2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

All sessions added to My Agenda prior to this notice have been exported to the mobile app and will be visible in your account when the app launches. Any sessions added now, will also have to be added in the app.
Grade Level


Topics
























Strands











Session Type














Pathway/Course














FILTERS APPLIED:Hands-On Workshop, Tech Tools, Life Science

 

Rooms and times subject to change.
22 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

How to Promote and Support Learning After Introducing a Phenomenon

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The session will give teachers an opportunity to participate in the same sort of rich and meaningful learning experiences that are called for by the NGSS. This session, as a result, will include approximately forty minutes of audience participation in student hat. Teachers will leave with high-quality instructional materials that they can use in their own classrooms. The agenda for this session is: • A discussion of characteristics of phenomenon-based instruction and sensemaking (5 mins). • A discussion of obstacles to sensemaking during a learning experience (10 minutes). • An opportunity for participants to experience an example of how support learners use DCIs, CCs, and SEPs during a learning experience in a way that makes the process of sensemaking useful and inclusive (40 mins). • Questions and suggestions for learning more (5 mins).

TAKEAWAYS:
Introducing meaningful phenomena is necessary, but not sufficient for fostering sensemaking. Students must also have opportunities to use DCIs, CCs, and SEPs during the learning experience, and the experience must be structured in ways that make the process of sensemaking useful and inclusive.

SPEAKERS:
Victor Sampson (The University of Texas at Austin: Austin, TX)

People and Wildlife: Lessons on Interconnections and Biodiversity

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2104 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The growth of human settlements and natural resource use have impacted our wild spaces and led to fragmented habitats, pollution, and overharvesting. In this hands-on session, the presenter will lead participants in hands-on classroom activities that explore ecological footprints and possible paths toward sustainability. The presenter will introduce concepts around human ecology, including human population trends, biodiversity trends, and how human activities (agricultural expansion, deforestation, etc.) have impacted wildlife habitats. Most of the session will be the demonstration of hands-on activities that address NGSS content, but also integrate mathematics, social studies, and language arts. Activity formats include a large-group simulation on carrying capacity in nature, a visual demonstration of the breakdown of land use around the globe, and a modeling activity on biodiversity threats in different ecosystems.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn hands-on, collaborative approaches to guide students’ inquiry around key ecological concepts on population, wildlife, and biodiversity, using 3-D strategies and sensemaking.

SPEAKERS:
Vanessa Wyss (Professor: Big Rapids, MI)

STOM: Animals on the Move

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 G



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Animals on the Move NSTA-KC2023
Presentation with links to resources and videos
Animals on the Move Resource Links
Animals on the Move Slides Presentation

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Animal movement patterns are phenomena that students can make sense of and explain. A variety of animal movement data sources will be shared with participants, along with strategies for assisting students in data organization and interpretation. During the presentation, participants will engage as students exploring data to answer questions about specific animal movements. Since this is an elementary session, there will be connections made to trade books and disciplinary text, as well as connections to math and geography standards with an emphasis on integration of disciplines that will assist students in making sense of problems and phenomena of animal movement. Examples of data sources include: Movebank, eBird, Journey North, Department of Fish and Wildlife, Tagging of Pelagic Predators, etc.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how to access data related to animal movement and migration, along with strategies that enable students to make sense of that data in explaining phenomena.

SPEAKERS:
Elizabeth (Betsy) O'Day (Retired Educator: Kansas City, MO)

Infographics: Increasing Visual Literacy

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Infographics: Improving Visual Literacy Participant Handout
This link provides access to this session's participant handout.
Infographics: Improving Visual Literacy Presentation Slides
This link is for access to the presentation slide deck.

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Students today are exposed to an information-rich environment that is inundated with visual images. Likewise, science relies heavily on the use of visuals to present technical information. Instructional strategies will be shared that use infographics to engage students with the science and engineering practices to make sense of complex information quickly and clearly. Participants will experience a “think-aloud” to extrapolate information from an infographic and work through an evaluation tool to determine its scientific credibility. In addition, they will learn ways to incorporate infographics to spark debate, construct a scientific argument using the claim-evidence-reasoning framework, and complete a problem analysis to find a solution to an everyday problem. Finally, resources will be shared in how to develop student-created infographics.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn instructional strategies to support student sensemaking through the use of visually-rich infographics. This includes using science and engineering practices to analyze and interpret data, construct explanations, and engage in argument from evidence in secondary classrooms.

SPEAKERS:
Tina Hovance (Katy ISD: Katy, TX)

Polar Data Stories in High School Biology Classrooms

Thursday, October 26 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

Kansas City Marriott Downtown - Andy Kirk



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA Handout for Polar Data Stories In High School Biology Classrooms .docx
Handout from presentation
NSTA Polar Data Stories In High School Biology Classrooms_v2.pptx
Slides from the presentation
Polar Connections video

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Participants will engage with the Polar Data Stories collection of authentic data sets from polar scientists on phenomena such as how changing ocean currents affect penguin foraging in the Antarctic Peninsula and how climate change is affecting the forests in the Arctic. Through exploring two examples of data stories and engaging with both the student and educator-facing materials, participants will become familiar with the application of these data sets in high school biology and/or environmental science classes.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how to implement Polar Data Stories in their science classrooms where students use real science data to construct scientific explanations of polar phenomena.

SPEAKERS:
Julie Wood (The Young Womens Leadership School of Brooklyn)

Use NSTA resources to integrate science, computer science, and Artificial Intelligence in the science classroom

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 C



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Slides - Using NSTA resources to integrate CS, AI and Science in your classroom

STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Learn about free NSTA resources that support integrating learning in Life Science, Computer Science, and Artificial Intelligence. Experience programming your own Artificial Intelligence device on your laptop. Discover the free professional learning available to support implementing the lessons.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn code to program a simple dialogue with an AI Device. Discover how NSTAs free lessons authentically integrate Life Science, Computer Science, and AI. Learn about free professional learning that supports the lesson materials.

SPEAKERS:
Rob Wallace (NSTA: Kenner, LA), Michelle Phillips (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Exploring Symbiosis: Parasitoid Wasps

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2102 B


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Symbiosis and Other Relationships is a multimedia curriculum module that uses a three-part symbiosis between a wasp, its caterpillar host, and a virus to highlight the varied and sometimes complex ecological relationships. It includes an opportunity for students to analyze data through a simulated experiment, interweaving this example with more general information. Students learn about competition, predation, parasitism, commensalism, and mutualism through examples of 2-way relationships, and tease out the types of relationships at play in examples of 3-way relationships. The module’s materials can be used independently to supplement existing curriculum materials, or used alone in a suggested sequence over 1-2 weeks of class time. Workshop Outcomes • Where to access a free NGSS-friendly, multimedia middle school curriculum module on ecological relationships. • Teasing apart 2-way and 3-way ecological relationships reveals a number of strategies organisms employ to survive.

TAKEAWAYS:
How to access and use a free module that includes an opportunity for students to analyze data through a simulated experiment involving the wasp parasitoid and its host, interweaving this example with more general information in a way that builds an understanding of complex ecological relationships.

SPEAKERS:
Molly Malone (The University of Utah: Salt Lake City, UT)

Using the SEP’s in a Science Investigation for Exploring Diversity Equity and Inclusion

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2206


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

During this workshop small group work with pill bugs set the stage for exploring the SEP’s through a discovery-based investigation. An anonymous poll will be taken at the beginning of the workshop to identify JEDI (justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion) hurdles teachers are facing. During the investigation, technology and non-technology based methods will be explored. After the investigation, participants will share in a facilitated discussion on modes of dismantling barriers. Review handouts of SEP’s & CCC’s identified and applied during the investigation will compliment elementary level DCI’s. Discussion will drive beyond just the facts of finding an answer to the investigation question, but to take an examination into knowledge of helping illustrate how the SEP’s and CCC’s can serve as an entry point at the elementary level to build science literacy and help move us beyond just facts but deepen our understanding and discovery of the world around us.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers struggle with access and affordability when designing discovery-based investigations. With minimal to no cost, this ready-to-use complete elementary LS investigation will demonstrate ways to increase equity in science sensemaking practices through standards-based hands-on investigations.

SPEAKERS:
Kim Burnett (American University: Washington, DC), Ollie Bogdon (Missouri Western State University: Saint Joseph, MO)

Facilitate the "What is Sensemaking?" Discussion for your Team!

Friday, October 27 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 C



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
What is Sensemkaing KC23.pptx

STRAND: Teaching Strategies and Classroom Practice

Show Details

NA

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will build an understanding of sensemaking and receive a toolkit to lead the session with other educators.

SPEAKERS:
Tricia Shelton (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

What is Hydroponics?

Friday, October 27 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2209


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

This session will engage attendees in answering the core question, "What is hydroponics?" After viewing phenomena-based video shorts and images of plants growing both in soil and hydroponically, attendees will work in small groups to model the phenomena, compare and contrast similarities and differences, and ultimately answer the questions: 1) What do plants need to grow? 2) How do plants grow through hydroponic farming? This workshop and corresponding lesson aligns with the NGS standards of MS-LS1-1, MS-LS1-3, MS-LS1-8, MS-LS2-1, & MS-LS2-3.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will be able to compare and contrast the similarities and differences between growing food through hydroponic farming versus growing food in the soil. They will be able to explain how plants grow through hydroponic farming.

SPEAKERS:
Dr. Kim Smith Kolasa (Partnership Development Director)

Ways to Structure Student Discussions to Increase Participation and Collaborative Sensemaking

Friday, October 27 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2210


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

The session will give teachers an opportunity to participate in the same sort of rich and meaningful learning experiences that are called for by the NGSS. This session, as a result, will include approximately forty minutes of audience participation in student hat. Teachers will leave with high-quality instructional materials that they can use in their own classrooms. The agenda for this session is: • A discussion of characteristics of collaborative sensemaking and productive discussions (5 mins). • A discussion of some of the challenges with promoting and supporting productive discussions where all students participate during a learning experience (10 minutes). • An opportunity for participants to experience an example of productive small group discussion that fosters collaborative sense-making (20 mins). • An opportunity for participants to experience an example of productive whole class discussion (20 mins). • Questions and suggestions for learning more (5 mins).

TAKEAWAYS:
Collaborative sensemaking requires productive and inclusive talk. Teachers can foster productive talk between students using specific activity structures, talk prompts, talk moves, and supports.

SPEAKERS:
Victor Sampson (The University of Texas at Austin: Austin, TX)

Hooked on Earthworms: High-Interest Activities to Drive Sensemaking

Friday, October 27 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 A


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

First, participants will learn how to keep a worm safe and comfortable for handling. Then we will examine external structure, function, senses, and talk about how those connect to a worm's life style. We will even use flashlights to peek inside the worm to see their digestive system. Each activity will be tied to elementary NGSS on organisms, systems, environment, structure and function, and life cycles. The activities will come from my picture book, This is a Book to Read with a Worm (winner of the AAAS/Subaru Excellence in Science Books, 2020), but I will not promote the book. I just want to share the activities.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will experience a series of activities that will help them use earthworms as phenomena in elementary science. For each activity, we will discuss how to move from the specifics of worms into sensemaking on more general concepts that the worms illustrate.

SPEAKERS:
Jodi Wheeler-Toppen (Author/ Staff Development: Atlanta, GA)

Using ChatGPT To Your Advantage in Your Junior High/Middle School Science Class

Friday, October 27 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2203



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1mCHvN2ZIcyGL2RZOIHb1qsQ4bR--HnLv?usp=sharing
Presentation

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

By utilizing ChatGPT, start-ups can provide students with a starting point for research by offering them foundational knowledge on a variety of subjects. The use of superheroes to teach the periodic table, for example, could provide students with a fun and engaging way to learn about chemistry. Similarly, focusing on environmental concerns such as ocean acidification can help students understand the importance of conservation and sustainability. Additionally, warm-up activities can be an effective way to build relationships and foster collaboration between students. Whether it be through icebreakers or team-building exercises, getting to know one another can help students work together more effectively and create a more positive learning environment. Overall, utilizing ChatGPT can be an effective way for teachers to create engaging and informative content for students. By providing them with a foundation of knowledge, start-ups can empower students to take control of their own learning.

TAKEAWAYS:
One takeaway from this session is that you will understand that ChatGPT is a powerful tool for teachers. This application will allow you to answer questions or ideas you have and improve research activities that might be difficult for students.

SPEAKERS:
Ricardo Padilla (Brookhurst Jr HIgh School)

Scaffolding Learning to Engage Diverse Learners in Informational Science Text

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2215 B


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

During this workshop we will present and engage participants in literacy and math-based strategies supported by research that science, mathematics, English language arts, and special education middle school teachers can use scaffold learning to engage in informational science text and argumentation connected to life sciences (e.g., vaping) for diverse learners in their classrooms. By the end of the workshop participants will be able to: 1. Define content and instructional scaffolding and how these types of scaffolds can be used to structure learning experiences to engage diverse learners in making meaningful sense of informational text. 2. Identify literacy- and math-based strategies that connect to content and instructional scaffolds that are designed to structure meaningful learning experiences to engage diverse learners in informational text. 3. Implement strategies within their content instruction that will scaffold learning to engage their diverse learners in informational text.

TAKEAWAYS:
All learners, including diverse learners, with the right instructional scaffolds can meaningfully engage in complex informational science text.

SPEAKERS:
TARA GREEN (student: , MO), William Folk (University of Missouri: Columbia, MO), Amy Lannin (University of Missouri: Columbia, MO), Cassandra Smith (University of Missouri: Columbia, MO), Delinda Van Garderen (University of Missouri: Columbia, MO)

All Systems Go: The Human Body as a System

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2214


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Learning science can sometimes focus on concepts often challenging to engage in due to the scale of being too small to be seen or too large to comprehend. This NGSS-designed unit offers tools to engage ALL students and connect micro and macro concepts around systems to develop concrete understandings. This 20+ lesson unit is driven by phenomena guiding students toward the concept of a “system,” from the cell level to a global level. Students explore the system at a cellular level through real-world connections and then build models of interacting subsystems. The disruptions of these systems are experienced through the examination of a viral illness and its effect on human systems. Students engage in argument with evidence to support a claim of the interdependence of systems. This concept is then applied to Earth systems and how disruption in a part of an Earth system affects the whole. Participants experience this unit through a 5E format and leave with the unit and resources.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will construct an explanation for how parts of a system are interdependent both at the micro level and the macro level.

SPEAKERS:
Julia Smith (Riverside Unified School District: Riverside, CA), Heather McDonald (Riverside Unified School District: Riverside, CA)

Demystifying the Practice of Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking (Elementary)

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 C


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking is unfamiliar to many science educators because they didn’t engage in this practice in their own K-12 careers. Join us as we venture together into the unknown (unfamiliar) using grade-appropriate elements of Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking to build pieces of disciplinary core ideas and crosscutting concepts needed to explain an everyday phenomenon elementary students find curious and puzzling. Participants will reflect on what Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking is all about and how this practice relates to the practices of Developing and Using Models and Analyzing and Interpreting Data.

TAKEAWAYS:
Elementary students engage in Using Mathematics and Computational thinking everyday as they describe, make comparisons between, and test predictions about systems in the world.

SPEAKERS:
Kate Soriano (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Let's Talk ELL: Strategic Language Development in the Science Classroom

Saturday, October 28 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2206


Show Details

Due to the high influx of ELL students we have on our campus, we have come up with different systems and programs used in our classrooms, and our strategic after school tutoring for ELL students. Not only are students not able to speak the language, but come to us with large gaps in their education. The strategies created address both content and academic vocabulary. It has been shown ELL students are able to understand content language, but struggle with academic language. Hands on activities will be demonstrated using images to help students obtain language proficiency for both content and academic language. These strategies have been used the past two years, and have increased ELL test passing percentage by 40%.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will be able to take the strategies modeled during this workshop and incorporate them into their lessons or tutoring sessions. Written handouts will accompany the modeling of the strategies during this workshop.

SPEAKERS:
Briana Harry (Skyline High School: No City, No State)

Teaching Biological Macromolecular Structure and Chemical Bonds using Computer Models

Saturday, October 28 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2214


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Protein visualization using computer modeling software is a powerful educational tool to illustrate and explore the connection between protein structure, function, chemistry, and biology. However, using these tools in the classroom requires prerequisite knowledge of macromolecules, small molecules, chemical bonds, and in some cases the use of the tools themselves. This workshop will demonstrate resources that can be used to illustrate chemical bonds, polypeptide structure, drug interactions and other resources to teach protein structure and function at the introductory biology level. The worksheets will introduce and explore real-world examples. Resources are adaptable and stem from more detailed teaching resources that direct students to explore the science of protein structure visualization, disease and treatments. The approaches use freely available materials and internet resources.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn about approaches and resources for integrating 3-D protein visualization into introductory biology courses at multiple topics – including polypeptide structure, membrane orientation, and inhibitor binding. Teaching materials are available for multiple levels of integration.

SPEAKERS:
Keith Johnson (Bradley University: Peoria, IL)

Enhancing Science Notebooks with Scientific Sketching and Nature Journaling

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2214



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Enhancing Science Notebooks with Nature Journaling

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Attendees will learn techniques and strategies for incorporating scientific sketching and nature journaling into students’ science notebook routines by engaging in the activities themselves. Materials and natural physical specimens will be provided for journaling and sketching activities. Student examples and free resources will be shared. This workshop is appropriate for all K-12 teachers and informal science educators.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will be introduced to, and participate in, several nature journaling activities from the free John Muir Laws "How to Teach Nature Journaling" book, as well as receive some scientific sketching guidance from the California Academy of Sciences. Special attention to integrating math will be included.

SPEAKERS:
Dana Atwood-Blaine (University of Northern Iowa: Cedar Falls, IA)

Ecology and Ethology in the Schoolyard: Students Conduct Original Field Studies

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2105



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Abstract, Note to participants, references
Across front m the conference
Slide presentation (background and agenda)

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

A seventh grader writes: “I have learned about watching my surroundings and how every part of the school has an ecosystem that stretches far beyond most people’s understanding.” Searching, finding, observing, and describing living things in students' environment connects them with their place. Questions worth investigating arise with ease and abundance. Developing and implementing systematic protocols help students reach more deeply into ecological phenomena. Animal behavior observed “in the wild” fosters natural engagement. Students’ questions and focused inquiries can lead to original insights that strengthen a sense of place. In this workshop, we will try our hand at the initial stages of a focused field study; perhaps tracking the behavior of urban birds, surveying the diversity of urban spiders, or mapping the travel of urban ants. The goal will be for teachers to relate the workshop experience to the potential of their own schoolyards for study. Samples of student work will inspire.

TAKEAWAYS:
The local environment of the schoolyard and neighborhood offers great potential for students to practice authentic and original field science.

SPEAKERS:
Richard Frazier (retired)

Can You Grow Food in a Bottle? Abiotic & Biotic Interactions in Food Ecosystems

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Session ID #39625 Sense Making Strand Can You Grow Food in a Bottle?
Can You Grow Food in a Bottle? Abiotic & Biotic Interactions in Food Ecosystems. Sure!! Using alternative food systems to understand the abiotic and biotic interactions.

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Session participants explore matter-energy ecosystem transfer phenomena by modeling alternative food production & creating design plans/systems to grow food with minimal materials. The phenomena of energy & matter transfers is abstract; yet, as part of ecosystem services, provides for many student-led investigations and design solutions to improve life, such as food production. In MS LS2-3, students develop a model to describe the cycling of matter and flow of energy among living and nonliving parts of an ecosystem. If we take this a step further, students would create functional models of alternative food growth while demonstrating minimal to no impact on the ecosystem. Session participants will explore the idea of alternative food production and create design plans (and possible functioning systems) to grow food with minimal materials. The intent is to provide session participants with realistic, functional modeling to increase student understanding & ability to synthesize the content.

TAKEAWAYS:
The energy-matter transfer phenomena is crucial in ecosystems. Creating functional ecosystem models leads to understanding ecosystem interactions and services such as food production. We can mimic nature to provide sustainable food supplies with less impact to natural environments.

SPEAKERS:
Sue Meggers (Interstate 35 Community School District: Truro, IA)

Go Hybrid! Bridge digital and analog teaching and learning to improve student engagment and learning

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2504 A


STRAND: Tech Tools

Show Details

Since returning from COVID classrooms have become increasingly digitally based, but has this been beneficial for students? After reflecting on our own teaching practices & examining our students’ progress we concluded that a fully digital classroom is limiting our students' linguistic and academic growth which can really hurt our English Learners. We examined available research on technology use in the class & how the implementation had impacted students. In addition, we looked at current best practices for literacy & academic language acquisition as it pertains to our ELLs. We began to look for ways to hybridize assignments to encourage substantive conversations, collaboration & engagement. Early results point to students’ better use of academic language, higher engagement & increased test scores. Participants will learn by doing a hybrid assignment & compare them to the results of our digital only & analog only assignments. We will provide scaffolds to build your own hybrid lessons.

TAKEAWAYS:
Particpants will walk away with outlines and skeletons on builidng hybridized digital and analog lessons.

SPEAKERS:
Heather Berlin (Truman High School: Independence, MO), Jennifer Tuff (North Side High School: Fort Worth, TX)

Back to Top