2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

Grade Level


Topics
























Strands











Session Type














Pathway/Course














FILTERS APPLIED:Students and Sensemaking, Physical Science

 

Rooms and times subject to change.
36 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

How to Promote and Support Learning After Introducing a Phenomenon

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The session will give teachers an opportunity to participate in the same sort of rich and meaningful learning experiences that are called for by the NGSS. This session, as a result, will include approximately forty minutes of audience participation in student hat. Teachers will leave with high-quality instructional materials that they can use in their own classrooms. The agenda for this session is: • A discussion of characteristics of phenomenon-based instruction and sensemaking (5 mins). • A discussion of obstacles to sensemaking during a learning experience (10 minutes). • An opportunity for participants to experience an example of how support learners use DCIs, CCs, and SEPs during a learning experience in a way that makes the process of sensemaking useful and inclusive (40 mins). • Questions and suggestions for learning more (5 mins).

TAKEAWAYS:
Introducing meaningful phenomena is necessary, but not sufficient for fostering sensemaking. Students must also have opportunities to use DCIs, CCs, and SEPs during the learning experience, and the experience must be structured in ways that make the process of sensemaking useful and inclusive.

SPEAKERS:
Victor Sampson (The University of Texas at Austin: Austin, TX)

Extreme Living: Making Sense of Changing Weather Patterns and Designing Solutions

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

This presentation will provide teachers with a ready-to-teach Unit designed to help their students experience several Physical Science, Earth-Space Science, and Engineering NGSS standards. The unit addresses global weather patterns and the impacts of potential pattern changes. It also addresses thermal energy and its applications in building design. All middle school science teachers; whether new to the profession, new to phenomena-based learning, or seasoned veterans will find something new and exciting to bring back to their classrooms. This Unit combines my understanding of the middle school science classroom with expertise of curriculum writers at Pacific Education Institute. Teachers will receive help planning lessons, activities, and discussions. They will also take the role of a student to have first-hand experience with labs and activities. Teachers will receive a digital copy of all of the instructional materials including grading rubrics.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will learn how to teach and assess a dynamic 3-D unit addressing Physical Science and Earth Space Science NGSS Standards. Teachers will leave with editable access to all Unit materials. Teachers will get time and guidance on how to adapt the Unit to their classroom and student needs.

SPEAKERS:
Kathryn Chamberlain (Olympic High School: Silverdale, WA)

Supporting Meaningful Sensemaking Before, During, and After Science Investigations

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2201


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The purpose of this session is to engage participants as learners in the process of making sense of a phenomenon through engaging in scientific practices. The modeled lesson provides attendees with a shared learning experience similar to that of a typical science classroom, seeded with instructional strategies designed to support their sensemaking before, during, and after an investigation. Attendees will be introduced to a phenomenon, provided materials to carry out an investigation, given a model scaffold to record their thinking, and a talk tool to support equitable idea sharing and listening. They will reflect on their experience as learners, debriefing sensemaking strategies, and using the four attributes of sensemaking (phenomena, science and engineering practices, student ideas, and science ideas) to reflect on the model lesson and their classrooms.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will walk away with a greater understanding of how key science practices work in tandem to support student sensemaking and will experience tools like model scaffolds, driving question boards, and talk tools designed to support learners in explaining phenomena.

SPEAKERS:
Alex Gerber (Instructional Specialist: University City, MO), Heather Milo (Washington University in St. Louis: St. Louis, MO)

Waves: Comparing Colors in Sunglasses

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2501 D


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: Lab-Aids

Students collect evidence which indicates that different colors of light carry different amounts of energy. Students analyze and interpret light transmission graphs for three different lenses. They determine which sunglass lens (structure) provides the best protection (function) for the eyes.

Energize Claims and Evidence through Smithsonian Science for the Classroom

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2505 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: Carolina Biological Supply Co.

Experience how science lessons can be structured using teacher instructional slides, where students work in groups, with specific roles, to develop claims [about how motion energy moves and changes] based on evidence observed through hands-on experiences. Leave with classroom resources.

SPEAKERS:
Hoover Herrera (Carolina Biological Supply Co.: Burlington, NC)

Equitable Unit Designs With Lab-Aids and SEPUP: Recovering Copper

Thursday, October 26 • 10:50 AM - 11:50 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2501 D


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: Lab-Aids

Learn about the intentional design of our units to embed equitable opportunities in phenomenon-based learning. This hands-on workshop uses a model activity showing how students use data to develop an evidence-based argument supporting the best way to recover copper from a waste solution.

It All Begins with Water

Thursday, October 26 • 10:50 AM - 11:50 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 1501 C


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: 3D Molecular Designs

Everything is dependent on water. Explore several properties of this remarkable compound with tried-and-true phenomena. Learn multiple ways to model those phenomena using the Water Kit©.

SPEAKERS:
Ruth Hutson (Blue Valley High/Middle School: Randolph, KS)

Physically Active Modeling For Comparing States of Matter

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2104 A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Ideal Gas Law Students as Particles Activity Handout.docx
Physically Active Modeling Ideal Gas Laws Lesson Plan.docx
Physically Active Modeling States of Matter (1).pptx
Physically Active Modeling States of Matter Blank Handout NSTA 2023 .docx
Physically Active Modeling States of Matter Slides Handout NSTA 2023 KC.docx
QR Code Physically Active Modeling For States Of Matter NSTA 2023.png

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

This activity has students/participants act as particles. To start, participants are given baseline information about how attractive forces between particles can vary from very strong to negligible, & that particles are always in motion. Participants then split into three groups, strong, moderate, & weak forces. To model very strong forces participants link arms at the elbow, for moderately strong forces they hold hands, & for weak/negligible forces they can only hold each other’s pinky fingers. Participants start far apart & move very slowly to model a very cold temperature. At this speed, all of the participants are able to catch onto each other & form an organized structure (solid). With each iteration the participants move faster; this results in the weak-force group not being able to form a structure (gas), the moderate-force group being clumped together but not organized (liquid), & the strong-force group still being able to form an organized structure (solid).

TAKEAWAYS:
Students will not only know the properties of solids, liquids, and gasses, but will be able to give in-depth explanations as to WHY the properties are different by behaving as the particles at different temperatures and with different attractive forces.

SPEAKERS:
Clark Ellis (The Kinkaid School)

I’ll Have Another Drink…And Another…And Another... A 3-D Lesson to Investigate and Make Sense of the Drinking Bird Phenomenon

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The drinking bird is a classic heat engine toy that has been featured in popular culture. Although the cause-and-effect relationship for this phenomenon is clear, the mechanism for its repetitive movement is puzzling for most students. In this workshop, participants will use investigative and sensemaking practices to explore the drinking bird phenomenon. This interactive 3-D lesson is in alignment with the goals, standards, and practices of the NGSS. In addition, tips to enhance the development and use of student explanatory models will be featured.

TAKEAWAYS:
Workshop participants will experience an interactive and engaging three-dimensional lesson that is in alignment with the goals and practices of the Next Generation Science Standards. In addition, tips to enhance the development and use of student-created explanatory models will be featured.

SPEAKERS:
Bryan Horan (Northport - East Northport UFSD: Northport, NY)

“AUTHOR” Activating Students' Ideas! Linking Formative Assessment to Instructional Sequence

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 C


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Activating Students' Ideas! is a one-stop professional learning experience that will inspire you to reimagine how you teach. This session discusses how two popular teaching resources can be used in tandem: (1) Uncovering Student Ideas formative assessment probes and (2) Explore-before-explain teaching. We show how simple shifts in arranging and combining activities help students construct knowledge while allowing you to put the three dimensions of the K-12 Science Education Frameworks into practice. The session includes: (1) A concise review of research on why the order in which you structure your lessons is so critical; (2) The critical planning considerations for becoming an “explore-before-explain” teacher; (3) Ready-to-teach lessons that use science phenomena as a hook to provide an interdisciplinary learning experience; and (4) Reflection questions will spark thinking throughout the sequencing process and help you develop the knowledge to adapt these concepts to you

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn about a resource for formative assessment and explore-before-explain teaching.

SPEAKERS:
Patrick Brown (Fort Zumwalt School District R-II: O'Fallon, MO)

How Do You Support Students Through Productive Struggle?

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 1501 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: Great Minds

In this workshop, participants undergo a challenging student experience as they work through a complex investigation. Throughout the course of the session, participants discover the importance of fostering an environment that encourages challenges where students can struggle in a safe space.

SPEAKERS:
Sally Robichaux (Great Minds: Washington, DC)

Infographics: Increasing Visual Literacy

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Infographics: Improving Visual Literacy Participant Handout
This link provides access to this session's participant handout.
Infographics: Improving Visual Literacy Presentation Slides
This link is for access to the presentation slide deck.

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Students today are exposed to an information-rich environment that is inundated with visual images. Likewise, science relies heavily on the use of visuals to present technical information. Instructional strategies will be shared that use infographics to engage students with the science and engineering practices to make sense of complex information quickly and clearly. Participants will experience a “think-aloud” to extrapolate information from an infographic and work through an evaluation tool to determine its scientific credibility. In addition, they will learn ways to incorporate infographics to spark debate, construct a scientific argument using the claim-evidence-reasoning framework, and complete a problem analysis to find a solution to an everyday problem. Finally, resources will be shared in how to develop student-created infographics.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn instructional strategies to support student sensemaking through the use of visually-rich infographics. This includes using science and engineering practices to analyze and interpret data, construct explanations, and engage in argument from evidence in secondary classrooms.

SPEAKERS:
Tina Hovance (Katy ISD: Katy, TX)

Exploring Sound Waves Using The Human Body & Simple Instruments

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2102 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/12EMQcx20vFs6XNBkoL-vsq2PosR1Dt2V

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Slides with diagrams of the anatomy of the larynx are shown with the parts & functions being described to participants. As the anatomy is being taught there will be breaks for participants to talk to each other while feeling their throats, chest, nose, mouth, jaw, etc to feel the vibrations & notice how damping the vibrations changes how participants sound to themselves & others. Next, videos of an opera singer in an MRI machine are shown to see the anatomy in action. After this whistles, & recorders will be passed out for participants to play the same note but hear the difference in sound. A visualizer showing the relative amplitude of each frequency is used as participants play so they can see that each instrument creates its own unique set of waves in addition to the fundamental tone that is being played. The process is repeated for multiple singers that are singing the same note.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will be able to use direct instruction, demonstrations, and short activities to explain the basics of how human voices are able to produce sound, why each person/instrument has a unique sound, and why your voice sounds different to you than it does on recordings.

SPEAKERS:
Brendan Emig (Middle/Upper School Choral Director: Houston, TX), Clark Ellis (The Kinkaid School)

The Highs and Lows of the Weather - A Look Into Nor'easters and The Winter Bomb Cyclone

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2105


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The conceptual understanding of the interactions between Earth Systems, particularly the atmosphere and the hydrosphere, allows students to expand their knowledge further of concepts like weather, climate, and climate change. But research (Dove, 1999; Henriques, 2002; Phillips, 1991) shows that teachers and students have a poor understanding of basic weather-related concepts. In this workshop, teachers will be given a 5E lesson incorporating activities that will enable them to better integrate the phenomena of high and low-pressure systems (Disciplinary Core Idea ESS2D) into their curriculum. Besides the 5E lesson, participants will receive additional resources for implementing how these highs and lows interact during the winter to produce Nor'easters and Midwestern Winter Bomb systems. This workshop aims to better prepare those teaching about this important phenomenon in our nation's classrooms.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will be given a 5E lesson incorporating activities that will enable them to integrate better the phenomena of high- and low-pressure systems into their curriculum. Participants will also receive additional resources on incorporating winter weather systems in the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Dannah Schaffer (Minot State University: Minot, ND)

Making Physics Engaging & Accessible for All Students (even those who struggle with math)

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Jay McShann B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

My first years of teaching Physics at Title 1 schools in Memphis were challenging. Many of my students were very behind, especially in math. However, I developed 5 strategies to make learning physics accessible and they completely transformed my classroom. 1. “Building Block” Method The biggest breakthrough in my classroom was breaking long problems down into building blocks. I will show how to do this with a sample forces unit. 2. Pre-manipulated equations I will share an equation sheet that shows all forms of each equation. It is a game-changer for students who struggle with algebra. 3. Setting-Up for Success I will model a consistent way to help students stay organized on different types of problems. 4. Simplifying Motion I will illustrate how to solve motion problems using simpler notation and simpler equations. 5. Simplifying Circuits I will show how to use the “routes method” so students can solve most circuits in a more conceptual way.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will come away from this session with strategies that they can immediately implement in their classrooms to make physics more accessible and engaging, especially for their lower-level learners.

SPEAKERS:
Jack Replinger (FormerTeacher / Founder: , WA)

Unlocking Science Success: Navigating Middle School Learning Progressions

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2505 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: Carolina Biological Supply Co.

Take a deeper dive into understanding the importance of learning progressions in 3-dimensional learning using STC Middle School. Experience the importance of a coherent story line in student understanding. Leave with classroom resources.

SPEAKERS:
Cory Ort (Carolina Biological Supply Co.: Burlington, NC)

Crash Cushion Design Challenge: A Lesson on Collisions

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2502 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: PASCO

Give your students a real-world engineering challenge! Explore the relationship between momentum and impact forces by designing and testing crash barriers with live collision data.

Circuits Made Easy: Untangle Your Circuit Labs!

Friday, October 27 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2502 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: PASCO

Experience the best way to teach basic circuits! Learn how to build circuits with modular components that look identical to schematic drawings. We'll show you how to skip the tangled wires that confuse students and focus on the physics.

Developing and Using Models: Measuring and Graphing Speed

Friday, October 27 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2501 D


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: Lab-Aids

This interactive workshop uses a model cart system with ramps to help students learn to measure speed and rate. They also match segments of a distance-vs-time graph to portions of a narrative to help conceptualize the meaning behind slopes on motion graphs.

Ways to Structure Student Discussions to Increase Participation and Collaborative Sensemaking

Friday, October 27 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2210


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The session will give teachers an opportunity to participate in the same sort of rich and meaningful learning experiences that are called for by the NGSS. This session, as a result, will include approximately forty minutes of audience participation in student hat. Teachers will leave with high-quality instructional materials that they can use in their own classrooms. The agenda for this session is: • A discussion of characteristics of collaborative sensemaking and productive discussions (5 mins). • A discussion of some of the challenges with promoting and supporting productive discussions where all students participate during a learning experience (10 minutes). • An opportunity for participants to experience an example of productive small group discussion that fosters collaborative sense-making (20 mins). • An opportunity for participants to experience an example of productive whole class discussion (20 mins). • Questions and suggestions for learning more (5 mins).

TAKEAWAYS:
Collaborative sensemaking requires productive and inclusive talk. Teachers can foster productive talk between students using specific activity structures, talk prompts, talk moves, and supports.

SPEAKERS:
Victor Sampson (The University of Texas at Austin: Austin, TX)

Keep Calm and Chemistry On: Successful Lab Activities for the New Chemistry Teacher

Friday, October 27 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2505 B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: Carolina Biological Supply Co.

Explore easy, engaging, and safe chemistry activities that guarantee a reaction in your students. Whether you’re new to chemistry or feeling out of your element, create excitement with hands-on labs and demonstrations.

SPEAKERS:
Laurie Nixon (Watauga High School: Boone, NC)

Process Over Product: Student Sensemaking Through Modeling

Friday, October 27 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

In this poster session, we highlight how two 5th-grade teachers of linguistically diverse students strategically used the Science and Engineering Practice of Developing and Using Models over the course of a physical science unit to increase opportunities for sensemaking with all students. First, we show sample models from multilingual learners across three time points in the unit: initial, revised, and final model. At each time point, we highlight what the teachers did to elicit and interpret student thinking. In particular, we share how “final models” can serve as a more authentic end-of-unit task when an iterative modeling process has been enacted. We describe how the teachers’ own perceptions of modeling changed over the course of the unit. As a result of heightened student sensemaking with the more iterative modeling process, the teachers shifted away from positioning models as products and toward positioning models as evidence of current and evolving sensemaking.

TAKEAWAYS:
By strategically allowing all students, particularly multilingual learners, to develop and use increasingly sophisticated models over time, teachers shifted away from “models as products” and toward “models as evidence of sensemaking.”

SPEAKERS:
Iovanna Williams (Science Teacher: , NY), Adriana Romanzo (Elementary Science Teacher: New York, NY), Abigail Schwenger (Research Associate)

Make Your Own Poly-density Bottles

Friday, October 27 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Poly Density Bottles Poster1.jpg

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Polydensity bottles are made with salt, isopropyl alcohol, water, UV beads, and pony beads. These materials are easily accessible and relatively inexpensive. With the polydensity bottles, students can engage in sensemaking related to density, molecular properties, solubility, and other concepts supported by the NRC K-12 Framework. Students can be challenged to complete calculations and create their own bottles, or teachers can make bottles to be used as an introductory or anchoring phenomenon. This session will provide multiple ideas on ways to use these interesting bottles to give students at multiple levels the opportunity to engage in sensemaking and Science Practices. Instructions will be given for creating bottles with multiple recipes, and sources of instructional materials will be provided to participants.

TAKEAWAYS:
Poly density bottles are an effective and inexpensive way to provide a discrepant event to intrigue students. Students at various levels can engage with this phenomenon to engage in sensemaking as they employ several different concepts in Physical Science.

SPEAKERS:
Kelly Moore (Tennessee Tech: Cookeville, TN)

Using Pan and Digital Balances to Describe and Compare Weight

Friday, October 27 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Different Instruments for Quantifying Qualifying Weight
Weight measurement with pan and digital balances.

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The poster aims to present student ideas about mathematics and computational thinking (MCT) in the context of weight (elementary) or mass (secondary). Standards K-PS2-1 and 3-PS2-1 emphasize and guide the three-dimensional approach. Participants consider the differences and similarities between a pan and digital balance with a Venn diagram. Students typically think of weight as a quantitative measure. The pan balance can be used to describe the weight of an object both qualitatively and quantitatively. In mathematics education, pan balances quantify the weight of objects with a set of known weights. Weighted plastic of one, five, or ten increments placed on one side of the pan quantitatively measures the ”weight” of the object on the other pan. Educators use “weight” to describe “mass” and refer to heaviness or the amount of stuff an object has at the elementary level. Comparing and contrasting quantities and relationships align with the SEP of using MCT.

TAKEAWAYS:
After comparing the weight of two or more objects with a pan and digital balance, a Venn diagram structures students' thinking about the weight measurement tools. We present students’ ideas about balances and offer strategies to uncover students’ ideas about qualitative and quantitative measurements.

SPEAKERS:
Jaclyn Murray (Mercer University: Macon, GA)

Computing Earth's System's -- A Project {FUTURE} Computer Science Integrated Unit

Friday, October 27 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

In Wisconsin, 5th-grade students develop models to explain how Earth's systems interact. 10 Milwaukee Public Schools are engaged in Project {FUTURE}; a DOA research and outreach grant as partners with Marquette and Sacred Heart Universities to bring Computer Science into elementary classrooms. A group of these Project {FUTURE} teachers are members of a collaborative cohort developing integrated computer science units. These units embed and bridge Computer Science content, such as algorithms and programming, into other content areas. The highlighted "novel" integrated unit connects the science topic of Earth's systems to the beginning computer programming language of Blockly to create interactive models using CODE.org's Sprite Lab. The culminating project requires students to incorporate research and data gathered on two or more of Earth's systems, and create an interactive app using sprites, variables, and simulations within CODE.org Computer Science Fundamental Course F.

TAKEAWAYS:
The poster session will outline the collaborative process experienced by a cohort of teachers in designing integrated computer science units. The featured Earth's System unit embeds computer science components of programming and algorithms with the WI and NGSS grade 5 standards for physical science.

SPEAKERS:
Renee Scianni (Milwaukee Public Schools: Milwaukee, WI)

How Much Physics Can You Do with a Meter Stick?

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2502 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Sponsoring Company: PASCO

Rediscover the most versatile tool in your physics lab: the meter stick! Learn how to facilitate investigations of rotation, torque, optics, and even Lenz's law using the PASCO Aluminum Meter Stick and accessories.

Crafting Three-Dimensional Multiple Choice Questions & More

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Mary Lou Williams



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Presentation
Revision History of Written Assessment

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

I will take participants through my process of crafting sets of formative multiple choice questions that each use 2 of the 3 dimensions of NGSS, so that all dimensions are addressed. I will also show my process for refining free response questions to get the exact responses I am looking for and that allow for an ease of grading and seeing students’ understanding. I will provide examples from my own classroom & direct them to where they can find more examples from various storylines. As an iHub Chemistry writer, I learned to write 3-D multiple choice formative questions. An assessment graduate course taught me how to write quality distractors to see limits of student understanding and get useful feedback data. I merge these 2 in my own classroom to create assessments to get to what my students know. I will share my learning from these trainings and more to set teachers on the path to quality 3-D classroom assessments.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn to craft three-dimensional assessments, multiple choice, and free response. Using quality distractors in multiple choice formatives allows you to pinpoint student misconceptions. Free response questions direct students to the specific response you want so that grading goes quicker.

SPEAKERS:
Sarah Evans (Olathe South High School: Olathe, KS)

Stepping into the shoes of a radiologist: isotopes, medicine, and cell division

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Lester Young B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Slides (for use with students)
Student handout

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Engage your students with a real-world application of physical sciences and biology through our scaffolded nuclear radiology case study. Nuclear medicine is a branch of radiology that uses radioactive materials to diagnose and treat disease. The purpose of this session is to introduce students to medical imaging and nuclear medicine alongside Next Generation Science Standards as they attempt to diagnose and treat a hypothetical patient. In addition to fostering critical thinking, this session connects FDG-PET (a type of nuclear imaging) to the following next generation science standards: 1) Develop models to illustrate the changes in the composition of the nucleus of the atom and the energy released during … fission, fusion, and radioactive decay. (HS-PS1-8), and 2) Use a model to illustrate the role of cellular division (mitosis) and differentiation in producing and maintaining complex organisms. (HS-LS1-4).

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will feel prepared to incorporate a nuclear radiology problem-based learning activity (developed by a radiologist and science teacher team) into their own classrooms!

SPEAKERS:
Peter Gunderman (Radiologist), Tina Ahmadi (PhD Student: Indianapolis, IN)

Why did the acid go to the gym? To become a little buffer!

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Big Joe Turner B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Why did the acid to go the gym_ To be a little buffer. (1).pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Teachers will explore a data collection activity to investigate pH and a pH titration curve. Teachers will also explore a variety of card sorts, hands-on activities to model acid base chemistry as well as the application of buffers in real world situations.

TAKEAWAYS:
Acid base chemistry and buffers are difficult concepts for students to grasp. This session will help teachers create and modify traditional lecture activities to be student-centered, hands-on learning opportunities.

SPEAKERS:
Chris Coker (Camden Fairview High School: Camden, AR), Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA)

Implementing Differentiation Strategies in High School Classrooms

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Truman B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Implementing Differentiation Slides

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Differentiation in the science classroom is essential for student learning, allowing students to enter the lesson from different points and gain the tools to access material and ensure enduring understanding. In this session, participants will learn about a variety of strategies they can use in their classroom to engage students, identify misconceptions, provide varied practice activities, and offer choices in the learning progression. Differentiation seems to be a wide umbrella, but this session aims to narrow the focus and provide teachers with tools and tips they can implement as soon as they’re home from NSTA!

TAKEAWAYS:
Takeaway a deeper understanding of approaches to differentiation, including both small- and large-scale strategies that are applicable to all science classrooms. Strategies range from simple techniques that can be implemented during a portion of one class, to unit-long approaches.

SPEAKERS:
Kellie Dean (Adlai E. Stevenson High School: Lincolnshire, IL), Jin Kyung Hwang (Adlai E. Stevenson High School: Lincolnshire, IL), Molly Sponseller (Adlai E. Stevenson High School: Lincolnshire, IL)

Energizing Sensemaking with LOL Energy Models

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 1501 B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The presentation will include background information detailing how the presenters traditionally taught energy concepts in their physical science, chemistry, and physics classrooms and then gained familiarity with LOL diagrams and implemented this tool in their own classrooms. The presenters will outline why a shift in the instructional approach was needed and how use of this tool can help students to better understand the abstract concept of energy outlined in the evidence statements for NGSS HS-PS3. We will explore how LOL diagrams enhance students’ sensemaking regarding energy, create models of energy flows in systems, and translate conceptual models into computational ones. This approach allows greater integration of the NGSS’s three dimensions as students and participants work to explicitly define systems, leading to greater transparency in students’ thought processes. Participants will engage in discussion with other examples and then work to apply these concepts to their own work.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how student sensemaking can be supported using LOL diagrams to provide a scaffold for creating a conceptual and computational model of energy flow in a system and collaborate in applying these concepts to their own disciplines.

SPEAKERS:
Sarah Evans (Olathe South High School: Olathe, KS), Matt Richard (Teacher: Olathe, KS)

Building Thinking Classrooms in Science

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 1501 B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Participants will engage in a thinking classroom for developing and using a constant velocity particle model by: • Observing a constant velocity toy car moving across the floor • Recording and summarizing their observations of the car • Developing a driving question board about their observations • Designing an experiment that could answer their question • Working in small groups to make sense of the model and apply it to a new situation using a thinking task • Discussing in a whole group a consensus model for any particle moving with a constant velocity • Examine the pedagogy that led to student thinking and sensemaking of the scientific model.

TAKEAWAYS:
Thinking classroom practices create the optimal conditions for learner-centered, student-owned science thinking and learning, and have the power to transform science classrooms.

SPEAKERS:
Earl Legleiter (Legleiter Science Consulting: Hays, KS)

Bridging Redox to ALL learners: Making Sense of Voltaic Cells with ELL in Mind

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 G



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA KC Bridging REDOX to ALL Learners with ELL in Mind

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The impact of battery operated cars have become a hot topic as energy alternatives are explored. Unfortunately, few students get exposed to the true nature of a Voltaic Cell and the vital workings of the transfer of chemical energy to electrical energy through oxidation-reduction reactions. After a junior high demo, Physical Science and Chemistry classes don't relate the function of metals in their tug-of-war with electrons within a Redox reaction. Working with an ELL Specialist, Science Specialists created a series of lessons that incorporate phenomenon, asking questions, creating an investigation, data analysis, justification of their data through science research and application to real world analogous phenomenon. These have been tried in Arkansas Physical Science and Chemistry classrooms. To improve the efficiency and effectiveness of batteries, the next generation must engage on the issue. The answers may come from the next William Kamkwamba not the AP Chem class.

TAKEAWAYS:
When life gives you lemons- make a battery! Educators will see an inclusive approach incorporating a demo to explore how a battery operates. It will relate the simple to the complex Redox reaction with supports and scaffolded instruction to best meet the needs of all learners.

SPEAKERS:
Susan Allison (Dawson Education Service Cooperative: Arkadelphia, AR)

Lab Activites for/with Pennies! Makings "Cents" of Science and Math

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2206



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTAKC Pennies 2023.pptx

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Using the often discarded coinage, attendees will use the penny, calculators, force sensors, graduated cylinders, and formulas to collect and analyze data. This data will be used to analyze density comparisons of pre- and post- 1982 pennies with scientific as well as mathematical tools. Attendees will also use force sensors to analyze mass and force data to find the acceleration due to gravity. Both activities use slope and graphing knowledge to ensure student success in the science and math classroom, as well as solidifying science skills needed for standardized testing.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn how to incorporate technology in the science classroom that will solidify concepts learned in the math classroom which directly apply to science.

SPEAKERS:
Chris Coker (Camden Fairview High School: Camden, AR)

Demystifying the Practice of Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking (Secondary)

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 C


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking is unfamiliar to many science educators because they didn’t engage in this practice in their own K-12 careers. Join us as we venture together into the unknown (unfamiliar) using grade-appropriate elements of Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking to build pieces of disciplinary core ideas and crosscutting concepts needed to explain a phenomenon (in part) and begin designing a solution to a problem. Participants will reflect on what Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking is all about and how this practice relates to the practices of Developing and Using Models and Analyzing and Interpreting Data.

TAKEAWAYS:
Engaging students in the practice of Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking can create and foster wider interests in STEM fields.

SPEAKERS:
Kate Soriano (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

DCI, CCC, and SEP's Oh My! Sweet and Salty Investigations with a 3-D twist!

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 G



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
DCI, CCC, and SEPs Oh My!.pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Visible three-dimensional learning classroom connections can be difficult to assess. In this session, participants will use real-world data collection to determine a phenomenon: why salt is added to freezing roads and when making homemade ice cream, but also is added to boiling water when making pasta. Participants will use the data collected to argue with evidence while creating a visible molecular-level diagram of what occurred. This model will be used to assess student learning of why those phenomena exist.

TAKEAWAYS:
How to use SEPs to drive student instruction and molecular-level modeling of processes using data to support claims.

SPEAKERS:
Jessica Kohout (Howard County Conservancy: Woodstock, MD), Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA)

Back to Top