2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

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FILTERS APPLIED:Presentation, Students and Sensemaking, General Science

 

Rooms and times subject to change.
67 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

I can't wait for science class! - The How and Why of 3D Phenomenon-Based Learning

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 H


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

In pre-NGSS approaches to science teaching, units were often sequenced based on how experts understand the relationship among concepts. This means that it typically requires an understanding of the concepts being taught to understand why a unit is sequenced the way it is. The result is that the sequence of activities may make sense to a teacher, but doesn’t necessarily make sense to the students. The shift to phenomena-based 3D learning brings the student to the center of the learning and uses their life experiences and approaches to sensemaking to drive the learning. This session will highlight how powerful this shift is for student ownership of learning and general engagement. Additionally, we will describe HOW to make this a reality in classrooms and provide participants with resources and supports to bring this learning to life in their classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
The shift to phenomena-based 3D learning brings the student to the center of the learning and uses their life experiences and approaches to sensemaking to drive the learning forward.

SPEAKERS:
Matt Krehbiel (OpenSciEd: New York, NY)

Claim, Evidence, Reasoning: Often Misunderstood But Inherently Valuable

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2203


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The claim, evidence, reasoning method is a well-researched and effective tool in helping students engage in argumentation. However, in our work with teachers, we find that the method is often not well understood or implemented. In practice, especially in elementary classrooms, teachers are using claim to replace the word hypothesis, leading to the incorrect use of the method. Teachers are also starting by having students make a claim and then evaluating the evidence shown as to provide reasoning. A better way of using the method is to evaluate the evidence, then make a claim, and finally use reasoning to support the claim. We want to help teachers understand the research and how to use the method in their classrooms. Once the background is understood, the teachers will practice the method themselves by gathering evidence from the provided visualizations, writing a claim based on the evidence, and using the evidence along with their own background knowledge as their reasoning.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn where and how to use the claim, evidence, reasoning method and practice using it to make their own reasoned claims based on evidence.

SPEAKERS:
Susan Licher (Cornell Lab of Ornithology: Ithaca, NY)

What is OpenSciEd HS? What are the premises of our instructional model?

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 C


STRAND: Leadership and Advocacy

Show Details

Join us to see how OpenSciEd’s materials can help build science learning experiences anchored in compelling phenomena and in important community and global problems. OpenSciEd high school uses a storyline approach that emphasizes coherence from the student perspective. Participants will explore the curricular routines, discourse strategies, and comprehensive assessment system that support equitable participation

TAKEAWAYS:
OpenSciEd HS's storyline approach, curricular routines, student discourse strategies, and assessment systems work together to help students build equitable science learning experiences.

SPEAKERS:
Zoe Buck Bracey (Senior Science Educator and Director of Design for Justice: Colorado Springs, CO), Michael Novak (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Kate Henson (University of Colorado Boulder: Boulder, CO)

Speaking Like a Scientist Leads to Reading and Writing Like a Scientist!

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2209


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

It's difficult for educators at the primary level to imagine creating “additional time” for science, but when we understand strong language skills provide greater success in reading and writing, we see that science isn't just "one more thing." Science and critical thinking creates opportunities for students to have authentic conversations–which allows us to guide student language in a way that's unmatched! We will include a brief review of SEPs, standards for spoken/written language, and examples for using NGSS DCIs to facilitate student conversations. Ideas for explicitly teaching conversational language skills and behaviors will be shared. Participants will learn ways to combine the use of guided student language and current best practices in literacy instruction along with other ideas that can be used immediately. The session will end with participants developing plans for scientific conversations in their own classrooms, and ideas for how they might guide & build student language.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will be provided with ideas for engaging students in scientific conversations, ideas for guiding student language within those conversations, and ideas for using language to facilitate literacy instruction.

SPEAKERS:
Paige Garrett (Teacher: Nixa, MO), Courtney Mills (John Thomas School of Discovery Partner School: Nixa, MO), Shannon Winkler (John Thomas School of Discovery Partner School: Nixa, MO)

Learn About NSTA’s Digital Resources, Online Community, and Membership

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 G



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA-National-Conference-KC2023-Digital_Resources-Final.pdf

STRAND: Tech Tools

Show Details

Participants will become knowledgeable about the plethora of digital resources available on NSTA’s website, about the live events, member benefits, and the professional learning community that can help them enhance their knowledge and improve their teaching practices. Numerous live events are offered to educators of science every month to enhance and extend their content and pedagogical knowledge -- many of them free to NSTA members and guest users of the NSTA website. Participants will also learn how to engage with other educators of science and grow their network of like-minded individuals. Join us and learn about NSTA's discussion forums and profile page. NSTA staff will be available to answer questions.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will become knowledgeable about the plethora of digital resources available on NSTA’s website, about the live events, member benefits, and the professional learning community that can help them enhance their knowledge and improve their teaching practices.

SPEAKERS:
Michelle Phillips (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Flavio Mendez (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Moonflower Magic: Inclusive Argumentation in the Elementary Classroom

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2210


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Participants will discover how argumentation can support the vision of inclusive instructional strategies across the curriculum. This session will anchor in learning theory and focus on student work examples, including graphic organizers and transcripts, that tell the story of an instructional sequence about pollinators. How the routines of science support learning for literacy and math will be investigated and made explicit. We’ll pull apart the underlying instructional practices evident in the student work for how to plan for engagement, elicit student ideas, support changes in student ideas, and press for complete explanations through argumentation.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will come away with an example of how to structure argumentation in the 4th grade classroom through observing student data organization and student discourse.

SPEAKERS:
Lindsey Roy (Science and Digital Learning Coordinator: Lincoln, NE), Miranda Orellana (Elementary Teacher: Lincoln, NE), Betsy Barent (Lincoln Public Schools: No City, No State)

Elementary Science Olympiad For All – Activity Plans for K-6 Students with Disabilities

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2203



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Science Olympiad Brochures
Science Olympiad Homepage

Show Details

Elementary Science Olympiad for All (ESO for All) provides K-6 students of all ability levels with a dynamic, engaging STEM experience. Many elementary classrooms and schools today are fully inclusive, so Science Olympiad created activity plans for students with disabilities that include individualized accommodations tailored to the following needs: Academic, Communication, Health, Vision/Hearing, Motor (Small and Large), Functional, and Social/Emotional. Come learn how 10 classic Elementary Science Olympiad events we use as a base for the activity plans touch every letter in STEM, are fully aligned to the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and complement any school’s science curriculum. Bugs, rocks, catapults, planes, and towers will spark imagination and creativity; providing opportunities for teamwork, collaboration, and shared successes. You’ll learn insightful advice, like outlining shapes on Monster Cards with glue so that students with sight impairment can use their tactile senses.

TAKEAWAYS:
Join us for a fun-filled look at how classic science activities can be modified to meet all learners whether they are a core part of your instruction, an enhancement (such as a family science night or school science day), after-school club, or a community-engaging STEM competition.

SPEAKERS:
Shari Haug (Science Olympiad: Oakbrook Terrace, IL), John Loehr (Science Olympiad: Oakbrook Terrace, IL)

Our Favorite Unit And How To Teach It

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Introductions[5min] Meet the presenters and share with neighbors to establish networking for discussion and exploration Do Now (5min) Review session objectives and set personal goals The Role of Phenomena in Science Education (5min) Investigate examples of phenomena that lend themselves to strong Science lesson The Importance of Interdisciplinary Units in Science Education (5min) Explore purposeful pairing of learning objectives from a range of content areas Exploration of The Water Princess Unit Plan (30min) Learn about the elements of the unit and the accompanying resources that support strong instruction Identify opportunities for customization and differentiation based on their unique teaching and learning environments and students Science Notebooks - features and strategies (10min) See examples of science notebooks and discuss their impact on student learning Call to Action and Closing Comments (5min) Anchor their session take-aways with the personal goals they set during the Do

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will receive a richly-developed, phenomenon-based unit plan paired with the ‘how to’ of unit planning, strategies for science notebooks, interdisciplinary learning objectives, KLEWS, notice-and-wonder, graphic organizers, and assessment models.

SPEAKERS:
Wendy Amato (UVA | Teaching Channel: No City, No State)

Empowering Parents’ Support for Early Science Through Home-to-School Connections

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2207


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

This presentation will discuss the importance of home-to-school connections in fostering early science opportunities through everyday activities. We explore research on family-school partnerships and the value of incorporating families' experiential knowledge into the curriculum to promote equity and inclusivity in early childhood. The Early Science Framework, an infant, toddler, and preschool adaptation of the Framework for K-12 Science Education, provides a research-based approach to early science learning that connects science to children's everyday lives. We will discuss how teachers can use this framework to create a more dynamic curriculum. Practical resources and ideas for teacher professional development will be provided to support culturally responsive preschool science engagement. By promoting family-school partnerships and bringing research into practice, we can create a more engaging learning environment for children and stronger partnerships between families and schools.

TAKEAWAYS:
We provide resources and examples incorporating experiential knowledge from families into the classroom, connecting children’s learning to their everyday lives. These home-to-school connections provide culturally relevant and equity-informed opportunities for high-quality teaching and learning.

SPEAKERS:
Daryl Greenfield (University of Miami: Miami, FL), Chabely Figuereo (Graduate Student: Coral Gables, FL)

Promoting Student Agency Through Equitable Phenomena

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Handout (Phenomena)
Session Slides (Phenomena).pptx.pdf

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

A collaborative team of teachers and researchers share results from a research project aimed at leveraging compelling and equitable phenomena in NGSS-designed instruction with multilingual learners (MLs). Using our yearlong fifth-grade curriculum, we share our approach to selecting phenomena from both science and equity perspectives. From a science perspective, we ensured that a unit anchoring phenomenon (a) promotes deep science and engineering understanding, (b) integrates science disciplines, (c) sustains a 9-week unit, and (d) raises awareness of societal concerns. From an equity perspective, we ensured that a unit anchoring phenomenon (a) creates relevance for all students, (b) utilizes funds of knowledge, (c) provides context for language, and (d) promotes participation of all students. We focus on the impact of using compelling and equitable phenomena with MLs and present case studies of two teachers who implemented such phenomena across four units over one school year.

TAKEAWAYS:
By using phenomena and problems that meet both science and equity criteria, teachers ensure that all students, especially MLs, have agency to make connections to the world around them, see science as relevant to their lives and future careers, and see themselves as scientists and engineers.

SPEAKERS:
Iovanna Williams (Science Teacher: , NY), Adriana Romanzo (Elementary Science Teacher: New York, NY), Abigail Schwenger (Research Associate)

Learning to be an Ambitious Science Teacher

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2105


STRAND: Leadership and Advocacy

Show Details

In order for teachers to support the three-dimensional learning of their students, they need high-quality professional learning (PL). This presentation outlines a PL approach that focuses on Ambitious Science Teaching (Windschitl, M. Thompson, J., & Braaten, M., 2018) as an approach to support teacher and student three-dimensional science learning. The PL model includes 4 PL sessions followed by 3 action periods to “try-on” strategies in their classrooms. During the PL sessions teachers experienced ambitious strategies as learners, connected theory to practice, collaborated meaningfully with colleagues, and reflected on their implementation of strategies. The sessions led to a change in teacher practice that was evident through the artifacts they collected. Teachers also made cross-curricular connections with many of the introduced strategies. This presentation provides suggestions for supporting teachers in implementing ambitious science teaching strategies.

TAKEAWAYS:
The audience will walk away with a model for high-quality professional learning for teachers that supports student growth in three-dimensional science learning. The model can be implemented at the school, district, or cross-district level.

SPEAKERS:
Heather Milo (Washington University in St. Louis: St. Louis, MO), Alex Gerber (Instructional Specialist: University City, MO)

Using Neuroscience Research in the STEM Classroom

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2214



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Brain based hacks to learning.pptx

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

As teachers, it is important for us to understand how the brain works when students are learning. Brain science research has not been easy to transfer to the classroom setting. We are beginning to bridge the gap with real-world, classroom research. By joining this session, you will uncover some of the newest neuroscience/learning research and ways to use the information in your classroom. Retrieval practice, interleaving, spaced practice, and elaborate encoding are a few of the topics we will learn about. In addition, you will leave with plenty of short 5-minute tools you can use right away in your classroom, as well as a deeper understanding of the pros and cons of neuroscience research and classroom settings.

TAKEAWAYS:
Not all research is equal, especially when it comes to classroom teaching. This session will help you understand the research, it's strengths and limitations, and provide you with usable tools to start using right away.

SPEAKERS:
Kirsten Landry (Kent Denver School: Englewood, CO)

Intentional Art Integration

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2208


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

The presenters will share the development of an elementary science lesson that incorporates art into science as a meaningful tool, not a fun supplemental activity. Participants will then complete the example activity that involves developing a solution to a real-world problem using a combination of science and art knowledge and skills. At the conclusion of the example activity, the presenters will provide information on the development of the activity and participants will have the opportunity to begin developing their own science and art-infused lessons.

TAKEAWAYS:
Art does not have to only be a supplemental activity that is added after a science lesson, it can be an integral part of a STEAM lesson.

SPEAKERS:
Amber Mintert (Associate Professor of Art: Joplin, MO), Laura Schisler (Missouri Southern State University: Joplin, MO)

Inspiring Curiosity with Wildlife Cams

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2209


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Live-streaming wildlife cams give students an intimate view into the amazing and diverse world of animals and allow teachers to engage all students in inquiry- and phenomena-based learning as nature unfolds in real-time and with unknown outcomes. Wildlife cams encourage questioning and curiosity, build connections to wildlife and nature, and are interesting to teachers and students alike. Cams engage students who have fewer opportunities to be immersed in nature, including those in urban settings, with mobility challenges, and in remote learning environments. I will guide teachers through a series of questions to help them determine good live-streaming cams to use in their classrooms. I’ll discuss different ways to use cameras within the classroom, including active and passive usage. I’ll share how we use cams to make observations and they will draw their own comics as we watch a live-streaming cam.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will discover a variety of wildlife cams from around the world, explore how they can be used to effectively develop student science practices, and discover free resources to support science learning through wildlife cams.

SPEAKERS:
Susan Licher (Cornell Lab of Ornithology: Ithaca, NY)

Everything You Always Wanted to Know about NGSS, But Were Afraid to Ask

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Everything You Always Wanted to Know About NGSS Handout
https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/e/2PACX-1vRtiYhuGkgiE9mz0cHDUsaaOKFBGLXHwRki7XdQfu5HMhr110VQIVYqpaWlGRGhlsBM7UmSfIAwa34O/pub?start=false&loop=false&delayms=60000
Kansas City 2023_Everything You Wanted to Know about NGSS Presentation

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

The NGSS is very complicated. The Institute for Quality Science Teaching at the Museum of Science and Industry provides professional learning opportunities for science teachers in Chicagoland and surrounding areas. Our approach is to ground everything we do in the NGSS and take a deep dive into all the elements of 3-dimensional learning. The professional learning programs at MSI are invested in helping teachers understand how to teach science effectively using these standards. This presentation will review the basics of the NGSS, the 3 dimensions, how they’re combined in Performance Expectations, and the basics of how to enact the NGSS in the classroom. If you need a refresher, just want a review, or still don’t have all those acronyms straight in your head, this is the presentation for you.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will leave with a basic understanding of the structures of the Next Generation Science Standards and how they inform three-dimensional standards and three-dimensional science teaching.

SPEAKERS:
Garrett Gray (Sr. Educator, School and Teacher Programs: Chicago, IL), Tara Flett (Sr. Educator IQST: Chicago, IL)

Authentic Literacy and Language (ALL) for Science: Reading, Writing, and Thinking Like a Scientist!

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2202


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Participants will explore the Authentic Literacy and Language (ALL) for Science curriculum framework and discover how the combination of guided science investigations, mini-lessons on science-based disciplinary literacy, and science inquiry circles can increase learner performance. They will receive and be guided through a sample lesson and a template they can use to develop their own lessons using this framework. Teachers who used lessons using this curriculum framework reported that children demonstrated increased engagement with lessons and improved their language skills as they began to read, write, and think like scientists. They also found that children performed better overall on assessments of science concepts, attributing the use of collaborative learning teams that build a community of science practice as a factor. Participants will receive access to the ALL for Science website where they can download FREE curriculum resources aligned with NGSS standards.

TAKEAWAYS:
Educators will explore how they can create their own lessons unifying science investigations with science-specific disciplinary literacy using the ALLS framework to engage learners in the practices of science. Participants will receive the framework template and access to free resources.

SPEAKERS:
Jimmie Thomas (Baylor College of Medicine)

Engaging Students Through Sensemaking Discussions in Middle School Science

Friday, October 27 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2207



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1t4mU686fREgY9yRUF7S6btUWrHb6tjt-XNLg6URENYc/edit?usp=sharing

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Research shows that when students are typically engaged in science class discussions, the teacher asks a question, one student responds, the teacher gives feedback, and the cycle continues. The teacher then only knows about the understanding of science of one student. But what are the other students able to make sense of? This presentation will share with attendees research that was conducted through a dissertation, explicitly looking at talk moves developed by Sarah Michaels and Cathy O'Connor, and how they increased engagement with female students. This presentation will also provide teachers with these talk moves, and tips and tricks on how they can be used in a middle school science classroom, and how they better help students make sense of science phenomena.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will takeaway with tips and tricks that will get middle school students engaging in sensemaking discussions. Teachers will be provided with a set of talk moves that can be implemented Monday with students!

SPEAKERS:
Betsy Lawrence (Summit Trail Middle School: Olathe, KS)

The OpenSciEd High School Assessment System

Friday, October 27 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 H



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1RvXrahTHcXNStYNsw9xd8hPJda-eN6kD-jx_gX8_XLY/edit#slide=id.g2c531e4dad7_0_266

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Explore the comprehensive assessment system that accompanies the OpenSciEd high school program. This comprehensive system includes opportunities for formative, summative, self, and peer assessment. The session will guide participants through the multiple assessment types and will explore in depth electronic exit tickets and transfer tasks. Electronic exit tickets give teachers an opportunity to formatively assess students' three dimensional thinking at key points in each unit. Transfer tasks are summative assessment opportunities that give students an opportunity to transfer what they have learned in the unit to a novel scenario. Both of these assessment opportunities include teacher and student routines to support student thinking and instructional action.

TAKEAWAYS:
In OpenSciEd HS, the assessment system is structured to support teachers in assessing all three dimensions of the NGSS through formative, summative, peer, and self assessment opportunities.

SPEAKERS:
Zoe Buck Bracey (Senior Science Educator and Director of Design for Justice: Colorado Springs, CO), Michael Novak (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Kate Henson (University of Colorado Boulder: Boulder, CO)

Stop Reinventing the Wheel: Utilizing OER Performance Tasks to Make Student Learning Visible

Friday, October 27 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2209


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Too often teachers spend valuable time creating performance tasks in science to encourage sensemaking in their students and to make student thinking more visible. This session will highlight available OER resources that have been compiled across multiple sites. Using these tasks as a starting point, participants will explore ways to adapt these tasks to meet the needs of their classroom. Participants will learn strategies for increasing rigor, providing different levels of support, and providing opportunities to increase student engagement through student voice and choice.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants in this session will leave with an understanding of the OER tasks available for classroom use and strategies to adapt these tasks for their classroom. Strategies will include examples of support for scaffolding, giving meaningful feedback, and increasing student voice and choice.

SPEAKERS:
Kelley Aitken (Winchester Public Schools: Winchester, VA)

Authentic Learning Opportunities in the Science Classroom

Friday, October 27 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2204


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Authentic learning (AL) in the classroom is not new, however it is underutilized in the science classroom. We will present current research on the topic of authentic science learning and its efficacy in developing scientific literacy. Through this presentation we will inspire teachers to provide more real-world scientific experiences and interactions with real scientists to their students. We will also provide educators with ready-to-use materials to use in the classroom. The presentation will include the definition of authentic learning and what types of teaching strategies qualify as 'authentic' with a focus on project-based, inquiry-based, and problem-based teaching methods. Also included in the presentation are the interwoven connections between authentic learning opportunities, socio-scientific issues and citizen science, and the natural connection between AL and NGSS Science and Engineering Practices.

TAKEAWAYS:
Educators will walk away with an understanding of Authentic Learning and what authentic learning opportunities look like in the science classroom. Attendees will have access to pre-made activities to use immediately with minimal preparation.

SPEAKERS:
Kristen Benton (Kenesaw Public Schools: Kenesaw, NE), Bailey Johnson (Hastings Public Schools: Hastings, NE)

Alternative Approaches to (Pre)Assessment

Friday, October 27 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2206


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

In this session, participants will consider three alternatives to traditional multiple-choice pre-assessments: modeling, self-documentation, and class discussions. We will discuss the purpose of pre-assessments as a critical data point for instructional planning, especially with many schools moving towards PLC structures around data cycles. We will see examples of these three alternative strategies for pre-assessment (which can also be used as formative assessment structures). For each assessment structure, we will discuss how to collect and use data. Authentic examples will be provided from the presenter’s middle school and high school classrooms.The session will synthesize and apply ideas from the following ACESSE Stem Teaching Tools: Modeling #8 / self-documentation #31 / class discussions #6, #35 / using pre-assessments #15, #18, #25, #34, #37. These STEM teaching tools will be shared with participants to continue their learning beyond the 60-minute session.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how to use different assessment formats to collect data without relying on multiple-choice questions. The assessment formats allow students to use knowledge & experiences of a phenomenon or science idea while providing meaningful information to guide instructional choices.

SPEAKERS:
Stephanie Alderman-Oler (Washington High School: Kansas City, KS)

What is it like to teach with OpenSciEd High School? A teachers' panel discussion

Friday, October 27 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 H



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
What is it like to teach with OpenSciEd High School A teachers' panel discussion-1.pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Building classroom culture is essential for students to collectively make sense of phenomena. Students need to buy into the idea that each of their ideas is crucial for pushing the class forward. In this session, we highlight strategies for co-creating community agreements. We also report on challenges we have encountered in our classrooms, which strategies we have found to be successful, and which tend to turn students off. We highlight how, as culture challenges arise throughout the year, we can return to these community agreements to reground our classroom. The facilitator will begin the session with a brief overview of OpenSciEd’s view of the teacher's role in instruction and community-building, which will then be followed with a guided panel featuring experienced teachers in using storylines, and finally open Q&A.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will understand how community agreements and other strategies are used in OpenSciEd and other high school classrooms to support collective and equitable sensemaking.

SPEAKERS:
Dan Voss (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Kerri Wingert (Good Question Research: Boulder, CO), Rachel Patton (Denver Public Schools), Nina Blanton (Educator: , MO), Calvin Atkins (Bellingham High School: Bellingham, WA), Sarah Evans (Olathe South High School: Olathe, KS)

Ready, Set, Launch Students into Engineering Design!

Friday, October 27 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2102 A


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Participants learn hands-on how to engage students in a STEM design challenge. They discover the importance of research through experimentation while investigating 4 variables that affect a straw rocket’s flight. They’ll create a series of straw rockets, testing each variable through launching. Participants will learn strategies to teach students measurement and data collection skills with any experimental design process for any level; whether that is beginning measurement in Pre-K and K to the importance of significant figures in measurement with high school. Teachers will experience strategies for classroom data analysis and use this in their ultimate challenge: designing and engineering the ideal straw rocket to test in a distance competition. Teachers will learn strategies to differentiate this concept in any K-12 classroom and see testimonials on this from the Air Camp Programming and Teacher Air Camp alumni.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn hands-on strategies to help students develop measurement, data collection, and analysis skills they can apply in engineering design lessons. You will learn methods to differentiate this in any K-12 setting and leave with free resources for your classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Jennifer Stormer (3-6 STEM Teacher/ Elementary and Teacher Curriculum Specialist, Air Camp USA: Union, OH), Christina Davis (Air Camp USA, Inc.: Dayton, OH)

Student Detectives: Learning Across the Curriculum

Friday, October 27 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2102 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Learning Across the Curriculum bookteacher guide list

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

As a nonfiction author, I always start where my readers are—hooking them in by grounding them in what they already know, then expanding on that knowledge. Teaching is no different, and incorporating nonfiction books into the curriculum can allow teachers to address standards across different disciplines while building their students’ understanding of a topic. This session will look at two books that can do this, one on that addresses interdependent relationships in ecosystems and one that examines natural hazards and the history of the planet. How do scientists use evidence to support their arguments, and how can we model those steps when teaching students how to develop their arguments in writing? Scientific research isn’t all that different from text-dependent analysis, and this presentation will discuss how to address both using true, jaw-dropping examples straight from our own backyards.

TAKEAWAYS:
We can use nonfiction books to ground learning, making information more accessible as students encounter information in a variety of ways across the curriculum.

SPEAKERS:
Alison Pearce Stevens (nonfiction author)

Working Smarter not Harder - Grading that's Good for Students and Teachers

Friday, October 27 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 H


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

As educators shift their teaching practice to align with the Framework for K-12 Science and the NGSS, they face various challenges and barriers. One pressing challenge is how to align their new approach to teaching and learning with existing assessment and grading systems. In this session, we will provide examples of 3D assessments and associated scoring guidance. Participants will review student work for these sample assessments and identify evidence of understanding. They will collaborate with others in the session and determine how they would give grades based on set criteria. The second part of the session will highlight different approaches to grading based on local grading expectations (e.g., standards-based grading, daily grade requirements, or 100 point-based systems). Participants will leave the session with approaches to assessment and grading that support student sensemaking and honor the diverse resources students bring to the classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
The process of giving feedback and assigning grades is easier when there are strong materials and assessments to build from, and technology can help make it faster without decreasing effectiveness for students.

SPEAKERS:
Matt Krehbiel (OpenSciEd: New York, NY)

The NSTA Atlas of the Three Dimensions

Friday, October 27 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 C


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The NSTA Atlas of the Three Dimensions maps out learning progressions based on the Framework for K–12 Science Education and the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). The 62 maps in the Atlas organize all of the elements from standards on a particular topic (e.g., modeling, patterns, or definitions of energy) on a single page. The elements from grades K–2 are at the bottom of the page, and those from grades 9–12 are at the top. Arrows connect elements to indicate how ideas in a particular topic build on each other and how elements in different topics connect to one another. Studying the maps in the Atlas and the additional resources in the appendixes can provide educators with new insights about the standards. This session will provide an overview of how to read a map, the other features of the Atlas, and how educators can use this powerful navigational tool to develop and implement curriculum, instruction, and assessment.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how to read the maps and use other tools in the Atlas to understand and interpret standards, and plan instructional sequences as part of their work in curriculum, instruction, and assessment.

SPEAKERS:
Ted Willard (Discovery Education: Silver Spring, MD)

KATS: Kansas Association of Teachers of Science supports YOU!

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2211


STRAND: Leadership and Advocacy

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The Kansas Association of Teachers of Science (KATS) is the District 11 chapter of the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA). The purpose of the KATS shall be the advancement, stimulation, extension, improvement, and coordination of science teaching in all fields of science at all educational levels. This session will explain the purpose of KATS to science teachers in Kansas, explain leadership opportunities that KATS provides its members, and share the amazing professional development opportunities and network events that will bridge Kansas science teachers together. Teachers will be introduced to members of the board of directors of KATS who desire to create a support system to science teachers.

TAKEAWAYS:
Kansas teachers will learn about the Kansas Association of Teachers of Science, the professional development opportunities they provide, and the system of networking they create to bridge science teachers together in the state of Kansas.

SPEAKERS:
Betsy Lawrence (Summit Trail Middle School: Olathe, KS)

Be An #A11y Ally: Creating an Accessible STEM Classroom

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2204



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
https://www.katiefielding.com/nsta23

STRAND: Tech Tools

Show Details

Outline: (5 Minutes): Initial engagement KWL chart activity about creating accessible spaces: both physical and digital (15 minutes). Presentation about the importance of digital accessibility and some essential things to know (15 minutes). Educators will engage in discussion groups to brainstorm ways to bring accessibility culture to their STEM classroom using the HOW MIGHT WE design thinking protocol (5 Minutes). Closure: educators will go back to the KWL chart and fill in the L, what they learned during the session. Katie Fielding is a STEM Coach in Price William County Schools, Virginia. She is passionate about accessibility and creativity in the classroom. https://www.katiefielding.com/

TAKEAWAYS:
Removes barriers in your STEM classroom for all learners with an understanding of digital accessibility and universal design for learning.

SPEAKERS:
Katherine Fielding (Prince William County Schools)

Toward Equitable Science Teaching and Learning: Language Shifts in the NGSS Classroom

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2102 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Handout (Language Shifts)
Session Slides (Language Shifts).pptx.pdf

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

A collaborative team of teachers and researchers share findings from a research project aimed at integrating science and language with fifth-grade multilingual learners (MLs). First, we describe three language instructional shifts: modalities, registers, and interactions. Then, we share how two teachers enacted these shifts over the course of a physical science unit and present classroom examples of how they (a) used nonlinguistic modalities (e.g., models) as an essential way to engage all students in the Science and Engineering Practices, (b) treated specialized language (i.e., a more formal register) as a product of learning science rather than a prerequisite, and (c) leveraged the affordances of different registers (i.e., everyday, specialized) based on the different communicative demands across different types of interactions. Finally, we provide suggestions for enacting these language instructional shifts with MLs across a range of classroom contexts.

TAKEAWAYS:
As all students, and especially multilingual learners, make sense of phenomena and problems, they use multiple modalities (both linguistic and visual) and a range of registers (from everyday to specialized) across different types of interactions to engage in communication of science ideas.

SPEAKERS:
Iovanna Williams (Science Teacher: , NY), Adriana Romanzo (Elementary Science Teacher: New York, NY), Abigail Schwenger (Research Associate)

An Introduction to the 5E Instructional Model Incorporating Three-Dimensional Learning

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2206



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
An Introduction to the 5E Instructional Model Incorporating Three-Dimensional Learning.pptx

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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Roger Bybee's Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS) 5E Instructional Model is based on constructivist theories and enhances student inquiry through a series of planning strategies. This model is designed to incorporate all aspects of inquiry learning environments by engaging students and allowing students to explore the concepts being introduced, discover explanations for the concepts they are learning, and elaborate on what they have learned by applying their knowledge to new situations. Through the engage, explore, and explain stages of the model, knowledge about science is gained. In the elaborate stage, a problem is introduced and engineering and mathematics are used to help solve the problem. In this session participants will be introduced to the model through a states of matter lesson that can be adapted to the intermediate, middle, and high school levels. Three-Dimensional Learning will be highlighted and participants will have access to a 5E Model planning template.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will gain an understanding of the 5E instructional model and how the stages incorporate Three-Dimensional Learning -- the framework of the Next Generation Science Standards.

SPEAKERS:
Christina Hilton (Central Indiana Educational Service Center: Indianapolis, IN)

University and College Instructors: Use NSTA with Preservice Teachers

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 G



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA_Instructors_2023_KC_final.pdf

STRAND: Research to Practice

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Preservice teachers using NSTA in lieu of a textbook create a library of resources, grow their network of professional colleagues, and enhance their content and pedagogical knowledge of science by actively engaging with NSTA digital resources, virtual programs, and community members within the NSTA website. Instructors receive a class landing page to manage their course and to easily access the digital resources, a private forum for asynchronous discussions, and an administrator's dashboard to monitor their students' engagement within the website. All instructors using NSTA in lieu of a textbook receive a free NSTA membership, and their students can become members of the Association through graduation. Students gain the ability to add NSTA’s Interactive E-Books+ Professional, professional learning units, and other fee-based resources to their library.

TAKEAWAYS:
Preservice teachers using NSTA as a Textbook (or as instructional materials supplement) create a library of resources, grow their network of professional colleagues, and enhance their content and pedagogical knowledge of science.

SPEAKERS:
Flavio Mendez (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Using Cognitive Load Theory in the Classroom

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2205



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Sweller’s Cognitive Load Theory in the Classroom (1).pdf

STRAND: Research to Practice

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John Sweller's Cognitive Load Theory in 1988 should have changed education, and yet, it is rarely talked about today. Knowing how students' brains become overloaded with information, leading to disruption and behavioral issues, can only enhance the time you have with your students. Learn about Germane, Intrinsic, and Extrinsic load, as well as how to use that knowledge to create lessons, assessments, and activities that target the learning you want the students to achieve. With specific, easy to use, and direct tips, this session will help teachers reduce unnecessary cognitive load and increase learning.

TAKEAWAYS:
Students come to your class as different learners. One thing they have in common is Cognitive Load! Find ways to teach more efficiently, reduce unnecessary cognitive load, and increase student retention by learning about Sweller's Cognitive Load Theory.

SPEAKERS:
Kirsten Landry (Kent Denver School: Englewood, CO)

Unpacking the Crosscutting Concepts with a New NSTA Quick-Reference Guide to the Three Dimensions

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 C


STRAND: Leadership and Advocacy

Show Details

The NGSS and other standards based on the Framework of K-12 Education are quite complicated and often tricky to interpret. What teachers need is an easy-to-use reference guide to the standards, and since its release in 2014, the NSTA Quick-Reference Guide has become a perennial best-seller and an essential tool for many educators across the country. This session will be hosted by Ted Willard, the editor of the Quick-Reference Guide and formerly the in-house standards expert at NSTA. Ted will review the features listed above and how educators can use the Quick-Reference Guide to unpack the standards in their work developing curriculum, instruction, and assessment. Specifically, we will spend time exploring the crosscutting concepts in the standards using the tools and other resources in the Quick-Reference Guide.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how to unpack the three dimensions using the tools and resources in the Quick-Reference Guide and will gain insights into the meaning of the crosscutting concepts.

SPEAKERS:
Ted Willard (Discovery Education: Silver Spring, MD)

Planning for Effective Three-Dimensional Learning

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2208


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Helping students make sense of science means planning for high-quality science experiences that engage students in all three dimensions of the NGSS. This session focuses on exploring the ASET 3-D Mapping Tool as a mechanism for planning lesson sequences and units that integrate the Science and Engineering Practices, Disciplinary Core Ideas, and Crosscutting Concepts as outlined in the Framework (NRC, 2012). The presenter will lead the participants in analyzing an existing 6-8 curriculum with respect to the related standards, phenomena, learning objectives, science practices, crosscutting concepts, and disciplinary core ideas. The session is concluded by sharing the lessons learned from researchers and practitioners who have used the 3-D map in planning and revising NGSS-aligned science learning experiences. After working in small groups and engaging in whole-group discussions, participants will walk away with an NGSS planning tool and tangible unit and lesson plan ideas linked with NGSS.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will explore the ASET 3-D Mapping Tool for planning lessons and units that integrate the three dimensions of the NGSS. After working in small groups and engaging in whole-group discussions, they will leave with an NGSS planning tool and tangible unit and lesson ideas linked with NGSS.

SPEAKERS:
Stephanie Harmon (PIMSER (KY): No City, No State)

The Benefits of Immersive, Place-Based Professional Learning for Teachers

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 E


STRAND: Leadership and Advocacy

Show Details

The NGSS provides a powerful set of performance expectations to guide improvements in science education. Translating these performance expectations into practices requires support and professional learning opportunities for teachers. Even after a decade, the conceptual shifts and three-dimensional learning laid forth in A Framework, and defined in the NGSS, continues to be a challenge. As we shift students’ learning experiences from "learning about" to "figuring out" so too should we offer professional learning experiences to educators that allow them to experience the three-dimensional elements of science authentically. Immersive or place-based professional learning for teachers builds understanding, empathy, and connection to the three dimensions of NGSS. Learn how to connect educators and enhance their understanding of disciplinary core ideas through immersive experiences.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn about the benefits of immersive and place-based learning and how it can bring the sensemaking process to life. We will provide phenomena and examples which fully engage the three dimensions of the NGSS approach, and are in use in daily practice by researchers and scientists.

SPEAKERS:
Rick Henningfeld (Vivayic, Inc.: No City, No State), Brian Beierle (Vivayic, Inc.: No City, No State)

Sensemaking with Phenomenon Questioning Technique

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2102 A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Sensemaking with the Phenomenon Questioning Technique.pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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In this session, participants will experience and unpack the Phenomenon Questioning Technique and will be able to apply it in their classroom. Students observe a phenomenon and are given time to observe and wonder. In groups, students: - Ask as many questions as they can. - Don’t stop to discuss, judge, or answer questions. - Change any statements into questions. - Circle their best question. Remind students to think about what makes a good question as they make their choice (related to science, helps explain phenomena, able to be investigated or researched, etc.). - Share their questions on a “Student-Driven Question Board.” - ​​Using the commonalities, create one guiding question for the class. - Students reflect on how they did with questioning by way of the formative assessment.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will experience and unpack the Phenomenon Questioning Technique and will be able to apply it in their classrooms.

SPEAKERS:
Eric Hadley (Little Creek Nature Area: Florissant, MO), Rebecca Prokopf (Regional Curriculum Coordinator)

Research to Practice: Professional Development that Works for all NGSS Classrooms

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2208



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
KC2023_Research to Practice: Professional Development that Works for all NGSS
Research to Practice Professional Development that Works for all NGSS Handout

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

The Institute for Quality Science Teaching at the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago is invested in helping teachers effectively implement the NGSS. Chicago area teachers use a variety of curricula, so we are developing a framework of high-leverage pedagogical practices that can be used with any NGSS-aligned curriculum to enhance science teaching and learning. The framework was designed with a focus on equity. All the pedagogies are backed by research demonstrating their effectiveness. Our goal is to move research into classroom practices that are accessible to all science teachers. We’ll review pedagogical focuses, particular pedagogical practices, and classroom strategies that can be most helpful in implementing the NGSS in classrooms. We’re developing a “how-to” guide for teaching with the NGSS, no matter which curriculum you’re using. We’re very excited to have a chance to share our thinking with teachers and to hear their thoughts and suggestions about our approach.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will gain a deeper understanding of high-leverage pedagogical practices that directly support teaching with the NGSS, and strategies to implement some of these practices in the science classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Garrett Gray (Sr. Educator, School and Teacher Programs: Chicago, IL), Tara Flett (Sr. Educator IQST: Chicago, IL)

Embracing Empathy: Applying Human-Centered Design Principles to Support the Implementation of NGSS

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 B


STRAND: Leadership and Advocacy

Show Details

Learn to design moments people will remember and experiences that can have immediate impacts by adopting a human-centered mindset. Human-centered design thinking lets you better understand people's needs, motivations, and concerns to create highly-effective learning experiences for teachers and students. Implementing NGSS and three-dimensional teaching and learning requires ongoing support and high-quality professional learning opportunities for all stakeholders in science education. This session will explore how strategies and methods found in human-centered design can be leveraged to create professional learning to address the complexities teachers face in shifting practices to meet the vision of A K-12 Framework and the three-dimensional pedagogy of the NGSS. These strategies will enable designers to create inclusive spaces and environments to enhance professional development. Likewise, these strategies can be used by teachers to facilitate the student sensemaking process.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will experience practical human-centered design processes, methods, and tools used to deeply understand the people they are looking to serve and to continuously innovate solutions. Participants will leave this session equipped with strategies to design impactful learning experiences.

SPEAKERS:
Abby Tolley (Learning Analyst), Brian Beierle (Vivayic, Inc.: No City, No State)

Holding the Line: Ensuring Science and Social Science Standards are Met in an ELA-Centric Elementary World

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2205


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Our goal is to demonstrate how one large urban district combined the standards from science, social science and ELA to make sure these standards are taught, even in a curriculum that is ELA-centric. The vast majority of the time in the day doesn't attempt to cover science or social science standards. We've woven our standards alongside the ELA standards and topics so that we are certain there is time for science and social science. This is important because as one sales rep has said, "I know it looks like science, but don't worry, its really reading." We don't want a student's science or social science experience to be relegated to just a 'Science Friday' situation.

TAKEAWAYS:
Students need to figure out science and social science, not just learn about them. To think like scientists and social scientists, students have to DO the work of scientists and social scientists.

SPEAKERS:
Cory Nilsen (Rockford Public Schools: Rockford, IL), Joshua Rappuhn (Rockford Public Schools: Rockford, IL)

Do You Hate Writing Learning Targets? So DID We, Until We Made Them Work for Science

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2206



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Do You Hate Writing Learning Targets? NSTA KC 2023.pdf
PDF of presentation

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

School leaders frequently require teachers to share learning targets and success criteria to provide tangible goals for students. However, science sensemaking requires that students figure out, not learn about, science ideas by making sense of phenomena. Learning targets can undermine this sensemaking if they're written, as is often expected, in ways that give away the content. Our collaborative group of teachers developed a way to write learning targets to meet leadership expectations, support the intentions of learning targets, AND preserve the three-dimensional sensemaking at the core of A Framework for K-12 Science Education. This participatory presentation will share our tools and approach to integrating SEPs and CCCs into learning targets, as well as reflections on how this work supports deeper phenomenon sensemaking and standard alignment. Attendees will consider and discuss these tools and reflections, including application to their own classroom contexts.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will explore how dimension-aligned sentence stems help to make science learning targets and success criteria more 3-D and supportive of sensemaking. They will consider how the resulting targets and criteria support administration goals while improving teacher planning and practice.

SPEAKERS:
Richard Carroll (Teacher: Green River, WY), Matt Freze (Science Teacher: Green River, WY), Shawna Mattson (Green River High School: Green River, WY), Megan Allen (Teacher: Green River, WY), Katie Camis (SPED Teacher / support science: Green River, WY), Clare Gunshenan (University of Wyoming: Laramie, WY)

Basil Bedlam!: Integrating Hydroponics Into the Science Classroom Using Challenge-Based Learning

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2203



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Basil Bedlam! PowerPoint.pdf
Basil bedlam, teacher guide and student materials.pdf

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Using Jamboard, the attendees reflect upon, and then share with a shoulder partner, their prior knowledge with hydroponics. Next, we define hydroponics, provide a brief history of the method, and discuss its relevance in industry and economics. Following, we detail our challenge-based learning experience. In it, we asked students to grow basil cheaper than store-based brands and presented the lesson’s constraints and criteria to them. Students, then, iteratively engaged in basil/hydroponics research, brainstormed variables to test, planted and maintained their basil, collected and interpreted data, and conceptualized their findings. As an outcome, students organized posters, which identified and argued the conditions to complete the challenge. We also reflect about how the experience elevated students’ engineering practices and other NGSS outcomes. To conclude the session, attendees will brainstorm strategies to integrate hydroponics into their classroom. All resources will be shared.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will examine a challenge-based learning experience using hydroponics and conceptualize hydroponics as a classroom activity to help students apply engineering practices.

SPEAKERS:
Andrew Kipp (Texas A&M)

STEAM-ing Every Lesson, NGSS Style

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2208


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

If NGSS lessons address all aspects of STEAM in every lesson, students will actively engage & be excited every day. Post lockdown, classroom challenges include apathy and pushback, but if students have an expectation of coming to a classroom where they will be advancing, engaged, and busy, and let’s say it-- having fun (!), students achieve at high levels. In this presentation, five mini-unit lesson plans are presented with all 5 STEAM facets incorporated into each. The five lessons cover different MS DCI’s, with their SEP & CCC’s. Example: MS-PS1-3 & MS-ESS3-3. Lesson starts with mini-Math (M) review/game on density mathematics, Jeopardy style. Followed by a short experiment/exploration/play time with floating objects in water (S), (they separate by density, floating or sinking). Then small group online explorations (T), of kinds of plastics & objects contained in Great Ocean Garbage Patch (GOGP), how they got there, etc. Then do posters or presentations using art, (A) on findings.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will take home 5 examples of lessons which utilize a basic STEAM lesson plan template, which will make NGSS Science lessons fun and fast-moving, while incorporating every aspect of Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Mathematics (STEAM). These are all Monday-doable!

SPEAKERS:
Julie A. Smith (Lennox Middle School: Lennox, CA)

Lab Safety with Superheroes!

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2207


STRAND: Leadership and Advocacy

Show Details

News reports of accidents and hazards reinforce the need for ongoing leadership and advocacy for safe science classrooms (Gerlovich et al., 2007; West et al., 2003). In this session, participants will review free resources on school science safety (NGSS, 2013; NSTA, 2015). To enhance training and learning about safety, participants will also examine multiple superhero examples to use as case studies. Superheroes have been a mainstay in popular culture for decades. Science teachers can harness this widespread interest to elevate instruction and advocacy for science safety. Example illustrations include reporting accidents (Spider-Man, Hulk/She-Hulk), never working alone (Flash), keeping a tidy workspace (Moon Girl), handling living organisms (Ant-Man), and more. In addition to specific case studies, teachers will practice analyzing popular culture and research for wider engagement. They will also review important copyright parameters and “fair use” in classroom instruction.

TAKEAWAYS:
In this interactive session, participants will explore multiple superhero case studies as tools for enhanced science safety training and advocacy, applying materials and policies from NSTA and other sources. Attendees will also examine copyright “fair use” with multimedia resources in the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Daniel Bergman (Wichita State University: Wichita, KS)

Now You’re Talking! Leveraging Conversations to Drive Student Understanding

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2211


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Students collaboratively figuring out phenomena or solutions is key to the NGSS. Teachers need tools to facilitate these discussions into academically rich experiences that support ALL students. Science investigations offer opportunities for engagement for all, but need to be guided expertly. Student engagement is critical for academic success, especially for our English Learners, Special Education, and Foster Youth. Science investigations offer a way to engage students at any level and keep them excited about learning. While working through phenomena, students need to crystalize their own thinking, then share these thoughts with others in order to fully develop them. To do so, certain academic language and terms must be used. Through the shared activity of investigating phenomena, students work through science concepts and use the needed science vocabulary. Teachers guide the discussions through scaffolded questions that facilitate student communication by clarifying their t

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn to lead students to conceptual understandings by using discussion tools, academic language, and discussion routines that promote equity and engagement.

SPEAKERS:
Heather McDonald (Riverside Unified School District: Riverside, CA), Julia Smith (Riverside Unified School District: Riverside, CA), Shannon Dadlez (Riverside Unified School District: Riverside, CA)

Implementing Differentiation Strategies in High School Classrooms

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Truman B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Implementing Differentiation Slides

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Differentiation in the science classroom is essential for student learning, allowing students to enter the lesson from different points and gain the tools to access material and ensure enduring understanding. In this session, participants will learn about a variety of strategies they can use in their classroom to engage students, identify misconceptions, provide varied practice activities, and offer choices in the learning progression. Differentiation seems to be a wide umbrella, but this session aims to narrow the focus and provide teachers with tools and tips they can implement as soon as they’re home from NSTA!

TAKEAWAYS:
Takeaway a deeper understanding of approaches to differentiation, including both small- and large-scale strategies that are applicable to all science classrooms. Strategies range from simple techniques that can be implemented during a portion of one class, to unit-long approaches.

SPEAKERS:
Kellie Dean (Adlai E. Stevenson High School: Lincolnshire, IL), Jin Kyung Hwang (Adlai E. Stevenson High School: Lincolnshire, IL), Molly Sponseller (Adlai E. Stevenson High School: Lincolnshire, IL)

Compacting Curriculum in Junior High Science

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2204


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Curriculum compacting replaces content that students already know with new content, enrichment options, or other activities. It can be effective for: students who have already mastered the material and those students that may learn material quickly. Research shows that students who received compacted curriculum scored significantly higher on achievement posttests than their peers who received "all of the work" with no compacting. On my team, we compacted curriculum for several units last year and our mastery scores drastically improved on STAAR from prior years. Compacted curriculum allowed our GT (and advanced) learners to have an opportunity for enrichment rather than learning things they already knew. Participants will be receiving resources and examples of curriculum compacting in science. They are encouraged to ask questions throughout. During the session, attendees can look at their own curriculum to determine where in their science units (and when) they could try compacting.

TAKEAWAYS:
1) Attendees will learn WHAT Curriculum Compacting is and WHY it is so important in the science classroom. 2) Attendees will be shown HOW to begin compacting in their classrooms. 3) Attendees will walk away with resources to help them begin compacting, and will be given opportunities to ask questions.

SPEAKERS:
Sandra Rodriguez (Katy ISD: Katy, TX)

Translating Experience to Classroom Practice through Research Experiences for STEM Educators & Teachers (RESET)

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 F


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

This presentation will include a description of the participants accepted by AEOP RESET, a breakdown of the components of the program, and an overview of the past cohorts of the program. The session will be divided into the following time sections: AEOP overview (10 minutes); RESET overview (10 minutes); examples from previous cohorts (10 minutes); information about how to join and obligations (10 minutes); and questions from the audience (remaining time). Research in the STEM content areas is vital to the success of our nation. In AEOP RESET, educators have an opportunity to participate in real-world research at Army research centers or with universities conducting research funded by the DoD. They then work collaboratively with other educators around the nation to create standards-aligned STEM unit plans. This program seeks to help educators answer the “when will I ever use this” questions that students are asking!

TAKEAWAYS:
The audience will leave with information about AEOP programs, specifically RESET. Attendees will receive information about how to become involved with the AEOP RESET program.

SPEAKERS:
Kelly Moore (Tennessee Tech: Cookeville, TN)

Career Info + Career Experience + Research Project + Mentor = 89% Choosing STEM Careers

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2105


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

STEM Career awareness has been done in many ways, as has STEM experiences. Students doing research projects is not new, nor is having mentors. What IS novel is how a coordinated effort to move students from career awareness to interest, to proficiency, through doing research in a mentored and well-resourced environment with extensive Teacher PD at the core, really results in 89% of the students choosing a STEM career. Based on a 12-year case study, the combination of intentional (teacher/student) support centered around a specific STEM career has outcomes tracked in a free online database. This presentation will share the formula, coach teachers to create their own implementation plan during the session, and offer web access to the free online database so teachers/students can track their own progress and benchmark it to aggregated anonymous data of others doing similar programs. Teachers are able to pull/share a PDF report of their own outcomes and as compared to others.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will leave with a written plan for their chosen career focus and lists of resource suggestions to help implement this program locally, as well as access to an online data tracking system where they can benchmark outcomes and receive tabulated reports at no charge.

SPEAKERS:
Jill Ott (Science Coach: Saint Louis, MO)

Transforming Traditional Laboratories Into Challenge-Based Learning Experiences

Saturday, October 28 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2104 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Transforming traditional laboratories into challenge-based learning experiences.pdf

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

The session exhibits challenged-based learning and organizes traditional classroom laboratories (i.e., investigate phenomena, teacher-led procedure, collect and analyze data, conclusion) into challenge-based learning experiences (i.e., engage with problem, student-led procedure and investigation, and act upon data). First, attendees reflect, problematize, and share about traditional classroom laboratories. Next, the presenters compare the models and frameworks of traditional and challenge-based learning experiences and strategize (e.g., do not limit goals, differentiate between amount of procedure/student agency, iterations of experimentation, optimize solution) to reconceptualization traditional laboratories into challenge-based learning experiences. Finally, the presenters challenge the attendees to redesign a traditional learning experience into a challenge-based learning experience; attendees share their redesigned experiences with their peers. All resources will be shared.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will conceptualize the challenge-based learning framework (i.e., engage, investigate, and act) and reimagine traditional classroom experiments into challenge-based learning experiences.

SPEAKERS:
Andrew Kipp (Texas A&M)

Building Teacher Capacity & Leadership Using Collaborative Spaces

Saturday, October 28 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 B


STRAND: Leadership and Advocacy

Show Details

How do we build teacher capacity and leadership skills using collaborative opportunities and content-focused coaching in an urban, high needs district? In New Brunswick, NJ, science supervisors, specialists, and district leaders worked together to support teachers in becoming science/STEM leaders and agents of change in the science field through the creation of a variety of collaborative spaces including high-quality professional development focusing on data-driven instructional practices, content-focused coaching sessions, and teacher-facilitated community events. Cohorts of grade 3-5 teachers engaged in the development of personal and district-wide content and pedagogical goals, reflected on the effectiveness of current science instructional practices & identified areas for growth, designed an implementation plan for the enactment of high-quality Science Instruction & 3D Assessments, and developed action steps to raise the profile of science education in the district and community.

TAKEAWAYS:
We will explore how to successfully and effectively build teacher capacity and leadership skills through high-quality professional development, focusing on data-driven instructional practices, content-focused coaching sessions, and teacher-facilitated community events.

SPEAKERS:
Cynthia Ruszczyk (New Brunswick Middle School: New Brunswick, NJ), Elizabeth Nunez (New Brunswick Public Schools: New Brunswick, NJ)

STOM: Crosscutting Concepts as Sensemaking Tools

Saturday, October 28 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 G



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA_STOM_CrosscuttingConcepts.pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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Four methods to integrate (Charles W. [Andy] Anderson): Identify productive questions and goals; Provide rules for sensemaking; Guide the search for evidence; Support analogical reasoning. Using the lesson example - Marshmallows in a Vacuum: Set up a vacuum chamber and place a marshmallow inside. Start removing the air from the chamber. Ask students to make observations of what they see. Once most of the air is removed, stop and reverse the air movement to return to the chamber. Take the mass before each step. Another lesson example, Cookie Alarm: Design a cookie jar that sounds an alarm every time someone opens the jar. Participants are provided a container and micro:bit that they use to construct a solution. We will look through what information we need to gather in order to find the optimum solution to the problem. This will be accomplished without participants needing to code or have access to materials.

TAKEAWAYS:
How to harness the power of CCC's as tools to assist students in making sense of phenomena or solving engineering problems.

SPEAKERS:
Susan German (Hallsville Middle School: Hallsville, MO)

Applying Crosscutting Concepts and Science and Engineering Practices to Elective Courses

Saturday, October 28 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2210


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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As a district, we have worked to ensure that all courses have three dimensional standards. We currently teach all of the NGSS standards by the completion of sophomore year. Our freshmen physical science course teaches the physical science standards and one-half of the earth science standards, while our sophomore biology course teaches the biology standards and the other one-half of the earth science standards. To meet the rigor of NGSS, our elective courses such as Chemistry, Physics, Environmental Science, Earth Science, Forensics Science and Plants and Propagation have all built upon the NGSS standards in content, along with identifying Science and Engineering Practices and Crosscutting Concepts. Our goal would be that participants would leave with a process in which they could do the same. Our process has been influenced by the 5 tools training as well as many of the NSTA publications designed to lead teachers and teacher leaders in standard development.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will leave with a process for creating elective standards that are three-dimensional.

SPEAKERS:
Teresa Bender (Omaha Northwest High School: No City, No State), Jennifer Rhine (Omaha Public Schools: Omaha, NE)

Questions and Crosscutting Concepts: How can we support students in asking good questions?

Saturday, October 28 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 F



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
CCCs.pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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The Framework requires that students engage in three-dimensional sensemaking around phenomena. In OpenSciEd units, this begins with the anchor lesson, in which students engage with a phenomenon in supported ways before generating the questions that drive the unit. Many teachers wonder how we get students to ask questions that align with the learning goals of the unit. In this session, participants will see for themselves how crosscutting concepts can appear in student questions and how those questions are motivated in the lesson. The presenters will discuss the important role crosscutting concepts play in supporting students' question generation, and participants will have an opportunity to see how students' initial questions and key crosscutting concepts continue to play a prominent role in sensemaking later in the storyline.

TAKEAWAYS:
Instruction can be designed so that crosscutting concepts are both a tool for student sensemaking as well as a desirable outcome. In particular, crosscutting concepts can help students ask questions that will be productive throughout a storylines unit.

SPEAKERS:
Whitney Mills (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO), Jamie Noll (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO), Dan Voss (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL)

Demystifying Models: Practical Modeling in the Science Classroom

Saturday, October 28 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2104 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
2023 NSTA Kansas City Conference Session Packet (1).pdf
NSTA Conference Student Modeling Examples.pdf
NSTA Conference_ _Approachable and Practical Modeling in the Science Classroom_ Session .pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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It can be daunting to incorporate scientific modeling in a practical and applicable way. This inquiry-centered session will address modeling in the science classroom through hands-on experiences and discussion using NGSS-linked phenomena. The goal of this session is to provide teachers with an overview of modeling routines while providing ready-to-use resources to demystify this Science and Engineering Practice. This practice is an essential springboard for student discourse and increasing their science literacy. Models give students the opportunity to reflect on their learning and see their thoughts evolve over time about a given natural phenomenon. Participants will have a hands-on experience explaining the phenomenon, “What is happening when the boiling water hits the cold air?”. Participants will construct models illustrating their scientific explanation of this phenomenon and engage in collegial discussions about how they can incorporate scientific modeling practices into their

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how to model a given natural phenomenon using scaffolds and ready-to-use resources for immediate classroom implementation.

SPEAKERS:
Brittany Blair (Charles H. Barrows STEM Academy: North Windham, CT), Nicole Vitello Lowell (Charles H. Barrows STEM Academy: North Windham, CT)

STEM Strategies for Developing Critical Thinking, Creativity, Communication, Collaboration, and Resilience

Saturday, October 28 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 C



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Presentation
Slide deck

STRAND: STEM Haven

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This presentation explores transdisciplinary STEM strategies that foster critical thinking, creativity, communication, collaboration, and resilience in students. The session will focus on providing learning opportunities that prioritize contexts of societal relevance and student/community interests, while highlighting the importance of having the skills and knowledge necessary to solve real-world problems. Participants will learn about phenomenon-based learning, unit planning with NGSS, inquiry-based lesson planning, and other strategies that promote student-centered learning. The presentation will also showcase strategies for integrating science, technology, engineering, and mathematics into the learning experience, emphasizing the importance of inclusive practices that recognize and value diverse perspectives. Through this session, participants will gain insights into how to create more inclusive and equitable learning environments in STEM education.

TAKEAWAYS:
This workshop focuses on equipping students with skills to solve real-world problems in STEM fields through relevant learning opportunities, effective tools and strategies, and the integration of 21st century skills.

SPEAKERS:
Kara Ball (Academic Officer: , MD)

STEMitizing Social Justice

Saturday, October 28 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 A


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The professional learning experience that will take place will be centered around creating lessons that are based on issues of social justice for science classes. These lessons will include a social justice issue (phenomena) for students to use the scientific process to provide solutions for the issue. Also, by the end of this learning experience, participants will be able to collaborate on ways to incorporate social justice projects to emphasize the utilization of the scientific process. The learning activities will be as follows: teachers will start by creating a list of social justice topics; teachers will also list units that are already established in their curriculum; once the list is generated, teachers will choose one topic that will already be taught, and brainstorm creative ways to incorporate a social justice topic into the subject matter.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how to insert relevant societal topics into their current science curriculum to increase student engagement.

SPEAKERS:
Anissa Williams (Niper Middle School: Kirkwood, MO)

Presentation to Publication: You Are Almost There!

Saturday, October 28 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 G


STRAND: Leadership and Advocacy

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Join this session to learn how to take your workshop or presentation to the next level -- published in one of the NSTA journals. NSTA has five journals spanning Pre-K to College: Science and Children (S&C), Science Scope (SS), The Science Teacher (TST), Journal of College Science Teaching (JCST), and Connected Science Learning (CSL). Each journal looks for new, innovative ideas for classroom application. In this session, you will learn how to prepare your work for submission, understand the review process, and the steps toward publication. What better way to reach a broader audience than publishing your work in an NSTA journal? The bulk of the work is done -- you've already created a workshop or presentation; now is the time to share your work with others by memorializing it in a journal. The publication process is straightforward and rewarding. So don't hesitate to take that next step in leadership and advocacy to get your work published.

TAKEAWAYS:
Come find out how to take your NSTA presentation to the next level -- published in an NSTA journal. Attendees will learn and be encouraged to reach even more people by publishing what was shared in their workshops and presentations.

SPEAKERS:
Elizabeth Barrett-Zahn (National Science Teaching Association)

Experiencing Engagement in Science

Saturday, October 28 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2101



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Presentation
This is the Canva I made for the presentation and it saved as a power point.

STRAND: Leadership and Advocacy

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Teachers and students are still adjusting to life in a post-pandemic classroom. There were many educational impacts in the wake of school closings during the pandemic. One of these was a dependence on technology that still lingers in the classroom today. While technology is important, it cannot replace the impact of a classroom environment that supports collaborative, student-centered, personalized learning. Teachers and students need to refresh themselves on how to engage in experiential learning again and how setting the right tone in your classroom can develop a supportive classroom environment. In this session, we will discuss different strategies and activities to build relationships with our students, how to incorporate student-centered learning, and how student engagement leads to motivation.

TAKEAWAYS:
The main takeaway from this session is a collection of engagement strategies and best practices to use in a classroom setting to establish a classroom culture supportive of student-centered, personalized learning.

SPEAKERS:
Michelle Norwood (Sangaree Middle School: Ladson, SC)

Students as Scientists: Nature-Based Inquiry

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2104 B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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Discover our newest curriculum, “Students as Scientists: Nature-based Inquiry”. This free curriculum is designed to engage all students in hands-on, authentic, inquiry projects inspired by nature. The curriculum is NGSS aligned, grade-banded K-5 and 6-12, and teacher co-written and reviewed. We intentionally diversified the people representing scientists and incorporated culturally responsive and sustaining techniques. Learn how to harness questions that arise from observing nature and help students discover their inner scientist with materials that aid teachers in scaffolding authentic inquiry. Questions might range from “How do the kinds of birds we see change during the year?” to “Why aren’t we seeing more butterflies at our school and what can we do to get more to visit?” to “How good is the water quality in the stream that runs through town?” By engaging in nature-based investigations, students develop their science skills and engage in science practices.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will explore our latest K-5 and 6-12 inquiry curriculum, discover tips and techniques for engaging all learners in nature-based inquiry investigations, and discuss ways to make inquiry learning relevant to your students.

SPEAKERS:
Susan Licher (Cornell Lab of Ornithology: Ithaca, NY)

Developing a Framework for Multidimensional Science Education

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
FWISD Science Instructional Framework
Slides

STRAND: Leadership and Advocacy

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The Fort Worth ISD Science Framework takes a culturally responsive, multidimensional approach to science instruction and assessment. When these multiple dimensions are intentionally planned for and incorporated into science instruction and assessment, students move from being receivers of knowledge to active constructors of knowledge, increasing educational excellence for all and moving students toward becoming scientifically informed, ethical, and responsible citizens who can advocate for justice-centered solutions to societal challenges. Participants will learn about the process taken to develop the Fort Worth ISD Science Framework and how district science coordinators worked to get stakeholders on board as they prepared for the adoption and implementation of new standards.

TAKEAWAYS:
The creation of a framework for multidimensional science education can support the implementation of new standards and help to get stakeholders on board.

SPEAKERS:
Jessica Hilbert (Fort Worth ISD: Fort Worth, TX), Genedra Trotter (Fort Worth ISD), Brooke Whitworth (Clemson University: Clemson, SC)

Improving Science Literacy with Problem-Based Learning

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2101



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Slides Science Literacy and PBL

STRAND: Research to Practice

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Using research and facts to support decisions is a skill our students need to learn. Problem-based learning allows students to come up with multiple solutions to a problem and then, through the use of research, experimentation, and failure, students learn to scientifically support their thoughts and ideas. Problem-based learning helps students learn science content while also building important 21st century skills and lifelong practices. In a world where content facts are readily available and resources are waiting to me explores, students have the opportunity to see how their learning relates to current careers, as well as the opportunity to share their insights with others. Students get to explore literature while engaging in problem solving and science exploration.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will gain a better understanding of how to improve literacy while incorporating problem-based learning into the required units of study through discussion and brainstorming with peers on the use of Problem-Based practices.

SPEAKERS:
Charlsie Prosser (Education Professor and Chair: Baldwin City, KS), Tara Burnham (Assistant Professor of Education)

Teaching Science with Science Fiction

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2104 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Teaching Science Through Science Fiction
Teaching Science Through Science Fiction-Kansas City Presentation Science Fiction list for middle to high school Science Fiction Presentation Rubric

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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This presentation will consider the benefits of science fiction use in the science classroom and how SF is deeply tied to ethics. It will also give evidence of the many groundbreaking scientists and inventors who were inspired by science fiction. Classroom SF activities that encourage deep discussions about science and its place in society will be highlighted, as will suggestions for stories, movies, and novels that teach concepts in earth, space, physical, and life sciences. Detailed information about the SF genre and the impact of SF stories on science education and scientific literacy will be discussed. Participants will receive lesson plans and resources along with detailed lists of titles to integrate SF into their specific discipline, as well as history and literature links. Educators will participate in a lesson on biomes using SF as a medium for reviewing concepts and growing student interest in science. Classic authors and ways to integrate their stories will also be shown.

TAKEAWAYS:
Detailed ideas and resources for teaching concepts using science fiction in physical, earth, space, and life sciences, as well as history and literature.

SPEAKERS:
Kimberly Collingwood (Westwind Intermediate School: Phoenix, AZ)

The Matter-Energy-Forces Triangle: A Common Approach to Make Sense of Physics, Chemistry, Biology, and Earth Science in OpenSciEd

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 H


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

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Many students experience high school science without considering the interconnectedness of different domains. By leveraging the Energy and Matter crosscutting concept and uniting this lens with a forces perspective, we consider how a Matter-Energy-Forces (MEF) triangle can help students apply core principles of physical science across multiple domains. We explore the MEF triangle’s use in three different units that highlight Earth and Space Science alongside Biology, Physics or Chemistry to make explicit connections to the crosscutting concept of energy and matter and core life and physical science Disciplinary Core Ideas. Examples include fires, polar ice melt, tectonic plate motion, and meteors. We also consider how this tool could be useful for students over the course of many units and how it can increase access to more difficult life and physical science concepts through the use of this routine. Participants will practice applying the MEF triangle to phenomena in their contexts.

TAKEAWAYS:
The Framework calls for “a common use of language about energy and matter across the disciplines in science instruction.” The MEF triangle uses cues and prompts to draw attention to interactions between matter, energy, and forces to help students make sense of complex phenomena across domains.

SPEAKERS:
Whitney Mills (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO), Jamie Noll (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO), Dan Voss (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Diego Rojas-Perilla (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO)

Teaching Science with Superheroes: Engage Students with Illustrations from Movies, TV, Comics, and More!

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2104 A


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Student engagement is a vital element for effective science instruction (Heddy & Sinatra, 2013). However, students typically become less engaged in science as they advance in school years (Ofsted, 2015). Superheroes have been a mainstay in popular culture and multimedia for decades. Science teachers can harness this widespread interest to enhance lessons, broaden assessments, and increase student engagement. Participants will examine multiple superhero examples, each with applications to specific NGSS performance expectations. They will also consider research content from science journals and organizations (National Geographic, Scientific American, NASA, NOAA, WHO, etc.) to catalyze further exploration and extensions. In addition to specific activities, teachers will practice analyzing popular culture and research for wider engagement. They will also review important copyright parameters and “fair use” in the classroom, with an emphasis on appropriate implementation.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants in this interactive session will examine a variety of multimedia superhero examples, with a focus on immediate classroom implementation AND legal copyright “fair use.” In addition to specific lessons, teachers will practice analyzing and applying media and research to engage students.

SPEAKERS:
Daniel Bergman (Wichita State University: Wichita, KS)

The Power of Self-Documentation: Using Students Funds of Knowledge Toward Assessment

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2104 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1FQZrSxAQlkcZIbQaj2qqoJeB0Dl0quOEC0hC6_DX6J0/edit?usp=sharing

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

How do you see what science knowledge your students bring to the units you are teaching in your classroom? This session will showcase a STEM Teaching Tool of Self-Documentation where students give you, the teacher, insight as to what knowledge they bring to your science unit along with their cultural stance. The presentation will show how self-documentation is used in a middle school science classroom. Teachers will also go through the steps of self-documentation themselves, as well as be presented information about what information students can share about what Science Sense they might have.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. This session will provide knowledge of how to use self-documentation in the classroom. 2. Teachers will understand the importance of gaining your students' perspective in what they bring to your classroom culturally. 3. Self-documentation gives teachers knowledge of student misconceptions.

SPEAKERS:
Betsy Lawrence (Summit Trail Middle School: Olathe, KS)

Bridging the Gap Through Partnerships

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 A