2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

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FILTERS APPLIED:9 - 12, Hands-On Workshop, Tech Tools, Climate Science

 

Rooms and times subject to change.
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Polar Data Stories in High School Biology Classrooms

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Andy Kirk



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA Handout for Polar Data Stories In High School Biology Classrooms .docx
Handout from presentation
NSTA Polar Data Stories In High School Biology Classrooms_v2.pptx
Slides from the presentation
Polar Connections video

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Participants will engage with the Polar Data Stories collection of authentic data sets from polar scientists on phenomena such as how changing ocean currents affect penguin foraging in the Antarctic Peninsula and how climate change is affecting the forests in the Arctic. Through exploring two examples of data stories and engaging with both the student and educator-facing materials, participants will become familiar with the application of these data sets in high school biology and/or environmental science classes.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how to implement Polar Data Stories in their science classrooms where students use real science data to construct scientific explanations of polar phenomena.

SPEAKERS:
Julie Wood (The Young Womens Leadership School of Brooklyn)

Resources for Engaging in Climate Justice Centered Teaching and Learning Strand: Teaching strategies for classroom practice

Friday, October 27 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 D



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Session 6 Materials: Resources for Engaging in Climate Justice Centered Teaching

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Designers and writers from the well known STEM Teaching Tools collection (www.stemteachingtools.org), a free repository of resources that reference other national resources funded by the NSF and created by national leaders in climate science and education, have developed a branch of resources called the ClimateEdTools which provide learning pathways for educators as well as strategies for use in youth centered learning contexts. Come and explore these resources with us as we examine the deeply intersectional socio-ecological issues facing our world and how to teach about them. In this workshop we will explore how to engage in science instruction that centers local climate justice phenomena to teach climate science standards. In addition, we will workshop how educators may apply this collection of resources to meet the needs they have in their own teaching and learning contexts.

TAKEAWAYS:
Climate Ed Tools contain rich examples of climate justice instruction, strategies for engaging youth, and to support climate change learning and communication among educators. These open education resources (OER) include video overviews, valuable guidance educators, and tons of background resources!

SPEAKERS:
Philip Bell (University of Washington: Seattle, WA), Deb Morrison (University of Washington: No City, No State), Kelsie Fowler (University of Washington: Seattle, WA)

Teaching Science to Support Caring Ecological Relationships and Practices

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 D



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Session 7 Materials: Teaching Science to Support Caring Ecological Relationships

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Ecological systems have been damaged by humans. Science can be used to guide responses and support the thriving of species. Science education tends to reflect Western perspectives, including the view of humans as separate from and exerting control over nature. However, science learning can build from caring, relational orientations toward multispecies worlds and socio-ecologically just and thriving systems. We must engage learners in ways that highlight these webs of interdependence and support learners in responding to complex human-nature ecosystem dynamics. In this session, we will explore strategies and examples of science learning that cultivate caring ecological relationships, including firsthand experiences of learning by engaging with and investigating land and water systems. We will draw on co-designed resources from STEM Teaching Tools (www.stemteachingtools.org) and Learning in Places (learninginplaces.org) to support these experiences.

TAKEAWAYS:
Human-nature relationships are culturally and historically rooted and are embedded in approaches to science teaching and learning. Supporting reciprocal and caring human-nature relationships leads to socio-ecologically just and thriving systems—and aligns with NGSS 3-D learning.

SPEAKERS:
Philip Bell (University of Washington: Seattle, WA), Kelsie Fowler (University of Washington: Seattle, WA), Nancy Price (University of Washington: Seattle, WA)

Engaging in climate science education through connections to everyday life, equity, and justice

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 D


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Climate science education is foundational for all learners given our changing lands and waters. These changes vary across the landscape and thus we also need to learn about the differential way in which climate change is impacting people across different contexts. Often the most marginalized peoples are the first impacted. This session will explore ways to teach about climate science that provide insight into the lived experiences and current adaptations of those most impacted by climate change. Tools for engaging in conversations around such inequities, curriculum resources, and ways to engage in solutions centered action research with students will all be explored. We will draw on emerging resources being built within the STEM Teaching Tools collection (www.stemteachingtools.org), a free repository of resources that reference other national resources funded by the NSF and created by national leaders in climate science and education.

TAKEAWAYS:
Strategies for engaging in climate change and climate justice learning appropriate to grade band NGSS standards, climate and energy literacy standards, and for both school and community-based learning contexts.

SPEAKERS:
Philip Bell (University of Washington: Seattle, WA), Kelsie Fowler (University of Washington: Seattle, WA), Deb Morrison (University of Washington: No City, No State)

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