2023 Kansas City National Conference

October 25-28, 2023

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Rooms and times subject to change.
18 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Speaking Like a Scientist Leads to Reading and Writing Like a Scientist!

Thursday, October 26 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2209


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

It's difficult for educators at the primary level to imagine creating “additional time” for science, but when we understand strong language skills provide greater success in reading and writing, we see that science isn't just "one more thing." Science and critical thinking creates opportunities for students to have authentic conversations–which allows us to guide student language in a way that's unmatched! We will include a brief review of SEPs, standards for spoken/written language, and examples for using NGSS DCIs to facilitate student conversations. Ideas for explicitly teaching conversational language skills and behaviors will be shared. Participants will learn ways to combine the use of guided student language and current best practices in literacy instruction along with other ideas that can be used immediately. The session will end with participants developing plans for scientific conversations in their own classrooms, and ideas for how they might guide & build student language.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will be provided with ideas for engaging students in scientific conversations, ideas for guiding student language within those conversations, and ideas for using language to facilitate literacy instruction.

SPEAKERS:
Paige Garrett (Teacher: Nixa, MO), Courtney Mills (John Thomas School of Discovery Partner School: Nixa, MO), Shannon Winkler (John Thomas School of Discovery Partner School: Nixa, MO)

Moonflower Magic: Inclusive Argumentation in the Elementary Classroom

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2210


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Participants will discover how argumentation can support the vision of inclusive instructional strategies across the curriculum. This session will anchor in learning theory and focus on student work examples, including graphic organizers and transcripts, that tell the story of an instructional sequence about pollinators. How the routines of science support learning for literacy and math will be investigated and made explicit. We’ll pull apart the underlying instructional practices evident in the student work for how to plan for engagement, elicit student ideas, support changes in student ideas, and press for complete explanations through argumentation.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will come away with an example of how to structure argumentation in the 4th grade classroom through observing student data organization and student discourse.

SPEAKERS:
Lindsey Roy (Science and Digital Learning Coordinator: Lincoln, NE), Miranda Orellana (Elementary Teacher: Lincoln, NE), Betsy Barent (Lincoln Public Schools: No City, No State)

Creating a Sustainably Integrated Pedagogy Using STEM, Social Studies, and ELA

Thursday, October 26 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2209



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA 2023_ Creating a Sustainably Integrated Pedagogy.pdf

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

According to recent studies, teaching elementary reading, writing, and math in isolation is not the most effective way for students to learn. We will show how it is possible to develop integrated learning opportunities using all of the subjects in the elementary school day-- building strong connections within young students' brains. Such rich and impactful experiences in student learning enhances the likelihood for students to make lasting connections with what they're learning every day. The Framework for K-12 Science in Education in conjunction with the NCSS C3 Framework is our basis for designing lessons and units. Presenters will model and help teachers brainstorm robust, integrated lessons with STEM, ELA, and social studies to improve student understanding in all subject areas as they gather, reason, and communicate connections in problem-solving STEM activities, fiction, informational text, writing, and simulated learning experiences– all capable of supporting each other.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn the connections between NGSS, NCSS, and CCSS and the impact they can have on student learning with mindful integration of these subjects. Using a template to guide their planning, attendees will begin to practice integrating lesson/unit plans based on their own core requirements.

SPEAKERS:
Deborah Draper (Cedar Ridge Elementary School: Cedar Hills, UT), Julie Siebach (Retired Teacher: Cedar Hills, UT)

Authentic Literacy and Language (ALL) for Science: Reading, Writing, and Thinking Like a Scientist!

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2202


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Participants will explore the Authentic Literacy and Language (ALL) for Science curriculum framework and discover how the combination of guided science investigations, mini-lessons on science-based disciplinary literacy, and science inquiry circles can increase learner performance. They will receive and be guided through a sample lesson and a template they can use to develop their own lessons using this framework. Teachers who used lessons using this curriculum framework reported that children demonstrated increased engagement with lessons and improved their language skills as they began to read, write, and think like scientists. They also found that children performed better overall on assessments of science concepts, attributing the use of collaborative learning teams that build a community of science practice as a factor. Participants will receive access to the ALL for Science website where they can download FREE curriculum resources aligned with NGSS standards.

TAKEAWAYS:
Educators will explore how they can create their own lessons unifying science investigations with science-specific disciplinary literacy using the ALLS framework to engage learners in the practices of science. Participants will receive the framework template and access to free resources.

SPEAKERS:
Jimmie Thomas (Baylor College of Medicine)

CSSS: Teaching Climate Through a Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) Lens

Thursday, October 26 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 3501 F


Show Details

Teaching climate change in diverse contexts often means we need to meet communities where they are at and teach through concerns that are central to their lives. The SDGs provide a framework of 17 central goals that help to foster thriving and sustainable communities. The SDGs are a global framework that is used across many different nations to raise awareness and engage people in action around critical needs for fostering thriving communities. This session will explore the SDG framework and its connections to climate literacy principles. Participants will be supported to consider examples of how this framework can be used for teaching students about sustainability, climate solutions, and green economy transitions that are critical to our shared future. We will draw on resources and experiences from partner organizations across the nation and the world. "

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Be able to describe the SDGs Framework 2. Explore the interrelationships between the SDG Framework and climate literacy principles 3. Consider connection points with the SDG Framework to your own teaching

SPEAKERS:
Deb Morrison (University of Washington: No City, No State), Brian Mandell (Smithsonian Science Education Center: Washington, DC), Molly Talbot (Louisiana Dept. of Education: Baton Rouge, LA)

Hooking Key Scientific Concepts for Below-Proficient Readers Using Anchor Texts

Friday, October 27 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2207


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

In the first part, participants will gain an understanding of how anchor texts are connected to science and engineering practices -- what students do using student work samples and sample anchor texts. First, we will explore the use of concept loading in scientific complex texts through a discussion, examples, and video. We will look at how scientific texts are organized to communicate key ideas through concept loading using text/visual features and text structures such as direct definition context clues through a group discussion. In groups, teachers will dissect a given text to develop a think-aloud to explicitly teach scientific key ideas and concepts using text/visual features. Next, we will compare informational and science fiction text using a model and T-chart for text organization/structure. We will unpack an NGSS standard so participants understand which key concepts and vocabulary must be presented in the given text through a group summary for key takeaways.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers as change agents provide the cultural tools through the modeling of science and engineering practices using literacy strategies. Through modeling, teachers can engage students to interact with complex informational texts for increased sensemaking.

SPEAKERS:
Leslie Birdon (Richwood High School: Monroe, LA)

Student Detectives: Learning Across the Curriculum

Friday, October 27 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2102 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Learning Across the Curriculum bookteacher guide list

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

As a nonfiction author, I always start where my readers are—hooking them in by grounding them in what they already know, then expanding on that knowledge. Teaching is no different, and incorporating nonfiction books into the curriculum can allow teachers to address standards across different disciplines while building their students’ understanding of a topic. This session will look at two books that can do this, one on that addresses interdependent relationships in ecosystems and one that examines natural hazards and the history of the planet. How do scientists use evidence to support their arguments, and how can we model those steps when teaching students how to develop their arguments in writing? Scientific research isn’t all that different from text-dependent analysis, and this presentation will discuss how to address both using true, jaw-dropping examples straight from our own backyards.

TAKEAWAYS:
We can use nonfiction books to ground learning, making information more accessible as students encounter information in a variety of ways across the curriculum.

SPEAKERS:
Alison Pearce Stevens (nonfiction author)

Sensemaking with Phenomenon Questioning Technique

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2102 A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Sensemaking with the Phenomenon Questioning Technique.pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

In this session, participants will experience and unpack the Phenomenon Questioning Technique and will be able to apply it in their classroom. Students observe a phenomenon and are given time to observe and wonder. In groups, students: - Ask as many questions as they can. - Don’t stop to discuss, judge, or answer questions. - Change any statements into questions. - Circle their best question. Remind students to think about what makes a good question as they make their choice (related to science, helps explain phenomena, able to be investigated or researched, etc.). - Share their questions on a “Student-Driven Question Board.” - ​​Using the commonalities, create one guiding question for the class. - Students reflect on how they did with questioning by way of the formative assessment.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will experience and unpack the Phenomenon Questioning Technique and will be able to apply it in their classrooms.

SPEAKERS:
Eric Hadley (Little Creek Nature Area: Florissant, MO), Rebecca Prokopf (Regional Curriculum Coordinator)

Holding the Line: Ensuring Science and Social Science Standards are Met in an ELA-Centric Elementary World

Friday, October 27 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2205


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Our goal is to demonstrate how one large urban district combined the standards from science, social science and ELA to make sure these standards are taught, even in a curriculum that is ELA-centric. The vast majority of the time in the day doesn't attempt to cover science or social science standards. We've woven our standards alongside the ELA standards and topics so that we are certain there is time for science and social science. This is important because as one sales rep has said, "I know it looks like science, but don't worry, its really reading." We don't want a student's science or social science experience to be relegated to just a 'Science Friday' situation.

TAKEAWAYS:
Students need to figure out science and social science, not just learn about them. To think like scientists and social scientists, students have to DO the work of scientists and social scientists.

SPEAKERS:
Cory Nilsen (Rockford Public Schools: Rockford, IL), Joshua Rappuhn (Rockford Public Schools: Rockford, IL)

Now You’re Talking! Leveraging Conversations to Drive Student Understanding

Friday, October 27 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2211


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

Students collaboratively figuring out phenomena or solutions is key to the NGSS. Teachers need tools to facilitate these discussions into academically rich experiences that support ALL students. Science investigations offer opportunities for engagement for all, but need to be guided expertly. Student engagement is critical for academic success, especially for our English Learners, Special Education, and Foster Youth. Science investigations offer a way to engage students at any level and keep them excited about learning. While working through phenomena, students need to crystalize their own thinking, then share these thoughts with others in order to fully develop them. To do so, certain academic language and terms must be used. Through the shared activity of investigating phenomena, students work through science concepts and use the needed science vocabulary. Teachers guide the discussions through scaffolded questions that facilitate student communication by clarifying their t

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn to lead students to conceptual understandings by using discussion tools, academic language, and discussion routines that promote equity and engagement.

SPEAKERS:
Heather McDonald (Riverside Unified School District: Riverside, CA), Julia Smith (Riverside Unified School District: Riverside, CA), Shannon Dadlez (Riverside Unified School District: Riverside, CA)

K-8 Science and Engineering Everyday? Yes! Hooray!

Saturday, October 28 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2203


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

This presentation helps K-8 educators, often with limited time for science, to encourage scientific thinking and an engineering mindset everyday by integrating activities into their current schedules. 1) Discussion of STEM research and the classroom challenges of time, resources, and training 2) Brief review of the crosscutting concepts, science and engineering practices, and 21st Century skills 3) Introduction of six specific 15 minute activities and their use as bell ringers (work students do when they enter the classroom), centers, or stand-alone activities. Educators participate as a student and learn to develop these types of activities. 4) Introduction of a method for using picture books to emphasize the science and engineering practices, crosscutting concepts, and engineering thinking all while saving time by integrating ELA and science using graphic organizers and writing prompts. 5) Educators use a tool to create an action plan for their own classrooms.

TAKEAWAYS:
K-8 educators will learn how to encourage scientific thinking and an engineering mindset everyday with specific 15 minute activities and ELA integration ideas.

SPEAKERS:
Emily Starr (STEM Specialist: Clinton, IA)

When I Grow Up… How To Use Literature & Writing to Inspire K-8 Students To Pursue STEM Careers

Saturday, October 28 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2210


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

This presentation helps K-8 educators to use picture books, informational texts, and writing opportunities to inspire students to pursue STEM careers. 1) Discussion of STEM research and the benefits of integrating science and literacy. 2) Introduction of over 120 STEM career picture books and specific tools for using them to address ELA concepts and highlight STEM careers. 3) Introduction of informational career texts and related strategies for developing ELA skills and scientific thinking. 4) Introduction of sources for STEM career videos and tools for integrating them into ELA instruction. 5) Introduction of student interest inventories to measure the impact of STEM career exposure.

TAKEAWAYS:
Educators will learn how to integrate ELA and STEM using picture books, informational texts, and writing opportunities to inspire students to pursue STEM careers.

SPEAKERS:
Emily Starr (STEM Specialist: Clinton, IA)

Using Fish in a Tree (Lynda Mullaly Hunt) to Incorporate STEM into Literacy

Saturday, October 28 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2208


STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

Using a story, such as Fish in a Tree, that is already being used in the classroom as the structure and inspiration for STEM-related activities is one way to incorporate additional time into the week for STEM. Some of our school districts have 45 minutes every other week dedicated to Science, so the idea is to incorporate scientific thinking and activities into the Literacy and Math blocks. Fish in a Tree is a perfect example of ways to incorporate science habits of mind from a non-science specific book. In this presentation, attendees will explore connections between the three dimensions of NGSS through the lens of literature, including the tools to create questioning strategies and prompts to incorporate into any book they and their students are reading. This session will provide attendees with the skills to take any reading and layer science and engineering into the context of the literature.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will take a deep dive into ways to incorporate aspects of three-dimensional science instruction through questioning strategies and activities using Fish in a Tree as the example literature. These strategies can be applied to any book you use with your students.

SPEAKERS:
Heather Summers (Project ECHO for Education)

Improving Science Literacy with Problem-Based Learning

Saturday, October 28 • 1:20 PM - 2:20 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2101



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Slides Science Literacy and PBL

STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Using research and facts to support decisions is a skill our students need to learn. Problem-based learning allows students to come up with multiple solutions to a problem and then, through the use of research, experimentation, and failure, students learn to scientifically support their thoughts and ideas. Problem-based learning helps students learn science content while also building important 21st century skills and lifelong practices. In a world where content facts are readily available and resources are waiting to me explores, students have the opportunity to see how their learning relates to current careers, as well as the opportunity to share their insights with others. Students get to explore literature while engaging in problem solving and science exploration.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will gain a better understanding of how to improve literacy while incorporating problem-based learning into the required units of study through discussion and brainstorming with peers on the use of Problem-Based practices.

SPEAKERS:
Charlsie Prosser (Education Professor and Chair: Baldwin City, KS), Tara Burnham (Assistant Professor of Education)

Teaching Science with Science Fiction

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2104 B



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Teaching Science Through Science Fiction
Teaching Science Through Science Fiction-Kansas City Presentation Science Fiction list for middle to high school Science Fiction Presentation Rubric

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

This presentation will consider the benefits of science fiction use in the science classroom and how SF is deeply tied to ethics. It will also give evidence of the many groundbreaking scientists and inventors who were inspired by science fiction. Classroom SF activities that encourage deep discussions about science and its place in society will be highlighted, as will suggestions for stories, movies, and novels that teach concepts in earth, space, physical, and life sciences. Detailed information about the SF genre and the impact of SF stories on science education and scientific literacy will be discussed. Participants will receive lesson plans and resources along with detailed lists of titles to integrate SF into their specific discipline, as well as history and literature links. Educators will participate in a lesson on biomes using SF as a medium for reviewing concepts and growing student interest in science. Classic authors and ways to integrate their stories will also be shown.

TAKEAWAYS:
Detailed ideas and resources for teaching concepts using science fiction in physical, earth, space, and life sciences, as well as history and literature.

SPEAKERS:
Kimberly Collingwood (Westwind Intermediate School: Phoenix, AZ)

Elementary Instruction: Now STREAMing

Saturday, October 28 • 2:40 PM - 3:40 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2103 C



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
STREAM Unit Planning - Exploring Ecosystems.pdf
STREAM Unit Planning - Exploring Shapes in Nature.pdf
STREAM Unit Planning - Solar Car.pdf

STRAND: STEM Haven

Show Details

During this session, we will look at various units of study appropriate for 3-5 grade curriculum and how all the contents interconnect. Lessons will focus on Science, Technology, Reading, Engineering, Arts, and Math integration. Samples of Lessons will be shared and participants will be asked to share how they are currently implementing STEM, STEAM, or STREAM lessons in their classrooms. Strategies that help students make connections between content areas and with the real-world help to drive a deeper understanding and allows students to build on their interests and wonderings. Now STREAMing lessons drive creativity, critical thinking, and collaboration.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will see examples of how to break lessons down into the STREAM elements while making connections with interdisciplinary standards.

SPEAKERS:
Tara Burnham (Assistant Professor of Education)

Incorporating Appendix H into Lessons to Build Skills in the Nature of Science

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2503 A



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1YUasZDXTciNorb51kRQ7amblxWwTBQw5?usp=sharing
This is the google drive folder that contains the slide show, resources, student activities, copies of theory/law/fact pyramid, handouts for organizing theories, science reasoning vs. motivated reasoning, and Nature of Science Help Sheet for students.

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking

Show Details

We’re all passionate about science, and part of that passion stems from the fact that no other discipline is exploring the entire physical universe and making sense of our world. No other discipline can make predictions as accurately as science can! It’s so powerful and engaging that some misunderstand it and use it for purposes it isn't intended to be used for. Some even manipulate our students’ misunderstandings of what science is, creating enough confusion that our students believe in junk science, disinformation, or even deny science! As science educators, we sometimes get distracted by all the minutia on our plates and do not directly incorporate the NGSS Appendix H: Understanding the Scientific Enterprise in our work. Students find joy in “debunking” bad science and become future citizens who can sniff out scientific misinformation. We'll enhance activities with the scientific thinking that is developed from a deeper understanding of the nature of science.

TAKEAWAYS:
Become familiar with NGSS Appendix H and use it to enhance your classroom activities to develop sensemaking skills that help your students to identify logical fallacies and misinformation that are used in sloppy science, disinformation, and science denial in their everyday experiences.

SPEAKERS:
Ericca Thornhill (Mizzou Academy: Columbia, MO)

Teaching Science with Superheroes: Engage Students with Illustrations from Movies, TV, Comics, and More!

Saturday, October 28 • 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Kansas City Convention Center - 2104 A


STRAND: Research to Practice

Show Details

Student engagement is a vital element for effective science instruction (Heddy & Sinatra, 2013). However, students typically become less engaged in science as they advance in school years (Ofsted, 2015). Superheroes have been a mainstay in popular culture and multimedia for decades. Science teachers can harness this widespread interest to enhance lessons, broaden assessments, and increase student engagement. Participants will examine multiple superhero examples, each with applications to specific NGSS performance expectations. They will also consider research content from science journals and organizations (National Geographic, Scientific American, NASA, NOAA, WHO, etc.) to catalyze further exploration and extensions. In addition to specific activities, teachers will practice analyzing popular culture and research for wider engagement. They will also review important copyright parameters and “fair use” in the classroom, with an emphasis on appropriate implementation.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants in this interactive session will examine a variety of multimedia superhero examples, with a focus on immediate classroom implementation AND legal copyright “fair use.” In addition to specific lessons, teachers will practice analyzing and applying media and research to engage students.

SPEAKERS:
Daniel Bergman (Wichita State University: Wichita, KS)

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