2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

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Rooms and times subject to change.
6 results
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Inquiry-Based Elementary Lessons About Climate Change by SubjectToClimate

Friday, October 27 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Climate Change Lessons for Teachers K-2
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1ePS4jGp7n5gyJCrYDkY5hesCWVjyc8lW/view?usp=drive_link

STRAND: Tech Tools

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SubjectToClimate's free online resources provide inquiry-based, interdisciplinary elementary lessons about climate change. These lessons follow an inquiry-based framework that enables students to practice NGSS K-2 learning outcomes, such as observing patterns in the natural world to explain natural phenomena, and using evidence to construct explanations. Through the use of engaging activities and real-world examples, these lessons help students to develop a deeper understanding of climate change and its impact on the environment. The interdisciplinary approach encourages the integration of science, math, and literacy, making these resources a valuable tool for educators looking to incorporate climate change education into their curriculum. The poster session will highlight the key features of the resources and provide examples of how they have been implemented in classrooms.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how they can incorporate climate change into elementary-level science curriculum using NGSS, while learning about SubjectToClimate’s free platform that offers teaching resources, lessons by teachers, and much more.

SPEAKERS:
Elaine Makarevich (SubjectToClimate: No City, No State)

AI or Oh My? A ChatGPT workshop that's not artificial!

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2201


STRAND: Tech Tools

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The NGSS emphasizes practices including: 1) analyzing/interpreting data, 2) constructing explanations, and 3) obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information. Passive learning will not help middle school students practice these skills. But by giving students agency, ChatGPT, and proper scaffolding, teachers can incorporate such practices. This workshop will support teachers as they navigate through a scaffolded learning experience with ChatGPT. Attendees will discover that ChatGPT can be used to offload lower-level thinking skills and advance students into higher order thinking. For example, MS-PS1-3 reads: Gather and make sense of information to describe that synthetic materials come from natural resources and impact society. Students could use ChatGPT to gather the information and then analyze, evaluate, and construct explanations to make sense of the information. After one hour, attendees will have developed an NGSS-aligned activity using ChatGPT that they can confidently use!

TAKEAWAYS:
To be successful with ChatGPT in the science classroom, we need to give students agency. In this workshop, attendees will control their learning. They will develop a valuable idea for using ChatGPT in their class AND witness a fully different way of managing their class…by giving students agency.

SPEAKERS:
Walter Ryan (Retired Educator), Chris Turner (Chief of Staff: Rockaway, NJ), Denise Bressler (Chief Ideologist: Liberty Corner, NJ)

Civic Online Reasoning in Science

Saturday, October 28 • 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Aisle


STRAND: Tech Tools

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Even prior to the adoption of Illinois' media literacy requirement, Stanford University had researched student search patterns and developed a curriculum for teachers/specialists to educate students on evaluating online sources. I am a biology teacher who worked on a teacher-led team for 3-years with Stanford to implement a cross-curricular Civic Online Reasoning experience for all freshmen. Our program was highlighted in Chicagoland All Things Considered (NPR) and Scripps National News Literacy Week. Focus will be on why students need explicit experiences, three online focuses, and designing lessons for immediate use. https://cor.stanford.edu/curriculum/ https://docs.google.com/document/d/1t_mVir5PHvfnOKgzm48HCqDPxilpeKwnZ1qf_7CSnek/edit?usp=sharing

TAKEAWAYS:
Science teachers can take the front seat in teaching students best practices in online searches with mini-lessons embedded in science content.

SPEAKERS:
Adrianne Toomey (Neuqua Valley High School: Naperville, IL)

Go Hybrid! Bridge digital and analog teaching and learning to improve student engagment and learning

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2504 A


STRAND: Tech Tools

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Since returning from COVID classrooms have become increasingly digitally based, but has this been beneficial for students? After reflecting on our own teaching practices & examining our students’ progress we concluded that a fully digital classroom is limiting our students' linguistic and academic growth which can really hurt our English Learners. We examined available research on technology use in the class & how the implementation had impacted students. In addition, we looked at current best practices for literacy & academic language acquisition as it pertains to our ELLs. We began to look for ways to hybridize assignments to encourage substantive conversations, collaboration & engagement. Early results point to students’ better use of academic language, higher engagement & increased test scores. Participants will learn by doing a hybrid assignment & compare them to the results of our digital only & analog only assignments. We will provide scaffolds to build your own hybrid lessons.

TAKEAWAYS:
Particpants will walk away with outlines and skeletons on builidng hybridized digital and analog lessons.

SPEAKERS:
Heather Berlin (Truman High School: Independence, MO), Jennifer Tuff (North Side High School: Fort Worth, TX)

Make Your Graph Tell Your Story

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 F


STRAND: Tech Tools

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Students often have ok data but present it graphically not in the best way. Let’s talk about how to make your graph tell your story. Simple stuff like: which type of graph? What variable, where does it go, scale, function or not? Stuff beyond the basics: Which graph is the best type of graph for your data, hypothesis and story? How can I effectively improve my graph to better communicate my results? Does my graph limit the credibility of my work?

TAKEAWAYS:
Effective graphing can be a tool to visually show relationships.

SPEAKERS:
Louise Chapman (Volusia County Schools: Deland, FL), Jacklyn Bonneau (Massachusetts Academy of Math & Science at WPI: Worcester, MA)

Computational Thinking Guided by Artificial Intelligence

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2204



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Platform to create with guidance from AI
Video demo of the platform
Learn to create and think like a computer scientist, guided with real-time feedback from artificial intelligence.

STRAND: Tech Tools

Show Details

Although most people do not know a programming language, nearly everyone can read and write. The exposition of plain English text forms a critical part of logically explaining a set of operations and instructions, which are foundational to computational thinking and coding. The learning of programming concepts, such as cause-and-effect, abstraction, logical reasoning, etc., will be explored through each example exercise during the session. We will write a number of games together, guided by artificial intelligence, where each can be completed in just 10 minutes or less! The platform will automatically convert the text into a playable game. Games are engaging learning tools and are perfect for teaching many subject areas. The session will be divided as follows: 1. How to describe a game in English via Setting and Plot. 2. Basic game construct. 3. Pong-like games. 4. Space Invaders. 5. Mario-like games. 6. More complex variables/attributes. 7. Debugging. 8. Sharing games. 9. How to use Online Tutorials.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn to: clearly articulate programming concepts, think like a programmer, relate various aspects of each sentence to computational concepts and constructs, apply lessons to various subjects.

SPEAKERS:
Michael Hsiao (Virginia Tech: Blacksburg, VA)

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