support equitable classroom assessment practices.

TAKEAWAYS:
Gathering evidence of student experiences through short assessment opportunities can help build meaningful relationships with students and provide rich information to inform instructional moves.

SPEAKERS:
Calvin Atkins (Bellingham High School: Bellingham, WA), Colleen LaMotte (Middle School Science Teacher: Shorline, WA), Jenna Mobley (: White Salmon, WA)

Equity and Social Justice in Space: Visioning culturally sustaining astronomy education (using an example from OpenSciEd Middle School)

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 H


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

In this workshop we will work through the "anchoring phenomenon" from the OpenSciEd Middle School space unit, which helps students see the relevance of astronomy by drawing on traditional indigenous astronomy knowledge, and students' own cultural knowledge to engage students in identifying and explaining patterns in the sky that set the rhythm for our lives. Participants will get a chance to experience the anchoring phenomenon, and share their own experience, expertise and ideas, to begin visioning how astronomy education can draw on student and community resources, connect students to traditional knowledge from around the world, and build on natural curiosity about questions that are older than Western history.

TAKEAWAYS:
Anchoring astronomy instruction in phenomena that invite connections between science and students' identities can support culturally sustaining pedagogy in the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Zoe Buck Bracey (Senior Science Educator and Director of Design for Justice: Colorado Springs, CO), Thomas Clayton (K-5 STEAM Specialist: Berkeley Heights, NJ), Jamie Noll (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO)

Teaching Science to Support Caring Ecological Relationships and Practices

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 D


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Ecological systems have been damaged by humans. Science can be used to guide responses and support the thriving of species. Science education tends to reflect Western perspectives, including the view of humans as separate from and exerting control over nature. However, science learning can build from caring, relational orientations toward multispecies worlds and socio-ecologically just and thriving systems. We must engage learners in ways that highlight these webs of interdependence and support learners in responding to complex human-nature ecosystem dynamics. In this session, we will explore strategies and examples of science learning that cultivate caring ecological relationships, including firsthand experiences of learning by engaging with and investigating land and water systems. We will draw on co-designed resources from STEM Teaching Tools (www.stemteachingtools.org) and Learning in Places (learninginplaces.org) to support these experiences.

TAKEAWAYS:
Human-nature relationships are culturally and historically rooted and are embedded in approaches to science teaching and learning. Supporting reciprocal and caring human-nature relationships leads to socio-ecologically just and thriving systems—and aligns with NGSS 3-D learning.

SPEAKERS:
Philip Bell (University of Washington: Seattle, WA), Kelsie Fowler (University of Washington: Seattle, WA), Nancy Price (University of Washington: Seattle, WA)

'So a teacher walks into a classroom…' bringing identity and belonging through story to the classroom

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2202


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

During this workshop, the presenters will use improv techniques and connection Jenga to build identity, culture, and story for the classroom. Goals of this presentation are to: -empower individuals to feel they can speak up and contribute by sharing their own stories -engage attendees in an innovative, creative way by building inclusive, interactive bridges through play -ensure a safe environment where people feel comfortable in understanding that everyone has bias -assemble diverse teams who will collaborate to create action plans to share resources back in their districts and states

TAKEAWAYS:
Addressing bias, creating efficacy, and clarifying accessible, diverse, equitable, and inclusive leadership are the primary goals of this workshop.

SPEAKERS:
Kelly Day (Department of Energy: No City, No State), Amy Szczepanski (Einstein Fellow: New York, DC), Melissa Thompson (Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship: No City, No State), Michael Stewart (Stonewall Jackson High School: Manassas, VA), Kelsey Beeghly (Einstein Fellow: Altamonte Springs, FL), Jacquelyn Southerland (Accokeek Academy: Accokeek, MD)

Effective Discourse Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science & STEM Classrooms

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Resource Collection
This link will take you to a Google Doc with all resources used to develop this hands-on workshop.

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

This presentation is designed to help teachers deepen their understanding of the effective and practical strategies to facilitate academic discourse that promotes inclusive science and STEM classrooms. Participants will engage in a variety of instructional strategies to ensure that all students have access to scientific discourse and opportunities to collaborate with peers through intentional planning. Participants will engage in a variety of formative assessment classroom techniques (FACTS) from Page Keeley’s Uncovering Student Ideas texts, including commit and toss, sticky bars, structured think-pair-share, and more. In addition, we will be discussing the shift away from traditional talk patterns-- like I-R-E (Initiate, Response, Evaluation) and towards Productive Talk to promote an inclusive science and STEM classroom. Finally, participants will leave with a virtual toolbox of resources for additional discourse strategies they can immediately apply in their classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will leave with a deeper understanding of shifts in classroom talk patterns, like moving away from the I-R-E talk pattern and towards Productive Talk. Attendees will engage with practical and effective discourse strategies that promote inclusive and productive classroom discourse.

SPEAKERS:
Rebecca Garelli (Arizona Science Teachers Association)

How to Tend to 3-D Student Work

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Use our new Tending to Student Work Workbook to analyze student work and see how student work can be used to inform instruction, revise feedback and scoring guides, and inform revisions to assessment tasks. Together we will develop an understanding of what it means to tend to student work in caring ways by figuring out what we need to see in student work and how to see student work through an asset-based lens seeking all facets of student thinking. We will work together to find value in student’s non-target thinking and leverage this thinking. Teachers from Washington’s S.A.G.E. project will share their experiences of tending to student work and the impact it has had on their teaching, learning, and assessment. The session will be interactive.

TAKEAWAYS:
Recognizing the assets students bring to an assessment task is critical for understanding how to move their thinking forward. Leave with tools you can use in your classroom to tend to student work in caring ways that lead to stronger relationships.

SPEAKERS:
Calvin Atkins (Bellingham High School: Bellingham, WA), Colleen LaMotte (Middle School Science Teacher: Shorline, WA), Jenna Mobley (: White Salmon, WA)

Assessing 3D Understanding using the NSTA Student Work Analysis Protocol - Secondary

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 C


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Participants will gain experience evaluating student learning across the three dimensions using authentic student work samples. Discussion will focus on lesson-level three-dimensional performance expectations and what counts as evidence of student understanding for the three dimensions targeted by the assessment task. We will also use data collected from these student work examples to identify patterns/trends teachers can use to inform instruction to ensure all students have access to science learning.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants gain experience using the NSTA Student Work Analysis Protocol (open educational resource) and can share the protocol and application with colleagues in their school/district.

SPEAKERS:
Zoe Evans (Bremen City Schools: Bremen, GA), Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Increasing Sensemaking in Gender and Minority Populations Through Innovative Learning Communities

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2207


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

In understanding how cultural bias affects underrepresented populations, teachers as change agents can design learning communities to increase peer collaboration for gender and minority populations. As students interact with each other, teachers provide the cultural tools needed for students to take on the role as a scientist or engineer. We will explore the essential components for framing innovative learning communities for underrepresented STEM populations. First, we will analyze intentionality in selecting cooperative learning structures for making learning targets through different scenarios. Second, we will conduct a reading jigaw on the importance of peer collaboration for increased diversity. Third, we will analyze lesson planning for learning communities using student work samples, videos, and instructional strategies and techniques. Lastly, educators will reflect on sensemaking through collaboration in a group summary.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers as change agents provide the cultural tools to affect learning communities. This session will provide tools and techniques to improve sensemaking through peer collaboration for gender and minority populations.

SPEAKERS:
Leslie Birdon (Richwood High School: Monroe, LA)

What Role Does Feedback And Grading Play In Equitable 3-D Science Classrooms?

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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Come experience ways to appraise student work transparently that supports and encourages students wanting to continue the sensemaking process as opposed to thinking an assessment is the end of the learning process. We will begin by looking at multiple pieces of student assessment work, looking for the facets of understanding they present in their work. We will consider different methods of providing feedback and the impact on sensemaking and learning these different methods result in. We will look at different tools that have been created over the last five years to support students actively participating in the appraisal process. Participants will use the experience to begin thinking about the shifts in their appraisal system they would like to try with their students. Teachers from Washington’s S.A.G.E. project will share their experiences of reimagining the purpose of feedback and grading student work, and the impact it has had on their teaching, learning, and assessment.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will engage with authentic student work and consider different methods of providing feedback that is equitable and supports students wanting to share where they are in their sensemaking. Participants will leave with some ‘tools’ they can use in their classroom to provide caring collaboration.

SPEAKERS:
Jenna Mobley (: White Salmon, WA), Colleen LaMotte (Middle School Science Teacher: Shorline, WA), Calvin Atkins (Bellingham High School: Bellingham, WA)

Climate kNOWledge: Bringing Climate Science and Climate Justice Conversations to the Classroom

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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Climate kNOWledge engages all 6th grade students from the Howard County Public School system (MD) in learning about and understanding climate science and climate justice through a 45-day science unit. The goal of Climate kNOWledge is to bring current climate science into the classroom while helping students understand the disproportionate impacts climate change has on communities worldwide. Students participate in two field experiences; a schoolyard data collection where hands on protocols help them understand specific climate phenomena like the urban heat island effect, and an offsite field trip to learn about climate change solutions. The unit culminates in student-led action projects that are grounded in evidence-based reasoning and address a local climate change impact. This session will provide an overview of the new Climate kNOWledge unit and will discuss strategies for leading meaningful and educational conversations around climate justice topics with young audiences.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn strategies for leading conversations about climate justice with students. We will showcase activities, case studies, and other tools that lead to successful learning environments where students feel empowered by knowledge to seek positive changes in their own communities.

SPEAKERS:
Bess Caplan (Howard County Conservancy: Woodstock, MD)

Making Sense of STEM in PreK

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Making Sense of STEM in Pre-K
NSTA KC 23

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Pre-K students have brains that are developing quickly and making rapid connections. This session explores sense-making and equitability in PreK, encouraging a love of learning in the young child. At McKissick Academy of Science and Technology, we utilize our Engineering Design Process to engage students in critical thinking, planning, revision, and communication through STEM. Our tools include: Project Lead the Way, Engineering is Elementary, Picture-Perfect STEM, Creative Curriculum, and our own teachers’ Project Based Learning units to further develop their brains. Our school believes in making learning equitable by providing access to STEM education for all our students; not just the upper grades. Join us for a session where you can walk away with some confidence to start your own units that will directly apply to your littles.

TAKEAWAYS:
The way STEM, and the EDP are embedded into Pre-K environments in our school meets the needs of early intervention and provides equitable access to education for children prior to beginning kindergarten.

SPEAKERS:
Angela Spearman (McKissick Academy of Science & Technology: Easley, SC), Brittany Clark (McKissick Academy: Easley, SC), Morgan Stancil (Teacher: Easley, SC)

Engage Students in Rich Discourse

Saturday, October 28 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2503 B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: PEER Physics

Are you passionate about engaging students in rich discourse and looking for strategies, norms, and protocols that can support this work? Join us for an interactive workshop to explore effective small-group and whole-class discourse techniques. Participants receive consensus building protocols.

SPEAKERS:
Emily Quinty (University of Colorado Boulder: Boulder, CO)

Assessing 3-D Understanding Using the NSTA Student Work Analysis Protocol -- Elementary

Saturday, October 28 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 C


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Participants will gain experience evaluating student learning across the three dimensions using authentic student work samples. Discussion will focus on lesson-level three-dimensional performance expectations and what counts as evidence of student understanding for the three dimensions targeted by the assessment task. We will also use data collected from these student work examples to identify patterns/trends teachers can use to inform instruction to ensure all students have access to science learning.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants gain experience using the NSTA Student Work Analysis Protocol (open educational resource) and can share the protocol and application with colleagues in their school/district.

SPEAKERS:
Zoe Evans (Bremen City Schools: Bremen, GA), Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

How to Design Justice-Focused 3D Assessments in Science

Saturday, October 28 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 D


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

N/A

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn about a detailed 9-step process for conceiving, developing, testing, refining, and using 3-D science assessments focused on social justice phenomena and topics. Open education resources that support this assessment development process will also be shared. #NSFfunded

SPEAKERS:
Philip Bell (University of Washington: Seattle, WA), Bill Penuel (: Boulder, CO)

Engaging in Argumentation Around Complex Socioscientific Decision-Making: Using the Learning in Places Framework in OpenSciEd High School Physics

Saturday, October 28 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 H



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Argumentation in P3 NSTA KC 2023- uploaded to NSTA.pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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The Framework calls for students to engage in argumentation from evidence in a way that considers relevant social, ethical, and environmental tradeoffs that cannot be resolved without considering the values of interested parties. As educators, we need to honor students’ diverse experiences and value systems while also engaging students in the process of respectful scientific argumentation. OpenSciEd High School uses the Learning in Places Framework to inform the design of an argumentation tool for students to guide them through the process of weighing science ideas, societal and environmental impacts, and ethical considerations when evaluating potentially controversial arguments and design solutions. Join us to engage with an adapted version of this argumentation process. Participants will explore the Learning in Places Framework for Socio Ecological Decision Making and discuss use of the Learning in Places Framework within the classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
The NGSS calls for students to weigh complex socioscientific tradeoffs, including social, cultural, and environmental impacts. The Learning in Places Framework can be used to help structure student engagement in argumentation that requires decision-making around these tradeoffs.

SPEAKERS:
Whitney Mills (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO), Laura Zeller (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO)

Supporting All Students Make Sense of Phenomena By Building All of Their Intellectual Resources

Saturday, October 28 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 D


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The Framework and NGSS vision calls for creating opportunities for ALL students to meaningfully engage in sensemaking and learning in science. A culturally responsive approach to instruction highlights the range of intellectual resources that students bring to learning situations based on their cultural histories. Intellectual resources such as student language, perspective, gestures, and prior knowledge are classroom assets. Through a series of concrete accounts of learning situations, this session will create opportunities for participants to work with others to ‘learn to see’ students’ sense-making resources—and connect these pedagogical strategies to their own classroom practice. We frame this approach through an equity and justice framework for culturally responsive instruction centered in the NRC Framework for K-12 Science Education, which posits that science learning should be rooted in students’ ways of being and ways of knowing.

TAKEAWAYS:
Culturally responsive education supports student sensemaking and learning in science. Inclusive science strategies help teachers learn to see students’ diverse sensemaking resources. These methods help us create and adapt curriculum that is equitable and centered on justice.

SPEAKERS:
Philip Bell (University of Washington: Seattle, WA)

Foster Collaboration and Inclusion Using Science Practices

Saturday, October 28 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2503 B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: PEER Physics

Join us for an interactive workshop to explore how science practices can be used to build a more inclusive and engaging learning environment. Participants will explore the PEER Physics Learning Cycle and gain access to a phenomenon-driven Waves unit for high school physics and physical science.

SPEAKERS:
Emily Quinty (University of Colorado Boulder: Boulder, CO)

Making Sense of STEM in Pre-K

Saturday, October 28 • 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Share-a-thon Area



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Making Sense of STEM in Pre-K
NSTA KC23

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Our EDP process and STEM practices provide students with words (to develop thinking, promote planning, etc.). We support our students with an equitable, safe, and developmentally appropriate environment to foster a place for students to learn, experience failed ideas, and move toward success.

TAKEAWAYS:
The way STEM and the EDP are embedded into Pre-K environments in our school meets the needs of early intervention and provides equitable access to education for children prior to beginning kindergarten.

SPEAKERS:
Brittany Clark (McKissick Academy: Easley, SC)

Health DataWell - A curriculum designed to utilize real-world data, and case studies, focusing on public health and/or environmental health issues

Saturday, October 28 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Presenting on the NSTA/HESI (Health and Environmental Sciences Insitute) partnership curriculum - Health DataWell. To understand the varied roles of citizens and health scientists in protecting and promoting the health and wellness of their communities This curriculum is designed for teachers to use with high-school level science students and can be freely accessed and implemented by teachers anywhere in the world. The program content is aligned with common educational standards of learning (SOLs) in the US but is not specific to any State. At present the curriculum will only be offered in English, but future iterations may include translation into other languages.

TAKEAWAYS:
Students will build skills and knowledge in three primary focus areas: data analysis and visualization, social and environmental determinants of health, and increasing awareness of careers and civic roles in societal health protection.

SPEAKERS:
Raechel Puglisi (Scientific Program Manager: Washington, DC)

Adapting Open Education Resources (OER) Instructional Materials to Connect to Local Phenomena and Priorities

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 D


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

N/A

TAKEAWAYS:
Leave with practical strategies and resources to adapt OER materials effectively, making science education more culturally relevant, engaging, and impactful for their students.

SPEAKERS:
Bill Penuel (: Boulder, CO), Lindsey Mohan (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO), Tiffany Neill (Research Scientist: Oklahoma City, OK)

Hands-on Titrations Anywhere: Teaching Inquiry and Scientific Practices with Paper Microfluidics

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2502 B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Hands-on lab experiments are crucial for students to develop proficiency with the science and engineering practices in the Next Generation Science Standards, but traditional labs often require hazardous materials, expensive equipment, long lab times, and dedicated facilities, leaving them out of reach for many schools. Paper microfluidics provides a safe, low-cost, and easy-to-use platform to do hands-on chemistry experiments without specialized equipment or lab spaces. MICRO Project experiments use paper microfluidics to teach inquiry-based chemistry labs. Each MICRO lab is designed to engage students in science and engineering practices and includes instructor notes, customizable pre- and post-lab questions, student procedures, and background on a relevant issue of equity and justice. These labs have been used by thousands of students at universities, community colleges, and middle and high schools. Workshop attendees will perform a MICRO titration lab.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how to integrate authentic scientific practices into safe, hands-on, low-cost lab experiments.

SPEAKERS:
Rachel Roller (PhD Candidate: Mishawaka, IN)

Implementing ELL Strategies in Science

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2208


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

During this presentation topics such as creating language objectives, color-coding vocabulary, using graphic organizers to help further comprehension of content, and using the expert readers strategy will be covered.

TAKEAWAYS:
Various strategies for scientific literacy that are easily applicable to any science classroom such as using language objectives, graphic organizers, and color-coding key vocabulary.

SPEAKERS:
Mikayla Kagey (Central Kitsap Middle School: Silverdale, WA), Sydnie Chouery (Science Teacher: Silverdale, WA)

Creating and Sustaining a Virtual Professional Learning Community

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2202



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Slides
Slides used to guide the discussion during the presentation. Associated links (website, resources, etc.) can be found embedded in the slides.

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Come see a successful online professional learning model that promotes collaboration around universal problems of practice. Each session allows educators to learn about new strategies implemented in classrooms, debrief in job-alike roles, share resources, and develop a plan to refine their practice.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will gain access to tools and resources for use in classrooms from both a teacher and instructional coaching role, as well as work on how they might make use of these resources for their own learning, learning within their own PLCs, or to develop a community of their own.

SPEAKERS:
Amy Johannsen (Southeast Polk High School: Pleasant Hill, IA), Jason Martin-Hiner (Keystone Area Education Agency: Elkader, IA)

Engaging in climate science education through connections to everyday life, equity, and justice

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 D


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Climate science education is foundational for all learners given our changing lands and waters. These changes vary across the landscape and thus we also need to learn about the differential way in which climate change is impacting people across different contexts. Often the most marginalized peoples are the first impacted. This session will explore ways to teach about climate science that provide insight into the lived experiences and current adaptations of those most impacted by climate change. Tools for engaging in conversations around such inequities, curriculum resources, and ways to engage in solutions centered action research with students will all be explored. We will draw on emerging resources being built within the STEM Teaching Tools collection (www.stemteachingtools.org), a free repository of resources that reference other national resources funded by the NSF and created by national leaders in climate science and education.

TAKEAWAYS:
Strategies for engaging in climate change and climate justice learning appropriate to grade band NGSS standards, climate and energy literacy standards, and for both school and community-based learning contexts.

SPEAKERS:
Philip Bell (University of Washington: Seattle, WA), Kelsie Fowler (University of Washington: Seattle, WA), Deb Morrison (Educator and Learning Scientist: Seattle, WA)

Equity through Immersive STEAM events

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2101



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Presentation Agenda
Science Day Planning Tool
SLide Presentation

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

STEAM is an endeavor in which everyone can engage. It is fun. Each and every one of us can be a scientist in some way. Reimagining the science fair is one way to bring together our community - students, teachers, parents, and professionals in a fun, relevant, and collaborative way. The underlying principle for the day is that science does not exist in isolation. Multiple stakeholders are part of the process at every step of the way. The Science Day event gives students a platform to hear about the formative experiences of science and engineering professionals, engage in team-building activities, and immerse themselves in their own maker project. All aspects of the day allow students to function like real scientists and engineers.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will be provided a template for organizing a successful school-wide STEAM event. Using this template, attendees will begin identifying resources and planning for their event.

SPEAKERS:
Susan Bartol (Hillside Elementary School: Montclair, NJ)

Effectively Use Phenomena that Highlights the Lived Experiences and Narratives of Diverse Scientists in Biology Lessons

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2502 A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
An Interdisciplinary Investigation of African Rock Art Images to Learn about Sci
Visibility In STEM
Visibility In STEM
YouTube Channel: Visibility In STEM

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The need for student identification and belonging in the scientific community begins in the biology curriculum. This requires the use of scientific practices to facilitate sensemaking that supports equitable classroom practices and equitable science content and pedagogy. This presentation provides examples of engaging phenomena that highlight the lived experiences and narratives of diverse scientists and that supports meaningful inclusion in the classroom. This presentation also focuses on the rationale and benefits to teachers and students for developing equity-mindedness for meaningful inclusion. These lesson ideas and strategies are supported by the three dimensions of the Next Generational Science Standards. Attendees will learn how to help students engage in critical thinking skills, learn science, and build understandings related to the social and cultural nature of science. Connections to the three dimensions of STEM will be made. This presentation draws funded projects.

TAKEAWAYS:
Use engaging phenomena from diverse scientists alongside inquiry and argumentation to engage in scientific practices and scientific text, supported by the NGSS three dimensions of STEM. Connections to Common Core and equitable classroom practices are made.

SPEAKERS:
Catherine Quinlan (Howard University)

STEAM-Powered Stoichiometry: Where Art and Chemistry Converge

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2502 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA 2023 STEAM STOICHIOMETRY PROJECT.docx
Unit worksheet for STEAM Stoichiometry Project
NSTA 2023 STEAM WORKSHOP PPT.pptx
STEAM Stoichiometry Workshop Powerpoint File
STEaM Stoichiometry Image

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Stoichiometry is a topic that many teacher find difficult to teach and for many students, difficult to learn. In this project-based workshop, students will learn stoichiometry principles from the perspective of making paint. Paints are made up of three components: a pigment, a binder, and a thinner. In the water-based paint created in this module, the binder is calcium carbonate, an insoluble precipitate made from the double-displacement reaction between aqueous solutions of calcium chloride and sodium carbonate. When mixed in stoichiometric amounts, an insoluble precipitate, calcium carbonate, forms. Students use stoichiometry to quantify the correct amounts of aqueous reactants to make a desired amount of binder, then mix their own paint using pigment and water as a thinner. The project culminates in a class quilt made up of students' individually painted tiles.

TAKEAWAYS:
Stoichiometry does not have to be an anxiety-producing, tear-jerking unit. When taught in chewable chunks, students gain an appreciation for its importance in daily life. In this workshop, students learn concepts that are tied to an end-product art project.

SPEAKERS:
Caroline Gochoco-Tsuyuki (Archbishop Riordan High School: San Francisco, CA)

STEM Teaching Tools: Free Resources to Support Equitable 3D Science Instruction

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 D


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

STEM educators around the country are working to implement the new vision in the NRC Framework for K-12 Science Education and the resulting Next Generation Science Standards, in addition to the many other initiatives that compete for their time and resources. At the same time, much of the research around improving STEM learning does not make it into the classroom. Research can often lack context and clear connections to everyday teaching practice or learning experiences, and relevant tools and strategies can be hard for educators to find or access. To bridge that gap, the team at the UW Institute for Science + Math Education is working with teachers and researchers to create a suite of accessible, bite-sized practice briefs called STEM Teaching Tools. In this session, we’ll explore the suite of tools and explore how to use them to dive into topics in science education.

TAKEAWAYS:
STEM Teaching Tools is a freely-available collection of practice briefs that contain recommendations and strategies for implementing the vision of the Framework and NGSS. They support fabulous educator professional learning, both individually and in professional learning communities.

SPEAKERS:
Philip Bell (University of Washington: Seattle, WA), Nancy Price (University of Washington: Seattle, WA), Kelsie Fowler (University of Washington: Seattle, WA)

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