2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

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Rooms and times subject to change.
5 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Using Pan and Digital Balances to Describe and Compare Weight

Friday, October 27 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Different Instruments for Quantifying Qualifying Weight
Weight measurement with pan and digital balances.

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The poster aims to present student ideas about mathematics and computational thinking (MCT) in the context of weight (elementary) or mass (secondary). Standards K-PS2-1 and 3-PS2-1 emphasize and guide the three-dimensional approach. Participants consider the differences and similarities between a pan and digital balance with a Venn diagram. Students typically think of weight as a quantitative measure. The pan balance can be used to describe the weight of an object both qualitatively and quantitatively. In mathematics education, pan balances quantify the weight of objects with a set of known weights. Weighted plastic of one, five, or ten increments placed on one side of the pan quantitatively measures the ”weight” of the object on the other pan. Educators use “weight” to describe “mass” and refer to heaviness or the amount of stuff an object has at the elementary level. Comparing and contrasting quantities and relationships align with the SEP of using MCT.

TAKEAWAYS:
After comparing the weight of two or more objects with a pan and digital balance, a Venn diagram structures students' thinking about the weight measurement tools. We present students’ ideas about balances and offer strategies to uncover students’ ideas about qualitative and quantitative measurements.

SPEAKERS:
Jaclyn Murray (Mercer University: Macon, GA)

The Chemistry and Statistics of the U.S. Penny

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Big Joe Turner B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

How can we assess the quality of sampling and variability of the data to help us in decision-making? The various metals and alloys used in the minting of the penny over the years will provide for rich explorations, which are part of the chemistry curriculum. We will highlight the important cross-disciplinary aspect, linking the science content (mass/chemical composition) to the mathematical models outlined in the NGSS section on Systems and Models to show how to use it to simulate systems and interactions. Through hands-on activities and the use of technology, participants will explore a variety of data sets and use this knowledge to better understand and use statistics to make accurate and fair arguments related to everyday topics. We will explore how the sample mean varies from sample to sample. While this is considered one of the more challenging topics for quality control, we will illustrate the concepts though some basic sampling of the typical age and mass of the U.S. penny.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will use real data to develop mathematical models and learn how to test our hypothesis by performing an experiment and analyzing the results, combining chemical analysis with statistical sampling for a cross-curricular approach.

SPEAKERS:
Karlheinz Haas (Science/Math Instructor, Retired: Tequesta, FL)

Meeting the Challenges of Math & Computation with OpenSciEd HS

Saturday, October 28 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 H



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA Kansas City Presentation Math Progression Doc.pdf
Supporting mathematics progressions in OpenSciEd HS - NSTA 2023 Kansas City.pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The HS-level NGSS practices of Analyzing Data (SEP 4) and Using Mathematical and Computational thinking (SEP 5) present a quandary: most HS-level curricula separate math into a rote set of instructional materials like the “stoichiometry unit” or the “forces calculations.” We illustrate a different approach, using OpenSciEd Biology, Chemistry, and Physics units to show how to meet the 3D vision of NGSS and not artificially separating content from mathematical modeling or calculations. By leveraging mathematical thinking contextually and just-in-time, students engage with these practices as sensemaking tools, deepening student understanding of the science and fluency in employing math in novel ways. We explore how complex engagement with these practices is supported in high school courses and discuss how to meet the demands of mathematical thinking in various contexts.

TAKEAWAYS:
Leveraging data analysis and mathematical thinking in the context of meaningful phenomena and problems like food sovereignty, rather than frontloading rote math “skills,” helps students engage with these practices as sensemaking tools, deepening student understanding of both science and math.

SPEAKERS:
Wayne Wright (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Nicole Vick (Northwestern University), Michael Novak (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL)

Enhancing Science Notebooks with Scientific Sketching and Nature Journaling

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2214



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Enhancing Science Notebooks with Nature Journaling

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Attendees will learn techniques and strategies for incorporating scientific sketching and nature journaling into students’ science notebook routines by engaging in the activities themselves. Materials and natural physical specimens will be provided for journaling and sketching activities. Student examples and free resources will be shared. This workshop is appropriate for all K-12 teachers and informal science educators.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will be introduced to, and participate in, several nature journaling activities from the free John Muir Laws "How to Teach Nature Journaling" book, as well as receive some scientific sketching guidance from the California Academy of Sciences. Special attention to integrating math will be included.

SPEAKERS:
Dana Atwood-Blaine (University of Northern Iowa: Cedar Falls, IA)

Connecting Math and Science Through Technology: Data Analysis Made Easy

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2504 B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The workshop will offer ideas to move from the typical teacher-led classroom to one that focuses on problem-solving, data analysis and exploratory learning. Learn how to combine graphing calculators with handheld sensors to maximize class time and provide opportunities for engaging inquiry and discussion. We will illustrate how you can utilize science tasks to support your 3-D initiative and the goals outlined in the NGSS, while at the same time reinforcing and seamlessly integrating CCSS for Mathematics. You can use one sensor at a time or multiple sensors simultaneously for lab-based or in-the-field data collection to quickly collect and analyze data. Several sensors will be available to explore this integrated solution. Hands-on science using this integrated technology gets students excited about science and math and deepens their understanding of seemingly complex concepts. It will free up class time for student engagement in the analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of real data.

TAKEAWAYS:
Use real data to develop mathematical models and learn how to test your hypothesis by performing an experiment and analyzing your results, combining graphing calculators with handheld sensors to maximize class time.

SPEAKERS:
Karlheinz Haas (Science/Math Instructor, Retired: Tequesta, FL)

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