2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

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FILTERS APPLIED:6 - 8, Hands-On Workshop, Tech Tools, Earth

 

Rooms and times subject to change.
13 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Reaching Rural: Connecting NASA STEM to Rural Communities

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2104 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Connecting NASA STEM to Rural Communities.pptx

STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

The Smoky Mountains STEM Collaborative is a STEM learning ecosystem in rural western North Carolina and has been a NASA Science Activation partner since 2016. We have over a decade of combined experience in assisting educators in utilizing NASA resources through a local lens in their classroom and out-of-school-time programs. As a rural region, we are familiar with the difficulty that comes with reaching disenfranchised learners that may struggle with broadband access. Participants will be introduced to a number of resources and hands-on activities they can utilize in low or no-bandwidth areas, as well as partners they can collaborate with in order to broaden and deepen their impact in their classroom and community. We will conduct a few example activities tailored for middle school educators, with suggestions to be scalable for learners in high school, post-secondary, and informal settings.

TAKEAWAYS:
After engaging in some hands-on activities, attendees will leave with access to a digital library of resources as well as personal connections to bring NASA Science into their classrooms.

SPEAKERS:
Randi Neff (STEM Program Coordinator: Sylva, NC), Matthew Cass (Physics and Astronomy Instructor: Sylva, NC)

Extreme Living: Making Sense of Changing Weather Patterns and Designing Solutions

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

This presentation will provide teachers with a ready-to-teach Unit designed to help their students experience several Physical Science, Earth-Space Science, and Engineering NGSS standards. The unit addresses global weather patterns and the impacts of potential pattern changes. It also addresses thermal energy and its applications in building design. All middle school science teachers; whether new to the profession, new to phenomena-based learning, or seasoned veterans will find something new and exciting to bring back to their classrooms. This Unit combines my understanding of the middle school science classroom with expertise of curriculum writers at Pacific Education Institute. Teachers will receive help planning lessons, activities, and discussions. They will also take the role of a student to have first-hand experience with labs and activities. Teachers will receive a digital copy of all of the instructional materials including grading rubrics.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will learn how to teach and assess a dynamic 3-D unit addressing Physical Science and Earth Space Science NGSS Standards. Teachers will leave with editable access to all Unit materials. Teachers will get time and guidance on how to adapt the Unit to their classroom and student needs.

SPEAKERS:
Kat Chamberlain (Ridgetop Middle School: No City, No State)

Explore Solar System and Beyond: Bringing Solar Eclipse into the Classroom with the Solar Eclipse Toolkit

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2102 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NASA_NSTA_Eclipses_102023.pdf

STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Participants in this session will learn about NASA’s Heliophysics Big Year (Oct 23-Dec 24), including an annual eclipse, a total eclipse, and the culmination of the Parker Solar Probe Project. Learn the basic mechanics of how and why eclipses occur while engaging in low-cost and hands-on activities such as Sun Paper, UV Beads and Solar Radiation, and how to make a cereal box viewer. Attendees will enjoy engaging activities while learning about the next total solar eclipse on April 8, 2024. A total solar eclipse happens when the Moon passes between the Sun and Earth and completely blocks the face of the Sun. Those in the path of totality will experience a total eclipse and the sky will become very dark as if it were dawn or dusk. If the skies are clear, people can even see the Sun’s outer atmosphere, the corona, with their own eyes. Learn about these solar eclipses as well as NASA’s Solar Eclipse Toolkit, including lesson plans, activities, safety guides, videos, and so much more!

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn about the upcoming solar eclipse, explore resources within NASA STEM’s Solar Eclipse Toolkit, learn how to view the eclipse safely with their students, and walk away with standards-aligned hands-on activities that can be shared with students in both formal and informal settings.

SPEAKERS:
Dr. Sagirah Wheeler (NASA Education Specialist: No City, No State), Monica Uribe (NASA Education Specialist)

People and Wildlife: Lessons on Interconnections and Biodiversity

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2104 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The growth of human settlements and natural resource use have impacted our wild spaces and led to fragmented habitats, pollution, and overharvesting. In this hands-on session, the presenter will lead participants in hands-on classroom activities that explore ecological footprints and possible paths toward sustainability. The presenter will introduce concepts around human ecology, including human population trends, biodiversity trends, and how human activities (agricultural expansion, deforestation, etc.) have impacted wildlife habitats. Most of the session will be the demonstration of hands-on activities that address NGSS content, but also integrate mathematics, social studies, and language arts. Activity formats include a large-group simulation on carrying capacity in nature, a visual demonstration of the breakdown of land use around the globe, and a modeling activity on biodiversity threats in different ecosystems.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn hands-on, collaborative approaches to guide students’ inquiry around key ecological concepts on population, wildlife, and biodiversity, using 3-D strategies and sensemaking.

SPEAKERS:
Vanessa Wyss (Professor: Big Rapids, MI)

The Highs and Lows of the Weather - A Look Into Nor'easters and The Winter Bomb Cyclone

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2105


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The conceptual understanding of the interactions between Earth Systems, particularly the atmosphere and the hydrosphere, allows students to expand their knowledge further of concepts like weather, climate, and climate change. But research (Dove, 1999; Henriques, 2002; Phillips, 1991) shows that teachers and students have a poor understanding of basic weather-related concepts. In this workshop, teachers will be given a 5E lesson incorporating activities that will enable them to better integrate the phenomena of high and low-pressure systems (Disciplinary Core Idea ESS2D) into their curriculum. Besides the 5E lesson, participants will receive additional resources for implementing how these highs and lows interact during the winter to produce Nor'easters and Midwestern Winter Bomb systems. This workshop aims to better prepare those teaching about this important phenomenon in our nation's classrooms.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will be given a 5E lesson incorporating activities that will enable them to integrate better the phenomena of high- and low-pressure systems into their curriculum. Participants will also receive additional resources on incorporating winter weather systems in the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Dannah Schaffer (Minot State University: Minot, ND)

Get Ready for the April 8, 2024 Total Solar Eclipse

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 C



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
PPT for 3D astronomy workshop for KC - 9Oct2023.pdf
Solar Science - Activities to teach about lunar phases and eclispes.pdf
Solar Science and WTSGD Handout 2022 - 8Jun2022.pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The workshop will provide participants with the following information and learning experiences: 1.) Where and when the solar eclipse will be visible, including how to find what will specifically happen in their location. 2.) Three-Dimensional learning strategies to use with their students to understand what causes both lunar and solar eclipses, including what causes lunar phases and how knowing what causes lunar phases is key to knowing when eclipses occur. 3.) How to safely observe the eclipse using a variety of observing strategies. 4.) Suggestions for how to make the most of the eclipse as a school and/or community-wide event. 5.) What overall resources that NSTA has to help them make the most of this celestial event.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will come away with 3-D teaching strategies for students to understand the science behind eclipses, plus safe viewing strategies and ways to make the event a school-wide experience.

SPEAKERS:
Dennis Schatz (Institute for Learning Innovation: Beaverton, OR)

Preparing Your Students for the Upcoming Solar Eclipse in 2024

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2104 A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA 2023 fall Solar Eclipse Presentation 2.pptx
Looking to support the research being done by NASA/GLOBE on solar eclipses? This presentation will help you get started. The presentation contains numerous websites to help you teach about solar eclipses.
NSTA 2024 Solar Eclipse Resource Links.docx
This document provides you with website links from NASA, GLOBE and other organizations to help you teach about solar eclipses in your classroom.

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

More than 10,000 observers submitted data to GLOBE collecting more than 20,000 cloud observations with 60,000 photos and 80,000 air temperature measurements using the GLOBE Observer app during the Total Solar Eclipse on August 21st, 2017. The data was used by scientists around the world. Educators will learn how to upload data to GLOBE as citizen scientists in the GLOBE Observer App. The latest updates from NASA will be shared including these current sites on the solar eclipse. The NASA data provides teachers with lesson plans written in 5-E format and activities for students to do. Educators will receive a brief introduction on the protocols used. As a citizen scientist, educators can enter data without going through the GLOBE trainings. Examples of student research projects on the 2017 Solar Eclipse will illustrate the work that can be done by students. Supports NGSS Science and Engineering Practices and following NGSS standards: MS-ESS1-1 and HS-ESS1-1.

TAKEAWAYS:
Contribute to a citizen science database used by scientists to study the effects of eclipses on the atmosphere. Learn how to access NASA resources including teacher lesson plans to use in your classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Janet Struble (: Toledo, OH)

Making Meaningful Connections to Social Emotional Learning Alongside the NGSS

Friday, October 27 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2201


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Since the NGSS, science teachers have been increasingly considering how to effectively engage students during science lessons using science and engineering practices (SEPs). In order to engage in these practices deeply, students need to have effective social and emotional skills. Therefore, embedding social-emotional learning (SEL) can be a tool that teachers use to build a classroom community that deeply engages in the SEPs. This session will engage students in three science activities (one elementary, one middle school, and one high school) that promote 3D learning and SEL. For example, the high school activity will consist of us doing a simulation where participants will act as animals getting "food". We will use it to connect SEL to HS-LS2-8. We will then have participants reflect on SEL teaching strategies such as explicit/reflective SEL questions (Bahnson et al., 2020) in order to demonstrate how to meaningfully embed SEL into 3D NGSS lessons.

TAKEAWAYS:
You will learn strategies to teach SEL in existing NGSS lessons.

SPEAKERS:
Kathryn Borton (Science Teacher: Nevada, IA), Jesse Wilcox (University of Northern Iowa: Cedar Falls, IA)

Travelling back in time through Earth’s history with scientific ocean drilling

Friday, October 27 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2201



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
scientific-ocean-drilling-NSTA2023-KC.pdf

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

How do we know about mass-extinctions and meteor impacts? Using fossils to study past glacial periods? Shells, sand grains and even dust and volcanic ash from faraway lands fall slowly through the ocean and pile up on the seafloor, eventually becoming rocks. When we drill into the seafloor to collect layers of rocks (as cores), the deeper down we go, the further back in time we go. Scientists looking at these cores are effectively reading the pages in a book that reveals the Earth’s past, and sheds light on our future. This workshop will have teachers look at how using real scientific data collected onboard the JOIDES Resolution and other ships in the program, we can translate findings into data sets and activities to inspire students and help them see science in action. The focus will be on how data from oceanic drilling can be used to create activities using real-world phenomena that can connect to many scientific concepts, such as climate, natural hazards, and Earth’s systems.

TAKEAWAYS:
By looking into the past and present, we can begin to predict our future. The International Ocean Discovery Program creates educational resources that enable students to use real data collected by scientists investigating global concerns and explore parts of our world usually hidden to them.

SPEAKERS:
Maya Pincus (Columbia University / U.S. Science Support Program: Palisades, NY), Carol Cotterill (U.S. Science Support Program: Palisades, NY)

It’s All About Convection

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 A


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

In the presentation, I will be sharing activities for a 6-8 aligned unit on convection currents, as they are related to the layers of the earth, plate tectonics and weather. The activities the participants will experience will include hands-on activities using innovation, creativity, and technology. I will also provide links to activities/projects that participants can use that will not be demonstrated/experienced that will align the concepts of Earth Science.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will experience hands-on learning for grades 6-8 about convection, and how it relates to the layers of the Earth, tectonic plates, and weather.

SPEAKERS:
Amy Rush (Lufkin Middle School: Lufkin, TX), Rebecca Walker (Tays Junior High School: Katy, TX)

Building Insights Through Observation – Integrating Science and Art to Support Data Literacy

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 B


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Data is an increasingly prevalent resource for addressing real-world challenges, however, the transdisciplinary skills needed to interpret and think critically about data are lacking in the public. Geospatial data visualizations are tools used to transform large datasets into representations that support learning, but our understanding of how to effectively use them in instruction is under-studied. To support data literacy, a new model for teaching with data visualizations in middle school science uses arts-based instructional approaches including visual thinking skills that apply in both science and art. The model helps teachers develop greater comfort with data visualizations, understand arts-based pedagogies that support close observation and critical thinking, and integrate these approaches in their curricula, resulting in students’ data literacy skills gains. Workshop attendees will experience the program as students and reflect on how the approach supports teaching and learning.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will experience a new model for exploring geospatial data using arts-based instructional approaches for learning about earth science and learn how this transdisciplinary approach supports teachers and students in improving data literacy.

SPEAKERS:
Kathryn Semmens (Science Director: Easton, PA)

Once Upon an Earth Science Book: Real Science, Real Literacy Instruction

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 C


Show Details

The session will open with having participants work through pieces of Chapter 11 from Once Upon an Earth Science Book. Participants (as students) will collect information from three models: (the Coriolis effect, major ocean currents, and how wind creates currents). Then they will read an article on the Pacific Garbage Patch and how its existence was predicted based on such models before it was discovered. We will outline a writing assignment in which they predict where a boatload of rubber duckies that capsized off the coast of Morocco might end up. Next, we will discuss the "shape" of the lesson we just worked through, called a literacy learning cycle. From there, we will look at several specific difficulties that arise for students when they are asked to read and write (expectations, background knowledge, and meaningful writing). Finally, we will talk briefly about how the Once Upon a Science Book series can serve as a resource for literacy learning cycles.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will be introduced to the literacy learning cycle format, in which hands-on work precedes meaningful reading and writing activities. You will see how this system works by participating in a lesson and come away with practical strategies for your classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Jodi Wheeler-Toppen (Author/ Staff Development: Atlanta, GA)

Visualizing the Sun-Moon-Earth System

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2210


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Science teachers can use visual data strategies to help students come to understand what they are seeing, as well as pick out how those representations differ from reality. Strategies such as teacher modeling, questions, and small group work (McTigue & Coleman, 2013) help direct students’ attention to graphics and help them make sense of them. In this presentation, we will engage students in middle school space science lessons about eclipses, seasons, and moon phases (partially addressing MS-ESS1-1). We will use visual data throughout the 5E, along with teaching strategies, to show participants how we help our students move towards a more complete understanding of eclipses, seasons, and moon phases. We have found that by focusing on teaching students through and about visual data, they are better able to think critically about the content and the way the content is represented. We will discuss specific strategies on how to include visual data and how to help students make sense of that data.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will have examples and strategies to engage students with visual data.

SPEAKERS:
Jesse Wilcox (University of Northern Iowa: Cedar Falls, IA)

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