2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

All sessions added to My Agenda prior to this notice have been exported to the mobile app and will be visible in your account when the app launches. Any sessions added now, will also have to be added in the app.
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FILTERS APPLIED:9 - 12, Hands-On Workshop, Tech Tools, Engineering

 

Rooms and times subject to change.
11 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Space Telescopes: How they work, and how to simulate them in your classroom

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Julie Lee


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

An extension of our previous NASA/JWST ambassador and NSTA workshops, this session empowers educators with deeper understanding of orbiting observatories and provides an inherently engaging hands-on activity which works from pure STEM/STEAM fun to serious exploration of multi-wavelength astronomy. We provide gel filters that participants use with their phones to capture monochrome images at three wavelengths (630nm, 530nm & 470nm for red, green and blue). Participants then open their images in a free, browser-based image processing app to combine them into a "color" picture. This locks in an understanding of how "color" results from image processing. Then, participants choose NASA image files from an archive and repeat the process -- only now, they are assigning RG&B to wavelengths that are not actually visible to the eye. The tool we use includes both presets to make this fun as an introductory activity, and an array of math-driven functionality for deep dives into image processing.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will learn to process multi-wavelength image sets to create color images from space telescopes and your own devices. This leads to a deeper understanding of space-based astronomy and how space telescope images are made – and provides a classroom activity that is fun, rich, and economical.

SPEAKERS:
Donna Kaiser (Stamford High School: Stamford, CT), Vincent Urbanowski (Academy of Information Technology & Engineering: Stamford, CT)

Talk like your cell phone does (an inquiry lab)

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Jay McShann B


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Working in teams, students take a short analog message and convert it to binary code for cell phone transmission. Students then send those zero’s and one over a carrier wave using a form of amplitude modulation to another team. At the other end the message is decoded and rewritten in analog form. which message was first? How close was it? A discussion of challenges the students’ faced in acting like a DSP (digital signal processor) lets student see some of the challenges of the original binary code and how subsequent forms of coding came about to address some of those challenges. Students discover the binary code they used was Morse code. Students then code and send a different message using the original 5-digit computer code. After racing to send their messages, students are guided through a follow-up discussion on the pros and cons of the new (Baudot) computer code used.

TAKEAWAYS:
Students will understand some of the challenges faced in digital signal processing as sending digital information evolved by completing a lab activity where they will code and decode messages into a digital format for transmission and receiving, similar to how cell phones work.

SPEAKERS:
John Clark (Volusia Online Learning: Port Orange, FL)

Physics Through Flight

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Lester Young B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
National Free Flight Society Homepage
Presentation Slides
Science Olympiad Homepage
Science Olympiad Program Information

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Ever since the Wright Brothers first took flight in Kitty Hawk, the idea of powered flight has fascinated and captivated people. Unfortunately, despite flight's engaging nature and connections to fundamental physics concepts it is not a common topic in classrooms. Throughout our combined 97 years of existence our organizations, the National Free Flight Society and Science Olympiad, have been working to change this reality. In this session, we will introduce attendees to the idea of free flight model aircraft, demonstrate how these aircraft can be flown safely in schools, and share the variety of instructional resources that are immediately available for classroom use. Following this, we will identify ways attendees can take what they have learned and the activities available to enhance their classroom instruction. The session will close with a demonstration flight of a free flight model aircraft built from start to finish during this 60-minute session.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn the art of the possible when it comes to using flight as a topic to engage students in their study of forces, free body diagrams, and Newton's Laws.

SPEAKERS:
David Lindley (President: Lisle, IL), Julie Newman (Engineer), John Loehr (Science Olympiad: Oakbrook Terrace, IL)

Space-Based Observatories – Use Them Like an Astronomer

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Lester Young A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Presentational content will include a high level overview of NASA’s Great Observatories and other past and present orbiting telescopes, how their missions are coordinated, and how they work in concert to provide full spectrum data from across the sky in bands from gamma down to far infrared – almost all of which are invisible to the human eye. In the workshop portion, participants will access archived astronomical data from orbiting observatories using the same browser based tools used by astronomers. They will process their datasets using a variety of tools and techniques for reducing data, vetting objects, and generating results, such as Spectral Energy Distribution, Color-Color and Color-Magnitude plots. Teachers will bring this experience back to their classrooms adding depth of knowledge to astronomy content they may teach, as well as a deeper understanding of the conduct of science research.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn to access astronomical data such as monochrome images at various wavelengths and wavelength magnitude measurements for thousands of stars at a time just as professional astronomers do, and how to process such data for research using techniques of professional astronomy.

SPEAKERS:
Donna Kaiser (Stamford High School: Stamford, CT), Vincent Urbanowski (Academy of Information Technology & Engineering: Stamford, CT)

Vehicle Efficiency: An Engineering Design Challenge to Promote Equity in the Science Classroom

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Lester Young B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Vehicle Efficiency_ An EDC to Promote Equity in Science.pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Authentic engineering challenges are a highlight of my physics courses because of the increase in student engagement and depth of content understanding. I’ve also experienced the ways these design challenges level the playing field for all because problem solving and applying knowledge is valued. Yet, despite the many benefits of integrating engineering design in science classrooms, this component of the NGSS can easily be overlooked. In this workshop, participants immerse in the world of engineering design and optimization. Teacher teams will engage in a design task and subsequent design optimization. We’ll debrief strategies for incorporating engineering design activities into high school units and discuss techniques for implementation, while focusing on the engineering design cycle and the importance of optimization. Observations on how these design challenges invite all students into the discipline of physics will be shared. The takeaways are applicable to all science disciplines.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will take away a complete Engineering Design Challenge (EDC) that includes strategies for incorporating an EDC into an energy unit, highlighted disciplinary core ideas, templates for student analysis and reflection, and a three-dimensional assessment based on the EDC.

SPEAKERS:
Susan Swan (Vashon High School: Vashon, WA)

Session Name: Solids: Neglected State of Chemistry

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Colonial Ballroom



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Brassing a Penny Student Instructions
Presentation Slideshow
Test Tube Geology Lab Student Directions

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

various demonstrations will be used to continue to compare and contrast types of solids (materials) and their bonding and properties. For example, (through video) a ceramic alumina rod and metal aluminum rod will be heated to showcase differences in melting point, conductivity, and density. Teachers will also participate in an activity that precipitates copper crystals from copper sulfate. This particular activity mimics how native metals can crystallize in the earth crust naturally. In addition, teachers will participate in a lab that shows how metal atoms can easily be mixed to make an alloy. The concept of solid state diffusion will be discussed.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how to teach basic chemistry concepts using common everyday materials like metals, ceramics, glass, and polymers. Hands-on STEM activities, demonstrations, and labs will make learning these chemistry concepts more engaging and relevant.

SPEAKERS:
Gissel McDonald (Spring Hill High School: Spring Hill, KS), Sarah Ortiz (Teacher: Springfield, NE)

Engineering Design and Coding in the Chemistry Classroom?

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Big Joe Turner B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Engineering Design in the Chemistry Classroom.pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Adding engineering design and coding in the context of a core course like Chemistry may be difficult for teachers. This session will have participants collecting real world data, designing a solution to a real world problem, and adding a coding twist to that solution. Participants will either use a pH sensor or a temperature sensor to collect data, code a microcontroller to have an output of a fan or RGB LEDs, and play a sound. No coding or design experience necessary.

TAKEAWAYS:
Coding and engineering design in the Chemistry classroom based on real world data collection.

SPEAKERS:
Chris Coker (Camden Fairview High School: Camden, AR), Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA)

Metals: Digging Beneath the Surface

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2206



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Slideshow + Resources

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

In this workshop, participants will learn about the science behind metal properties through hands-on activities. They will create a simple low-melt alloy and generate a binary phase diagram. That phase diagram will be analyzed and lead to a discussion of melting points of alloys. Participants will explore the effects of heat and working on metal properties, and discover how to manipulate steel properties through annealing, quenching, and tempering. The steel samples include a high carbon and low carbon steel: bobby pin and paper clip. Participants will also compare the properties of copper wire to those of steel samples, gaining a deeper understanding of different metal behaviors."

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will explore how students can change metal properties through alloying, heat-treating, and cold-working. Classroom activities enhance understanding of both atomic structure of metals and real world engineering relevance.

SPEAKERS:
Sarah Ortiz (Teacher: Springfield, NE), Gissel McDonald (Spring Hill High School: Spring Hill, KS)

Engineering Connects Classrooms to STEM Careers

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 C


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Looking for ways to integrate engineering in your science curriculum? Join us to become familiar with freely-available, high-quality instructional materials that create opportunities for students to apply science ideas to solve real-world problems, gain confidence and see themselves in STEM careers.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn how to engage students in learning that centers on addressing pressing social challenges and be able to describe transdisciplinary approaches to education.

SPEAKERS:
Rob Wallace (: Kenner, LA)

Redox: The Applications of Corrosion Chemistry

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2502 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Slideshow + Resources

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

This presentation will cover the simple principles of redox reactions and corrosion chemistry. Attendees will learn about the transfer of electrons between species, how to write equations for oxidation and reduction, and the factors that affect the rate of corrosion. The presentation will also explore the properties of metals such as zinc and aluminum and their usefulness in various applications. Practical applications of redox reactions and corrosion chemistry will be discussed, including galvanization and reduction of metal ores. Hands-on activities and audience participation will be encouraged throughout the presentation. By the end, attendees will have a solid understanding of the chemistry behind redox reactions and corrosion and how this knowledge can be applied in real-world situations.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn hands-on labs, activities, and demos that can be used to teach about corrosion. A look at corrosion will lead to a discussion of how to teach redox principles in a simple way in the classroom. Examples of redox in action in the real world will make this relevant to students.

SPEAKERS:
Sarah Ortiz (Teacher: Springfield, NE), Gissel McDonald (Spring Hill High School: Spring Hill, KS)

Integrating Nature-Inspired Invention and Engineering into the Biology Classroom through Case-Based Learning

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 F


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Case, project-based, and invention education lessons for high school students provide context for the learner through real-world scenarios that engage students in inventing while teaching NGSS cross-cutting concepts, scientific processes, engineering, and design. Participants in this workshop will learn how to engage students in nature-inspired invention, engineering, and intellectual property protection through a transdisciplinary lesson about the invention of Velcro. Biological systems and evolutionary adaptations inspire innovations and inventions that spark inventors to solve complex human problems. Participants will learn how to engage their students in creating nature-inspired inventions using resources provided by the US Patent and Trademark Office.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn how to integrate engineering design with biological concepts through nature-inspired invention and transdisciplinary learning by implementing case, project-based, and invention education.

SPEAKERS:
Jorge Valdes (U.S. Patent and Trademark Office: Alexandria, VA), Reginald Duncan (U.S. Patent and Trademark Office: Alexandria, VA), Kathy Hoppe (STEMisED, Inc: No City, No State)

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